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8 Completely Ridiculous Restaurant Commercials From the 1980s Slideshow


7) Brown Derby

The food in modern commercials looks so perfectly manicured that it’s odd to see a commercial advertising food that actually looks like food. In this brief ad for Brown Derby, a now-defunct Hollywood-based chain widely credited with having invented the Cobb Salad, a $4.95 special is advertised: sirloin steak, Boston scrod, or beef shish kebab, with soup and salad. A cartoon mascot them awkwardly transforms himself into a map of the U.S. None of the dishes look particularly appetizing, unfortunately, and we’re still trying to figure out what the heck a scrod is.

5) Sambo’s

"We’re bringing down the high price of bringing up your kid," this commercial claimed as it advertised an awkwardly composed $0.25 "Samburger Jr." that appears way too tall for a kid to eat. Although we will admit that the kid saying "Dad, haven’t you heard of inflation?" after being given a quarter is pretty funny.

While the chain had no connection to the book The Story of Little Black Sambo, many people drew an obvious connotation and the company was met with a handful of protests and lawsuits. Even though there were more than 1,000 outposts in 47 states in 1981, only one remains today, in Santa Barbara, Calif.

4) Beefsteak Charlie’s

"I’m Beefsteak Charlie and you’re going to get spoiled with free shrimp," the mustachioed spokesman for this now-defunct (sensing a trend here?) New York chain tells the audience in a moderately condescending tone. Crazy-eyed cooks and servers then sing at the camera while awkwardly dangling a steak and carrying a comically large bowl of shrimp. Charlie then gets a little too close for comfort to a kid eating some free shrimp. How low in quality does shrimp have to be for a restaurant to give it away for free?

2) A&W

There’s something just slightly off about this Canadian commercial for the once-popular chain of A&W restaurants, but we can’t put our finger on it. Maybe it’s the bear that’s apparently conducting a band that can’t have more than three members. Maybe it’s the whole head of iceberg lettuce being torn apart. Maybe it’s the downright terrible jingle, loaded with gibberish. It might be the mystery ring of meat that they top the burger with (could that possibly be bacon?). One thing’s for certain, though: this commercial is completely ridiculous.


50 things people who grew up in 1970s San Francisco will remember

You chowed down on French fries at Kerry's Lounge and Restaurant: The restaurant was on Army Street (now Cesar Chavez) near Van Ness.

Chris Stewart / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

2 of 104 You saw KISS at the Cow Palace—the night Elvis died. This tough-looking group is in the building for a 1977 KISS concert - notable because the band was at the peak of their popularity, and it was the night Elvis died. KISS acknowledged the event, playing a special edition of "Jailhouse Rock." Chronicle photographer Stephanie Maze wisely photographed the crowd even more than the band, capturing youth in the 1970s perfectly. Stephanie Maze/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

4 of 104 You saw the Blue Angels at Moffett Field. In this photo the Blue Angels bunched up for a final pass over Highway 101, as they landed at Moffett Field after a practice run around the San Francisco bay area in the 1970s. CHP shut the freeway down for the Angels practice. (Photo by Gary Fong) Gary Fong/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

5 of 104 You remember the hippies hanging out in Golden Gate Park. And you longed to join them. Photo taken on August 17, 1978. Barney Peterson/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

7 of 104 You celebrated St. Patrick's Day at the Snake Races. In this photo, snake chaser, Steven Holt of Pacifica cheers on his snake "Sir Hiss" for the title "Fastest snake in the West" during the 20th annual St. Patrick's Day snake race in San Francisco. Undated AP photo, ca. 1970's. Show More Show Less

8 of 104 You went for live jazz at Keystone Korner. Jazz musician Sam Rivers performs at the North Beach club in 1977 Tom Copi/Getty Images Show More Show Less

10 of 104 You pet Charlie O at an Oakland A's game. The mule was the team mascot, named after the team's owner Charlie O. Finley at the time. In this photo, Charlie O gets a hat during Bald-Headed Day at the Oakland Coliseum. The mule died in 1976. Tom Levy / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember when the Muni tracks were installed near Duboce Triangle. Duboce near Church 1970s track installation, view west up Duboce. Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org.

Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org Show More Show Less

13 of 104 You remember the "mummy wrap" tapestry being draped over the Transamerica Pyramid Building. Nothing was safe from being macrame'd in the 1970's. April 29, 1974. Dave Randolph/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

14 of 104 You rode the Parkmobile through Golden Gate Park. Photo taken June 30, 1972. Greg Peterson/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

16 of 104 You brought your sled to the Snow-Ball. San Francisco Ice Company spread 17 tons of snow for the annual "Snow-Ball." Pictured is then Mayor Diane Feinstein giving a sledder a start. December 28, 1978. Clem Albers/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

17 of 104 You paid 25 cents to ride Muni. It cost 25 cents to ride the train throughout most of the 1970's. Photo of San Francisco Muni buses on Castro and 17th Streets, September 30, 1979. Clem Albers/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

19 of 104 You remember the White Night Riots. In this photo, San Francisco Police try to restore order at City Hall during the protests and riots that took place after the Dan White Verdict May 21 1979 John Storey / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

20 of 104 You remember the day Charles Mason was convicted. His followers committed a series of nine murders at four locations in 1969. Manson was convicted in 1971 of first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder for the deaths of seven people, all of which were carried out at his instruction by members of the group. He was also convicted of first-degree murder for two other killings. Uncredited/Associated Press Show More Show Less

22 of 104 You went to the Musee Mechanique when it was on the lower level of the Cliff House. The collection of more than 150 antique mechanical amusements has since moved to a location at Fisherman's Wharf. JERRY TELFER Show More Show Less

23 of 104 You listened to "The Emperor" Gene Nelson on KYA. He ruled the radio waves in the 60s and 70s. In this photo, he's receiving the Bay Area Radio Hall of Fame award and pictured with DJ Celeste Perry Courtesy Ben Fong-Torres Show More Show Less

25 of 104 You remember listened to Lon Simmons (left) broadcast Giant's games on KSFO. Simmons is pictured with Joe Angel in the San Francisco Giants broadcast booth on July 12, 1978. Terry Schmitt/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

26 of 104 You remember when Muni buses looked like this. In this 1975 photo, a New San Francisco Muni bus stands in front of an old Muni bus. Chronicle archives Show More Show Less

28 of 104 You'll never forget the Oakland A's World Series run. The team won three consecutive World Championships between 1972 and 1974, led by memorable players including Catfish Hunter, Reggie Jackson, ace reliever Rollie Fingers, and colorful owner Charlie O. Finley. (Photo: Pitcher Ken Holtzman, of the Oakland As, hurls a pitch towards a Mets batter in fifth inning, of the first game of the World Series, Saturday, Oct. 13, 1973, Oakland, Calif.) Anonymous/ASSOCIATED PRESS Show More Show Less

29 of 104 You were a huge fan of the local band Journey—and their big hair. You saw them play at Golden Gate Park and maybe you were even lucky enough to go to high school with Neal Schon (pictured far left). Courtesy Colombia Records Show More Show Less

31 of 104 You saw Willie Mays hit a homer at Candlestick Park. Mays played for the Giants until 1972, and famously got career hit No. 3000 in the second inning of the Giants' game against the Montreal Expos on July 18, 1970. Focus On Sport/Focus on Sport/Getty Images Show More Show Less

32 of 104 You remember the opening of BART and feared traveling through an underwater tube. The Bay Area transportation system officially opened on Sept. 11, 1972, initially between the MacArther and Fremont stations. The Transbay Tube opened in 1974. Train failures were common in BART's early days. In this photo, patrons enter the Oakland City Center BART station on the opening day. Charles B. Peterson/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You wore groovy clothes. Polyester was the material of choice and bright colors dominated. In this 1971 photo, a man wears matching pants and sweater. In the background, you can see the U.S. Mint and Hotel Pickwick. A commenter identified the vintage cars as (from left): a 1968-72 Opel Kadett (B) wagon, 1962 Mercury Comet, 1971 Plymouth Fury and behind the Fury, a '68-69 Buick Skylark.

35 of 104 You saw Dianne Feinstein pose in a Sutro Baths bathing suit at the opening of Pier 39. Feinstein was the President of the Board of Supervisors at the time, and wore the suit at the opening after losing a bet that the tourism center would open on time. The park opened on October 4, 1978. Jerry Telfer/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember trips across the Bay Bridge with no traffic. You also remember the old eastern span. This photo was taken on the western span in 1971.

38 of 104 You were a fan of the Dead Kennedys. This punk rock band formed in San Francisco in 1978 and became known for its politically charged songs. They frequently played at the North Beach nightclub Mabuhay Gardens. Their name was controversial. San Francisco Chronicle columnist Herb Caen wrote in November 1978, "Just when you think tastelessness has reached its nadir, along comes a punk rock group called 'The Dead Kennedys', which will play at Mabuhay Gardens on Nov. 22, the 15th anniversary of John F. Kennedy's assassination." (Pictured: Jello Biafra of the Dead Kennedys) John O'Hara/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

40 of 104 You remember Candlestick Park with AstroTurf. The natural bluegrass was torn up and the AstroTurf rolled out in 1970. The real grass returned again following the 1978 football season. This photo shows a stolen Piece of AstroTurf at Candlestick Park on Dec. 12, 1978. Show More Show Less

41 of 104 You were an activist. You marched in protests and mourned the loss of trailblazing leader and Supervisor Harvey Milk, who was the first openly gay man elected to public office in America. This photo is from December 1978 on the the wall of the Bank of America at Castro and Market. (Photo: (c) Jerry Pritikin) Jerry Pritikin Show More Show Less

You rode the cable car with friends—and didn't take selfies. Riding the cable car was was pretty much the same experience for tourists of 1971 as it is today—although fares cost less, lines were shorter and nobody was taking dozens of photos.

44 of 104 You'll never forget the day it snowed: Feb. 5, 1976. It was a rare San Francisco snow day, and the white stuff actually stuck to the ground. Clem Albers/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember Grimes Poznikoff, aka "The Human Jukebox." He was a fixture on Fisherman's Wharf in the 1970s and 80s, and waited in a cardboard refrigerator box until someone gave him a donation and requested a song. Then he'd pop out of the front flap and play the song on a trumpet, kazoo or other random instrument. Here he's pictured circa 1978.

You never saw Carol Doda perform live—but you knew who she was. America's first public topless dancer was a huge draw in North Beach in the '60s and '70s.

49 of 104 You always went to Monkey Island first on visits to the San Francisco Zoo. It was damaged in the 1989 earthquake and razed and paved over. Express-News archives Show More Show Less

You feared the "Zodiac" killer. The Zodiac killer is blamed for at least five murders in 1968 and 1969 in the San Francisco Bay Area. Though other serial killers have had more victims, the "Zodiac" intrigued and terrified the public with his mysterious ways. He sent suspected letters to the Vallejo Times Herald, San Francisco Chronicle and other newspapers as late as 1974, warning he'd strike again. He was never caught, though many, including author Robert Graysmith, believe he was Arthur Leigh Allen, a Vallejo man who who died in 1992.

You stopped to listen to the many musicians and buskers on city streets. Back then you actually stopped to listen because you weren't wearing headphones and listing to your playlist on your phone as you walked by. This street musician strums and sings for tips at Pier 45 on Fisherman's Wharf in 1971. Behind him is the now-demolished Tait's at the Wharf.

53 of 104 You learned to drive in the parking lot of the White Front discount variety store. This store's massive parking lot was the perfect place for teenagers to learn to drive. "All my friends learned to drive there," wrote one S.F. local in the Facebook group San Francisco Remembered. White Front was a cross between a Kohl's and a dollar store and the one in S.F. was located at 16th and Bryant streets, the current location of the SoMa Safeway. (Note: This photo is pre-70s and was taken on Dec. 17, 1968) Art Frisch/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

55 of 104 You stayed up late to watch Bob Wilkins on "Creature Features." The cigar-wielding host introduced underground flicks with titles like "Attack of the Mushroom People" on the late-night movie show airing on KTVU's Channel 2 through the 1970s. In this photo, Wilkins sits with co-host John Stanley. KQED Show More Show Less

56 of 104 Buy Photo You feasted on Blum's Coffee Crunch Cake. This heavenly dessert was invented by Ernest Weil, the operations manager of the late bakery soda fountain chain, Blum's, with a location in the basement of the downtown Macy's. (Note: The photo features a modern-day re-creation of the cake.) Liz Hafalia/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

58 of 104 You ate hot dogs at a Doggie Diner. At one point there were more than two dozen in the Bay Area. The last one closed in 1986. Its founder Al Ross died in 2010, at age 93. RIP Doggie Diner. (Susan Ehmer / The Chronicle 1978) Show More Show Less

59 of 104 You mourned the closing of Playland-at-the-Beach in 1972. In this photo, Bill Smit, 74, rides a Playland-at-the-Beach carousel horse one more time on the day before the ride went up for auction. Clem Albers / Clem Albers / The Chronicle 1972 Show More Show Less

61 of 104 You appreciated Dr. Don Rose's corny one-liners on KFRC "The Big 610." Dr. Rose's top-40 show was No. 1 rated virtually from its 1973 start until the station changed to a big band format in 1986. ho Show More Show Less

You shopped for jewelry from the stalls lining Fisherman's Wharf. This was an era of craftspeople and many sold their goods around the city. Photo taken circa 1978.

64 of 104 Your swim team coach was Charlie Sava. He coached Olympic Swimmer Ann Curtis and hundreds of other S.F. kids. Photo taken on Aug. 13, 1987 of Ann Curtis, Charlie Sava and Wendy Nelder at the dedication of the Charlie Sava Pool in the Sunset District. Sava died on his way to work at the pool in 1987. (Pete Breinig / The Chronicle) Show More Show Less

65 of 104 You listened to KYA Radio. And you remember the Matthew's TV and Stereo commercials: "Top of the hill, Daly City!" KYA Show More Show Less

67 of 104 You saw a Day on the Green concert at the Oakland Coliseum. Presented by promotor Bill Graham, the lineup in the 70s was extraordinary: Led Zeppelin, Grateful Dead, The Beach Boys, Eagles, Fleetwood Mac and The Who (pictured). Michael Zagaris/Reel Art Press Show More Show Less

68 of 104 You ate many hard-roll sandwiches from Panelli Brothers Deli. The brothers closed their North Beach establishment in 2002 after 82 years in business. Show More Show Less

70 of 104 You bought your vinyl at Tower Records. You also lined up at the music store for concert tickets. Pictured: Tower Records at Bay Street and Columbus Avenue in San Francisco: Once thriving -- and noisy -- it's now out of business. Chris Hardy/SFC Show More Show Less

71 of 104 You rode the Ferris wheel atop Emporium during the holidays. A holiday tradition at The Emporium was the roof rides which were hoisted onto the roofs of both The Emporium downtown and Stonestown stores each year. Photographer unknown Show More Show Less

You remember the Embarcadero Freeway. The double-decker stretch of highway was demolished after the Loma Prieta Earthquake in 1989.

74 of 104 You chowed down on French fries at Kerry's Lounge and Restaurant. It was located on Army Street near Van Ness and stayed open 24 hours. Chris Stewart/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

76 of 104 You watched Robert Shields perform with his mime, Lorene Yarnell. Here he is pictured at Ghirardelli Square, January 13, 1975 Stephanie Maze/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You rode an electric green-and-white bus to school. Here's the 9-Richland Line Electric Bus #859 pictured at Murray and Crescent on August 1976. Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org.

Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org Show More Show Less

79 of 104 You remember when a scene from "The Streets of San Francisco" was shot on your block. The crime drama starring Karl Malden, right, and Michael Douglas as detectives ran for five seasons between 1972 and 1977. Unlike today's shows that are mostly shot in Hollywood sets, this show was almost entirely shot on location in San Francisco. Courtesy ABC TV/1975/AP Show More Show Less

You saw the Grateful Dead play at Winterland. Here Drummers Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart perform on New Year's Eve 1977 with The Dead at Winterland. Lighting up behind the drummers are Phil Lesh, Bill Graham, Ken Kesey and roadie Steve Parrish.

82 of 104 You saw "Star Wars" at the Coronet. The theater at the corner of Geary Boulevard and Arguello Avenue was torn down to build senior housing. In this photo taken on May 28, 1977, movie-goers are getting out of the the 1 p.m. show show of "Star Wars" on opening day. The film went on to make more than $2 million in six months at the theater. Show More Show Less

You traveled to Berkeley to buy your tie-dye on Telegraph Avenue. The trend stared in the 1960s and carried over into the 70s. This photo was taken in 1971 by photographer Nick DeWolf who traveled from Boston to the Bay Area to take photographs of the 1970s Bay Area.

85 of 104 You remember the smell of pot during the Laserium shows at the Morrison Planetarium at the California Academy of Sciences. The psychedelic rock planetarium show ran from 1974 to 2000. Pink Floyd, The Beatles and The Doors were favorite shows. Chronicle archives Show More Show Less

86 of 104 Listening to jazz on the bandstand at Earthquake McGoon's. Turk Murphy's Jazz Band, pictured, were favorites at this venue. Barney Peterson/Chronicle File Show More Show Less

88 of 104 You ate late-night at Zim's Hamburgers. This location pictured at 19th and Taraval was "closed for renovation" in August 1978, but in reality there was a strike. Jerry Telfer/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

89 of 104 You celebrated a birthday at the Hippo on Van Ness. Remember the Hippo burger, the thick shakes and sweet birthday cakes? Susan Gilbert/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

91 of 104 You stared up in awe at the living Christmas tree under the dome in the City of Paris Department store. In this photo, mannequins on the second floor get a good view of the tree that rises to the top of the rotunda in San Francisco's City of Paris Department Store, Nov. 20, 1972. Joe Rosenthal/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

92 of 104 You remember the opening of St. Mary's Cathedral. Here the church on Cathedral Hill is pictured during construction on Aug. 26, 1969. The cathedral replaced one of the same name that was built in 1891 and burned in 1962. Stan Creighton/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

94 of 104 You rented roller skates in Golden Gate Park. In this December 1977 photo, a roller skate rental truck rents skates at the corner of Fulton Street and Eighth Avenue near Golden Gate Park. John Storey/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

95 of 104 You devoured a burger at Bill's Place. This Richmond spot on Clement Street is still going. All of its burgers are named after S.F. celebrities and the meat is ground fresh daily. (File photo) Show More Show Less

97 of 104 You remember the old California Academy of Sciences. The building was damaged in the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and was relocated downtown to a temporary location before reopening after a complete overhaul in 2008. Peter Breinig/The Chronicle, 1984 Show More Show Less

You remember the buildings that burned on Alcatraz during the Indian occupation. The small island, formerly the location of a prison, was occupied by Native American activists between 1969 and 1971. This photo of the Alcatraz warden's house and lighthouse was taken a year after the mansion burned during the Indian occupation. The entire island was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.

You remember when O.J. Simpson played for the 49ers. Simpson played for the 49ers from 1978-79. He's now better known for his trial and acquittal for the murders of his former wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman.

Focus On Sport/Getty Images Show More Show Less

101 of 104 You jumped into the mosh pit at Mabuhay Gardens. This North Beach punk rock nightclub booked two bands a night seven days a week in its late-70s heyday. Frequent gigs were played by local bands the Avengers, Dead Kennedys, The Nuns, Crime, Dils, Pearl Harbor and the Explosions, the Tubes and Wall of Voodoo. The club's operator Dirksen also booked everyone from Iggy Pop and The Ramones to the Go Go's. Richard McCaffrey/Getty Images Show More Show Less

103 of 104 Tower Records at Columbus and Bay in San Francisco is seen in a file photo. Chris Hardy/SFC Show More Show Less

The 1970s in San Francisco were flamboyant, alive, full of color and passion, marked by dark periods and electric highs.

To grow up in San Francisco in this prismatic era was extraordinary, and anyone who spent their early years here in the 1970s has vivid memories swirling around in the mind.

In the gallery above, we try to capture some, and we thank the Facebook page San Francisco Remembered and its active and knowledgeable community who helped create this list.

The Summer of Love was over, but the free-loving hippie spirit prevailed, and bohemians, buskers, bongo-drum players and jewelry makers thronged the city.


50 things people who grew up in 1970s San Francisco will remember

You chowed down on French fries at Kerry's Lounge and Restaurant: The restaurant was on Army Street (now Cesar Chavez) near Van Ness.

Chris Stewart / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

2 of 104 You saw KISS at the Cow Palace—the night Elvis died. This tough-looking group is in the building for a 1977 KISS concert - notable because the band was at the peak of their popularity, and it was the night Elvis died. KISS acknowledged the event, playing a special edition of "Jailhouse Rock." Chronicle photographer Stephanie Maze wisely photographed the crowd even more than the band, capturing youth in the 1970s perfectly. Stephanie Maze/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

4 of 104 You saw the Blue Angels at Moffett Field. In this photo the Blue Angels bunched up for a final pass over Highway 101, as they landed at Moffett Field after a practice run around the San Francisco bay area in the 1970s. CHP shut the freeway down for the Angels practice. (Photo by Gary Fong) Gary Fong/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

5 of 104 You remember the hippies hanging out in Golden Gate Park. And you longed to join them. Photo taken on August 17, 1978. Barney Peterson/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

7 of 104 You celebrated St. Patrick's Day at the Snake Races. In this photo, snake chaser, Steven Holt of Pacifica cheers on his snake "Sir Hiss" for the title "Fastest snake in the West" during the 20th annual St. Patrick's Day snake race in San Francisco. Undated AP photo, ca. 1970's. Show More Show Less

8 of 104 You went for live jazz at Keystone Korner. Jazz musician Sam Rivers performs at the North Beach club in 1977 Tom Copi/Getty Images Show More Show Less

10 of 104 You pet Charlie O at an Oakland A's game. The mule was the team mascot, named after the team's owner Charlie O. Finley at the time. In this photo, Charlie O gets a hat during Bald-Headed Day at the Oakland Coliseum. The mule died in 1976. Tom Levy / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember when the Muni tracks were installed near Duboce Triangle. Duboce near Church 1970s track installation, view west up Duboce. Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org.

Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org Show More Show Less

13 of 104 You remember the "mummy wrap" tapestry being draped over the Transamerica Pyramid Building. Nothing was safe from being macrame'd in the 1970's. April 29, 1974. Dave Randolph/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

14 of 104 You rode the Parkmobile through Golden Gate Park. Photo taken June 30, 1972. Greg Peterson/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

16 of 104 You brought your sled to the Snow-Ball. San Francisco Ice Company spread 17 tons of snow for the annual "Snow-Ball." Pictured is then Mayor Diane Feinstein giving a sledder a start. December 28, 1978. Clem Albers/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

17 of 104 You paid 25 cents to ride Muni. It cost 25 cents to ride the train throughout most of the 1970's. Photo of San Francisco Muni buses on Castro and 17th Streets, September 30, 1979. Clem Albers/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

19 of 104 You remember the White Night Riots. In this photo, San Francisco Police try to restore order at City Hall during the protests and riots that took place after the Dan White Verdict May 21 1979 John Storey / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

20 of 104 You remember the day Charles Mason was convicted. His followers committed a series of nine murders at four locations in 1969. Manson was convicted in 1971 of first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder for the deaths of seven people, all of which were carried out at his instruction by members of the group. He was also convicted of first-degree murder for two other killings. Uncredited/Associated Press Show More Show Less

22 of 104 You went to the Musee Mechanique when it was on the lower level of the Cliff House. The collection of more than 150 antique mechanical amusements has since moved to a location at Fisherman's Wharf. JERRY TELFER Show More Show Less

23 of 104 You listened to "The Emperor" Gene Nelson on KYA. He ruled the radio waves in the 60s and 70s. In this photo, he's receiving the Bay Area Radio Hall of Fame award and pictured with DJ Celeste Perry Courtesy Ben Fong-Torres Show More Show Less

25 of 104 You remember listened to Lon Simmons (left) broadcast Giant's games on KSFO. Simmons is pictured with Joe Angel in the San Francisco Giants broadcast booth on July 12, 1978. Terry Schmitt/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

26 of 104 You remember when Muni buses looked like this. In this 1975 photo, a New San Francisco Muni bus stands in front of an old Muni bus. Chronicle archives Show More Show Less

28 of 104 You'll never forget the Oakland A's World Series run. The team won three consecutive World Championships between 1972 and 1974, led by memorable players including Catfish Hunter, Reggie Jackson, ace reliever Rollie Fingers, and colorful owner Charlie O. Finley. (Photo: Pitcher Ken Holtzman, of the Oakland As, hurls a pitch towards a Mets batter in fifth inning, of the first game of the World Series, Saturday, Oct. 13, 1973, Oakland, Calif.) Anonymous/ASSOCIATED PRESS Show More Show Less

29 of 104 You were a huge fan of the local band Journey—and their big hair. You saw them play at Golden Gate Park and maybe you were even lucky enough to go to high school with Neal Schon (pictured far left). Courtesy Colombia Records Show More Show Less

31 of 104 You saw Willie Mays hit a homer at Candlestick Park. Mays played for the Giants until 1972, and famously got career hit No. 3000 in the second inning of the Giants' game against the Montreal Expos on July 18, 1970. Focus On Sport/Focus on Sport/Getty Images Show More Show Less

32 of 104 You remember the opening of BART and feared traveling through an underwater tube. The Bay Area transportation system officially opened on Sept. 11, 1972, initially between the MacArther and Fremont stations. The Transbay Tube opened in 1974. Train failures were common in BART's early days. In this photo, patrons enter the Oakland City Center BART station on the opening day. Charles B. Peterson/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You wore groovy clothes. Polyester was the material of choice and bright colors dominated. In this 1971 photo, a man wears matching pants and sweater. In the background, you can see the U.S. Mint and Hotel Pickwick. A commenter identified the vintage cars as (from left): a 1968-72 Opel Kadett (B) wagon, 1962 Mercury Comet, 1971 Plymouth Fury and behind the Fury, a '68-69 Buick Skylark.

35 of 104 You saw Dianne Feinstein pose in a Sutro Baths bathing suit at the opening of Pier 39. Feinstein was the President of the Board of Supervisors at the time, and wore the suit at the opening after losing a bet that the tourism center would open on time. The park opened on October 4, 1978. Jerry Telfer/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember trips across the Bay Bridge with no traffic. You also remember the old eastern span. This photo was taken on the western span in 1971.

38 of 104 You were a fan of the Dead Kennedys. This punk rock band formed in San Francisco in 1978 and became known for its politically charged songs. They frequently played at the North Beach nightclub Mabuhay Gardens. Their name was controversial. San Francisco Chronicle columnist Herb Caen wrote in November 1978, "Just when you think tastelessness has reached its nadir, along comes a punk rock group called 'The Dead Kennedys', which will play at Mabuhay Gardens on Nov. 22, the 15th anniversary of John F. Kennedy's assassination." (Pictured: Jello Biafra of the Dead Kennedys) John O'Hara/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

40 of 104 You remember Candlestick Park with AstroTurf. The natural bluegrass was torn up and the AstroTurf rolled out in 1970. The real grass returned again following the 1978 football season. This photo shows a stolen Piece of AstroTurf at Candlestick Park on Dec. 12, 1978. Show More Show Less

41 of 104 You were an activist. You marched in protests and mourned the loss of trailblazing leader and Supervisor Harvey Milk, who was the first openly gay man elected to public office in America. This photo is from December 1978 on the the wall of the Bank of America at Castro and Market. (Photo: (c) Jerry Pritikin) Jerry Pritikin Show More Show Less

You rode the cable car with friends—and didn't take selfies. Riding the cable car was was pretty much the same experience for tourists of 1971 as it is today—although fares cost less, lines were shorter and nobody was taking dozens of photos.

44 of 104 You'll never forget the day it snowed: Feb. 5, 1976. It was a rare San Francisco snow day, and the white stuff actually stuck to the ground. Clem Albers/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember Grimes Poznikoff, aka "The Human Jukebox." He was a fixture on Fisherman's Wharf in the 1970s and 80s, and waited in a cardboard refrigerator box until someone gave him a donation and requested a song. Then he'd pop out of the front flap and play the song on a trumpet, kazoo or other random instrument. Here he's pictured circa 1978.

You never saw Carol Doda perform live—but you knew who she was. America's first public topless dancer was a huge draw in North Beach in the '60s and '70s.

49 of 104 You always went to Monkey Island first on visits to the San Francisco Zoo. It was damaged in the 1989 earthquake and razed and paved over. Express-News archives Show More Show Less

You feared the "Zodiac" killer. The Zodiac killer is blamed for at least five murders in 1968 and 1969 in the San Francisco Bay Area. Though other serial killers have had more victims, the "Zodiac" intrigued and terrified the public with his mysterious ways. He sent suspected letters to the Vallejo Times Herald, San Francisco Chronicle and other newspapers as late as 1974, warning he'd strike again. He was never caught, though many, including author Robert Graysmith, believe he was Arthur Leigh Allen, a Vallejo man who who died in 1992.

You stopped to listen to the many musicians and buskers on city streets. Back then you actually stopped to listen because you weren't wearing headphones and listing to your playlist on your phone as you walked by. This street musician strums and sings for tips at Pier 45 on Fisherman's Wharf in 1971. Behind him is the now-demolished Tait's at the Wharf.

53 of 104 You learned to drive in the parking lot of the White Front discount variety store. This store's massive parking lot was the perfect place for teenagers to learn to drive. "All my friends learned to drive there," wrote one S.F. local in the Facebook group San Francisco Remembered. White Front was a cross between a Kohl's and a dollar store and the one in S.F. was located at 16th and Bryant streets, the current location of the SoMa Safeway. (Note: This photo is pre-70s and was taken on Dec. 17, 1968) Art Frisch/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

55 of 104 You stayed up late to watch Bob Wilkins on "Creature Features." The cigar-wielding host introduced underground flicks with titles like "Attack of the Mushroom People" on the late-night movie show airing on KTVU's Channel 2 through the 1970s. In this photo, Wilkins sits with co-host John Stanley. KQED Show More Show Less

56 of 104 Buy Photo You feasted on Blum's Coffee Crunch Cake. This heavenly dessert was invented by Ernest Weil, the operations manager of the late bakery soda fountain chain, Blum's, with a location in the basement of the downtown Macy's. (Note: The photo features a modern-day re-creation of the cake.) Liz Hafalia/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

58 of 104 You ate hot dogs at a Doggie Diner. At one point there were more than two dozen in the Bay Area. The last one closed in 1986. Its founder Al Ross died in 2010, at age 93. RIP Doggie Diner. (Susan Ehmer / The Chronicle 1978) Show More Show Less

59 of 104 You mourned the closing of Playland-at-the-Beach in 1972. In this photo, Bill Smit, 74, rides a Playland-at-the-Beach carousel horse one more time on the day before the ride went up for auction. Clem Albers / Clem Albers / The Chronicle 1972 Show More Show Less

61 of 104 You appreciated Dr. Don Rose's corny one-liners on KFRC "The Big 610." Dr. Rose's top-40 show was No. 1 rated virtually from its 1973 start until the station changed to a big band format in 1986. ho Show More Show Less

You shopped for jewelry from the stalls lining Fisherman's Wharf. This was an era of craftspeople and many sold their goods around the city. Photo taken circa 1978.

64 of 104 Your swim team coach was Charlie Sava. He coached Olympic Swimmer Ann Curtis and hundreds of other S.F. kids. Photo taken on Aug. 13, 1987 of Ann Curtis, Charlie Sava and Wendy Nelder at the dedication of the Charlie Sava Pool in the Sunset District. Sava died on his way to work at the pool in 1987. (Pete Breinig / The Chronicle) Show More Show Less

65 of 104 You listened to KYA Radio. And you remember the Matthew's TV and Stereo commercials: "Top of the hill, Daly City!" KYA Show More Show Less

67 of 104 You saw a Day on the Green concert at the Oakland Coliseum. Presented by promotor Bill Graham, the lineup in the 70s was extraordinary: Led Zeppelin, Grateful Dead, The Beach Boys, Eagles, Fleetwood Mac and The Who (pictured). Michael Zagaris/Reel Art Press Show More Show Less

68 of 104 You ate many hard-roll sandwiches from Panelli Brothers Deli. The brothers closed their North Beach establishment in 2002 after 82 years in business. Show More Show Less

70 of 104 You bought your vinyl at Tower Records. You also lined up at the music store for concert tickets. Pictured: Tower Records at Bay Street and Columbus Avenue in San Francisco: Once thriving -- and noisy -- it's now out of business. Chris Hardy/SFC Show More Show Less

71 of 104 You rode the Ferris wheel atop Emporium during the holidays. A holiday tradition at The Emporium was the roof rides which were hoisted onto the roofs of both The Emporium downtown and Stonestown stores each year. Photographer unknown Show More Show Less

You remember the Embarcadero Freeway. The double-decker stretch of highway was demolished after the Loma Prieta Earthquake in 1989.

74 of 104 You chowed down on French fries at Kerry's Lounge and Restaurant. It was located on Army Street near Van Ness and stayed open 24 hours. Chris Stewart/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

76 of 104 You watched Robert Shields perform with his mime, Lorene Yarnell. Here he is pictured at Ghirardelli Square, January 13, 1975 Stephanie Maze/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You rode an electric green-and-white bus to school. Here's the 9-Richland Line Electric Bus #859 pictured at Murray and Crescent on August 1976. Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org.

Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org Show More Show Less

79 of 104 You remember when a scene from "The Streets of San Francisco" was shot on your block. The crime drama starring Karl Malden, right, and Michael Douglas as detectives ran for five seasons between 1972 and 1977. Unlike today's shows that are mostly shot in Hollywood sets, this show was almost entirely shot on location in San Francisco. Courtesy ABC TV/1975/AP Show More Show Less

You saw the Grateful Dead play at Winterland. Here Drummers Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart perform on New Year's Eve 1977 with The Dead at Winterland. Lighting up behind the drummers are Phil Lesh, Bill Graham, Ken Kesey and roadie Steve Parrish.

82 of 104 You saw "Star Wars" at the Coronet. The theater at the corner of Geary Boulevard and Arguello Avenue was torn down to build senior housing. In this photo taken on May 28, 1977, movie-goers are getting out of the the 1 p.m. show show of "Star Wars" on opening day. The film went on to make more than $2 million in six months at the theater. Show More Show Less

You traveled to Berkeley to buy your tie-dye on Telegraph Avenue. The trend stared in the 1960s and carried over into the 70s. This photo was taken in 1971 by photographer Nick DeWolf who traveled from Boston to the Bay Area to take photographs of the 1970s Bay Area.

85 of 104 You remember the smell of pot during the Laserium shows at the Morrison Planetarium at the California Academy of Sciences. The psychedelic rock planetarium show ran from 1974 to 2000. Pink Floyd, The Beatles and The Doors were favorite shows. Chronicle archives Show More Show Less

86 of 104 Listening to jazz on the bandstand at Earthquake McGoon's. Turk Murphy's Jazz Band, pictured, were favorites at this venue. Barney Peterson/Chronicle File Show More Show Less

88 of 104 You ate late-night at Zim's Hamburgers. This location pictured at 19th and Taraval was "closed for renovation" in August 1978, but in reality there was a strike. Jerry Telfer/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

89 of 104 You celebrated a birthday at the Hippo on Van Ness. Remember the Hippo burger, the thick shakes and sweet birthday cakes? Susan Gilbert/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

91 of 104 You stared up in awe at the living Christmas tree under the dome in the City of Paris Department store. In this photo, mannequins on the second floor get a good view of the tree that rises to the top of the rotunda in San Francisco's City of Paris Department Store, Nov. 20, 1972. Joe Rosenthal/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

92 of 104 You remember the opening of St. Mary's Cathedral. Here the church on Cathedral Hill is pictured during construction on Aug. 26, 1969. The cathedral replaced one of the same name that was built in 1891 and burned in 1962. Stan Creighton/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

94 of 104 You rented roller skates in Golden Gate Park. In this December 1977 photo, a roller skate rental truck rents skates at the corner of Fulton Street and Eighth Avenue near Golden Gate Park. John Storey/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

95 of 104 You devoured a burger at Bill's Place. This Richmond spot on Clement Street is still going. All of its burgers are named after S.F. celebrities and the meat is ground fresh daily. (File photo) Show More Show Less

97 of 104 You remember the old California Academy of Sciences. The building was damaged in the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and was relocated downtown to a temporary location before reopening after a complete overhaul in 2008. Peter Breinig/The Chronicle, 1984 Show More Show Less

You remember the buildings that burned on Alcatraz during the Indian occupation. The small island, formerly the location of a prison, was occupied by Native American activists between 1969 and 1971. This photo of the Alcatraz warden's house and lighthouse was taken a year after the mansion burned during the Indian occupation. The entire island was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.

You remember when O.J. Simpson played for the 49ers. Simpson played for the 49ers from 1978-79. He's now better known for his trial and acquittal for the murders of his former wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman.

Focus On Sport/Getty Images Show More Show Less

101 of 104 You jumped into the mosh pit at Mabuhay Gardens. This North Beach punk rock nightclub booked two bands a night seven days a week in its late-70s heyday. Frequent gigs were played by local bands the Avengers, Dead Kennedys, The Nuns, Crime, Dils, Pearl Harbor and the Explosions, the Tubes and Wall of Voodoo. The club's operator Dirksen also booked everyone from Iggy Pop and The Ramones to the Go Go's. Richard McCaffrey/Getty Images Show More Show Less

103 of 104 Tower Records at Columbus and Bay in San Francisco is seen in a file photo. Chris Hardy/SFC Show More Show Less

The 1970s in San Francisco were flamboyant, alive, full of color and passion, marked by dark periods and electric highs.

To grow up in San Francisco in this prismatic era was extraordinary, and anyone who spent their early years here in the 1970s has vivid memories swirling around in the mind.

In the gallery above, we try to capture some, and we thank the Facebook page San Francisco Remembered and its active and knowledgeable community who helped create this list.

The Summer of Love was over, but the free-loving hippie spirit prevailed, and bohemians, buskers, bongo-drum players and jewelry makers thronged the city.


50 things people who grew up in 1970s San Francisco will remember

You chowed down on French fries at Kerry's Lounge and Restaurant: The restaurant was on Army Street (now Cesar Chavez) near Van Ness.

Chris Stewart / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

2 of 104 You saw KISS at the Cow Palace—the night Elvis died. This tough-looking group is in the building for a 1977 KISS concert - notable because the band was at the peak of their popularity, and it was the night Elvis died. KISS acknowledged the event, playing a special edition of "Jailhouse Rock." Chronicle photographer Stephanie Maze wisely photographed the crowd even more than the band, capturing youth in the 1970s perfectly. Stephanie Maze/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

4 of 104 You saw the Blue Angels at Moffett Field. In this photo the Blue Angels bunched up for a final pass over Highway 101, as they landed at Moffett Field after a practice run around the San Francisco bay area in the 1970s. CHP shut the freeway down for the Angels practice. (Photo by Gary Fong) Gary Fong/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

5 of 104 You remember the hippies hanging out in Golden Gate Park. And you longed to join them. Photo taken on August 17, 1978. Barney Peterson/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

7 of 104 You celebrated St. Patrick's Day at the Snake Races. In this photo, snake chaser, Steven Holt of Pacifica cheers on his snake "Sir Hiss" for the title "Fastest snake in the West" during the 20th annual St. Patrick's Day snake race in San Francisco. Undated AP photo, ca. 1970's. Show More Show Less

8 of 104 You went for live jazz at Keystone Korner. Jazz musician Sam Rivers performs at the North Beach club in 1977 Tom Copi/Getty Images Show More Show Less

10 of 104 You pet Charlie O at an Oakland A's game. The mule was the team mascot, named after the team's owner Charlie O. Finley at the time. In this photo, Charlie O gets a hat during Bald-Headed Day at the Oakland Coliseum. The mule died in 1976. Tom Levy / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember when the Muni tracks were installed near Duboce Triangle. Duboce near Church 1970s track installation, view west up Duboce. Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org.

Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org Show More Show Less

13 of 104 You remember the "mummy wrap" tapestry being draped over the Transamerica Pyramid Building. Nothing was safe from being macrame'd in the 1970's. April 29, 1974. Dave Randolph/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

14 of 104 You rode the Parkmobile through Golden Gate Park. Photo taken June 30, 1972. Greg Peterson/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

16 of 104 You brought your sled to the Snow-Ball. San Francisco Ice Company spread 17 tons of snow for the annual "Snow-Ball." Pictured is then Mayor Diane Feinstein giving a sledder a start. December 28, 1978. Clem Albers/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

17 of 104 You paid 25 cents to ride Muni. It cost 25 cents to ride the train throughout most of the 1970's. Photo of San Francisco Muni buses on Castro and 17th Streets, September 30, 1979. Clem Albers/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

19 of 104 You remember the White Night Riots. In this photo, San Francisco Police try to restore order at City Hall during the protests and riots that took place after the Dan White Verdict May 21 1979 John Storey / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

20 of 104 You remember the day Charles Mason was convicted. His followers committed a series of nine murders at four locations in 1969. Manson was convicted in 1971 of first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder for the deaths of seven people, all of which were carried out at his instruction by members of the group. He was also convicted of first-degree murder for two other killings. Uncredited/Associated Press Show More Show Less

22 of 104 You went to the Musee Mechanique when it was on the lower level of the Cliff House. The collection of more than 150 antique mechanical amusements has since moved to a location at Fisherman's Wharf. JERRY TELFER Show More Show Less

23 of 104 You listened to "The Emperor" Gene Nelson on KYA. He ruled the radio waves in the 60s and 70s. In this photo, he's receiving the Bay Area Radio Hall of Fame award and pictured with DJ Celeste Perry Courtesy Ben Fong-Torres Show More Show Less

25 of 104 You remember listened to Lon Simmons (left) broadcast Giant's games on KSFO. Simmons is pictured with Joe Angel in the San Francisco Giants broadcast booth on July 12, 1978. Terry Schmitt/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

26 of 104 You remember when Muni buses looked like this. In this 1975 photo, a New San Francisco Muni bus stands in front of an old Muni bus. Chronicle archives Show More Show Less

28 of 104 You'll never forget the Oakland A's World Series run. The team won three consecutive World Championships between 1972 and 1974, led by memorable players including Catfish Hunter, Reggie Jackson, ace reliever Rollie Fingers, and colorful owner Charlie O. Finley. (Photo: Pitcher Ken Holtzman, of the Oakland As, hurls a pitch towards a Mets batter in fifth inning, of the first game of the World Series, Saturday, Oct. 13, 1973, Oakland, Calif.) Anonymous/ASSOCIATED PRESS Show More Show Less

29 of 104 You were a huge fan of the local band Journey—and their big hair. You saw them play at Golden Gate Park and maybe you were even lucky enough to go to high school with Neal Schon (pictured far left). Courtesy Colombia Records Show More Show Less

31 of 104 You saw Willie Mays hit a homer at Candlestick Park. Mays played for the Giants until 1972, and famously got career hit No. 3000 in the second inning of the Giants' game against the Montreal Expos on July 18, 1970. Focus On Sport/Focus on Sport/Getty Images Show More Show Less

32 of 104 You remember the opening of BART and feared traveling through an underwater tube. The Bay Area transportation system officially opened on Sept. 11, 1972, initially between the MacArther and Fremont stations. The Transbay Tube opened in 1974. Train failures were common in BART's early days. In this photo, patrons enter the Oakland City Center BART station on the opening day. Charles B. Peterson/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You wore groovy clothes. Polyester was the material of choice and bright colors dominated. In this 1971 photo, a man wears matching pants and sweater. In the background, you can see the U.S. Mint and Hotel Pickwick. A commenter identified the vintage cars as (from left): a 1968-72 Opel Kadett (B) wagon, 1962 Mercury Comet, 1971 Plymouth Fury and behind the Fury, a '68-69 Buick Skylark.

35 of 104 You saw Dianne Feinstein pose in a Sutro Baths bathing suit at the opening of Pier 39. Feinstein was the President of the Board of Supervisors at the time, and wore the suit at the opening after losing a bet that the tourism center would open on time. The park opened on October 4, 1978. Jerry Telfer/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember trips across the Bay Bridge with no traffic. You also remember the old eastern span. This photo was taken on the western span in 1971.

38 of 104 You were a fan of the Dead Kennedys. This punk rock band formed in San Francisco in 1978 and became known for its politically charged songs. They frequently played at the North Beach nightclub Mabuhay Gardens. Their name was controversial. San Francisco Chronicle columnist Herb Caen wrote in November 1978, "Just when you think tastelessness has reached its nadir, along comes a punk rock group called 'The Dead Kennedys', which will play at Mabuhay Gardens on Nov. 22, the 15th anniversary of John F. Kennedy's assassination." (Pictured: Jello Biafra of the Dead Kennedys) John O'Hara/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

40 of 104 You remember Candlestick Park with AstroTurf. The natural bluegrass was torn up and the AstroTurf rolled out in 1970. The real grass returned again following the 1978 football season. This photo shows a stolen Piece of AstroTurf at Candlestick Park on Dec. 12, 1978. Show More Show Less

41 of 104 You were an activist. You marched in protests and mourned the loss of trailblazing leader and Supervisor Harvey Milk, who was the first openly gay man elected to public office in America. This photo is from December 1978 on the the wall of the Bank of America at Castro and Market. (Photo: (c) Jerry Pritikin) Jerry Pritikin Show More Show Less

You rode the cable car with friends—and didn't take selfies. Riding the cable car was was pretty much the same experience for tourists of 1971 as it is today—although fares cost less, lines were shorter and nobody was taking dozens of photos.

44 of 104 You'll never forget the day it snowed: Feb. 5, 1976. It was a rare San Francisco snow day, and the white stuff actually stuck to the ground. Clem Albers/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember Grimes Poznikoff, aka "The Human Jukebox." He was a fixture on Fisherman's Wharf in the 1970s and 80s, and waited in a cardboard refrigerator box until someone gave him a donation and requested a song. Then he'd pop out of the front flap and play the song on a trumpet, kazoo or other random instrument. Here he's pictured circa 1978.

You never saw Carol Doda perform live—but you knew who she was. America's first public topless dancer was a huge draw in North Beach in the '60s and '70s.

49 of 104 You always went to Monkey Island first on visits to the San Francisco Zoo. It was damaged in the 1989 earthquake and razed and paved over. Express-News archives Show More Show Less

You feared the "Zodiac" killer. The Zodiac killer is blamed for at least five murders in 1968 and 1969 in the San Francisco Bay Area. Though other serial killers have had more victims, the "Zodiac" intrigued and terrified the public with his mysterious ways. He sent suspected letters to the Vallejo Times Herald, San Francisco Chronicle and other newspapers as late as 1974, warning he'd strike again. He was never caught, though many, including author Robert Graysmith, believe he was Arthur Leigh Allen, a Vallejo man who who died in 1992.

You stopped to listen to the many musicians and buskers on city streets. Back then you actually stopped to listen because you weren't wearing headphones and listing to your playlist on your phone as you walked by. This street musician strums and sings for tips at Pier 45 on Fisherman's Wharf in 1971. Behind him is the now-demolished Tait's at the Wharf.

53 of 104 You learned to drive in the parking lot of the White Front discount variety store. This store's massive parking lot was the perfect place for teenagers to learn to drive. "All my friends learned to drive there," wrote one S.F. local in the Facebook group San Francisco Remembered. White Front was a cross between a Kohl's and a dollar store and the one in S.F. was located at 16th and Bryant streets, the current location of the SoMa Safeway. (Note: This photo is pre-70s and was taken on Dec. 17, 1968) Art Frisch/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

55 of 104 You stayed up late to watch Bob Wilkins on "Creature Features." The cigar-wielding host introduced underground flicks with titles like "Attack of the Mushroom People" on the late-night movie show airing on KTVU's Channel 2 through the 1970s. In this photo, Wilkins sits with co-host John Stanley. KQED Show More Show Less

56 of 104 Buy Photo You feasted on Blum's Coffee Crunch Cake. This heavenly dessert was invented by Ernest Weil, the operations manager of the late bakery soda fountain chain, Blum's, with a location in the basement of the downtown Macy's. (Note: The photo features a modern-day re-creation of the cake.) Liz Hafalia/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

58 of 104 You ate hot dogs at a Doggie Diner. At one point there were more than two dozen in the Bay Area. The last one closed in 1986. Its founder Al Ross died in 2010, at age 93. RIP Doggie Diner. (Susan Ehmer / The Chronicle 1978) Show More Show Less

59 of 104 You mourned the closing of Playland-at-the-Beach in 1972. In this photo, Bill Smit, 74, rides a Playland-at-the-Beach carousel horse one more time on the day before the ride went up for auction. Clem Albers / Clem Albers / The Chronicle 1972 Show More Show Less

61 of 104 You appreciated Dr. Don Rose's corny one-liners on KFRC "The Big 610." Dr. Rose's top-40 show was No. 1 rated virtually from its 1973 start until the station changed to a big band format in 1986. ho Show More Show Less

You shopped for jewelry from the stalls lining Fisherman's Wharf. This was an era of craftspeople and many sold their goods around the city. Photo taken circa 1978.

64 of 104 Your swim team coach was Charlie Sava. He coached Olympic Swimmer Ann Curtis and hundreds of other S.F. kids. Photo taken on Aug. 13, 1987 of Ann Curtis, Charlie Sava and Wendy Nelder at the dedication of the Charlie Sava Pool in the Sunset District. Sava died on his way to work at the pool in 1987. (Pete Breinig / The Chronicle) Show More Show Less

65 of 104 You listened to KYA Radio. And you remember the Matthew's TV and Stereo commercials: "Top of the hill, Daly City!" KYA Show More Show Less

67 of 104 You saw a Day on the Green concert at the Oakland Coliseum. Presented by promotor Bill Graham, the lineup in the 70s was extraordinary: Led Zeppelin, Grateful Dead, The Beach Boys, Eagles, Fleetwood Mac and The Who (pictured). Michael Zagaris/Reel Art Press Show More Show Less

68 of 104 You ate many hard-roll sandwiches from Panelli Brothers Deli. The brothers closed their North Beach establishment in 2002 after 82 years in business. Show More Show Less

70 of 104 You bought your vinyl at Tower Records. You also lined up at the music store for concert tickets. Pictured: Tower Records at Bay Street and Columbus Avenue in San Francisco: Once thriving -- and noisy -- it's now out of business. Chris Hardy/SFC Show More Show Less

71 of 104 You rode the Ferris wheel atop Emporium during the holidays. A holiday tradition at The Emporium was the roof rides which were hoisted onto the roofs of both The Emporium downtown and Stonestown stores each year. Photographer unknown Show More Show Less

You remember the Embarcadero Freeway. The double-decker stretch of highway was demolished after the Loma Prieta Earthquake in 1989.

74 of 104 You chowed down on French fries at Kerry's Lounge and Restaurant. It was located on Army Street near Van Ness and stayed open 24 hours. Chris Stewart/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

76 of 104 You watched Robert Shields perform with his mime, Lorene Yarnell. Here he is pictured at Ghirardelli Square, January 13, 1975 Stephanie Maze/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You rode an electric green-and-white bus to school. Here's the 9-Richland Line Electric Bus #859 pictured at Murray and Crescent on August 1976. Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org.

Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org Show More Show Less

79 of 104 You remember when a scene from "The Streets of San Francisco" was shot on your block. The crime drama starring Karl Malden, right, and Michael Douglas as detectives ran for five seasons between 1972 and 1977. Unlike today's shows that are mostly shot in Hollywood sets, this show was almost entirely shot on location in San Francisco. Courtesy ABC TV/1975/AP Show More Show Less

You saw the Grateful Dead play at Winterland. Here Drummers Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart perform on New Year's Eve 1977 with The Dead at Winterland. Lighting up behind the drummers are Phil Lesh, Bill Graham, Ken Kesey and roadie Steve Parrish.

82 of 104 You saw "Star Wars" at the Coronet. The theater at the corner of Geary Boulevard and Arguello Avenue was torn down to build senior housing. In this photo taken on May 28, 1977, movie-goers are getting out of the the 1 p.m. show show of "Star Wars" on opening day. The film went on to make more than $2 million in six months at the theater. Show More Show Less

You traveled to Berkeley to buy your tie-dye on Telegraph Avenue. The trend stared in the 1960s and carried over into the 70s. This photo was taken in 1971 by photographer Nick DeWolf who traveled from Boston to the Bay Area to take photographs of the 1970s Bay Area.

85 of 104 You remember the smell of pot during the Laserium shows at the Morrison Planetarium at the California Academy of Sciences. The psychedelic rock planetarium show ran from 1974 to 2000. Pink Floyd, The Beatles and The Doors were favorite shows. Chronicle archives Show More Show Less

86 of 104 Listening to jazz on the bandstand at Earthquake McGoon's. Turk Murphy's Jazz Band, pictured, were favorites at this venue. Barney Peterson/Chronicle File Show More Show Less

88 of 104 You ate late-night at Zim's Hamburgers. This location pictured at 19th and Taraval was "closed for renovation" in August 1978, but in reality there was a strike. Jerry Telfer/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

89 of 104 You celebrated a birthday at the Hippo on Van Ness. Remember the Hippo burger, the thick shakes and sweet birthday cakes? Susan Gilbert/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

91 of 104 You stared up in awe at the living Christmas tree under the dome in the City of Paris Department store. In this photo, mannequins on the second floor get a good view of the tree that rises to the top of the rotunda in San Francisco's City of Paris Department Store, Nov. 20, 1972. Joe Rosenthal/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

92 of 104 You remember the opening of St. Mary's Cathedral. Here the church on Cathedral Hill is pictured during construction on Aug. 26, 1969. The cathedral replaced one of the same name that was built in 1891 and burned in 1962. Stan Creighton/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

94 of 104 You rented roller skates in Golden Gate Park. In this December 1977 photo, a roller skate rental truck rents skates at the corner of Fulton Street and Eighth Avenue near Golden Gate Park. John Storey/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

95 of 104 You devoured a burger at Bill's Place. This Richmond spot on Clement Street is still going. All of its burgers are named after S.F. celebrities and the meat is ground fresh daily. (File photo) Show More Show Less

97 of 104 You remember the old California Academy of Sciences. The building was damaged in the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and was relocated downtown to a temporary location before reopening after a complete overhaul in 2008. Peter Breinig/The Chronicle, 1984 Show More Show Less

You remember the buildings that burned on Alcatraz during the Indian occupation. The small island, formerly the location of a prison, was occupied by Native American activists between 1969 and 1971. This photo of the Alcatraz warden's house and lighthouse was taken a year after the mansion burned during the Indian occupation. The entire island was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.

You remember when O.J. Simpson played for the 49ers. Simpson played for the 49ers from 1978-79. He's now better known for his trial and acquittal for the murders of his former wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman.

Focus On Sport/Getty Images Show More Show Less

101 of 104 You jumped into the mosh pit at Mabuhay Gardens. This North Beach punk rock nightclub booked two bands a night seven days a week in its late-70s heyday. Frequent gigs were played by local bands the Avengers, Dead Kennedys, The Nuns, Crime, Dils, Pearl Harbor and the Explosions, the Tubes and Wall of Voodoo. The club's operator Dirksen also booked everyone from Iggy Pop and The Ramones to the Go Go's. Richard McCaffrey/Getty Images Show More Show Less

103 of 104 Tower Records at Columbus and Bay in San Francisco is seen in a file photo. Chris Hardy/SFC Show More Show Less

The 1970s in San Francisco were flamboyant, alive, full of color and passion, marked by dark periods and electric highs.

To grow up in San Francisco in this prismatic era was extraordinary, and anyone who spent their early years here in the 1970s has vivid memories swirling around in the mind.

In the gallery above, we try to capture some, and we thank the Facebook page San Francisco Remembered and its active and knowledgeable community who helped create this list.

The Summer of Love was over, but the free-loving hippie spirit prevailed, and bohemians, buskers, bongo-drum players and jewelry makers thronged the city.


50 things people who grew up in 1970s San Francisco will remember

You chowed down on French fries at Kerry's Lounge and Restaurant: The restaurant was on Army Street (now Cesar Chavez) near Van Ness.

Chris Stewart / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

2 of 104 You saw KISS at the Cow Palace—the night Elvis died. This tough-looking group is in the building for a 1977 KISS concert - notable because the band was at the peak of their popularity, and it was the night Elvis died. KISS acknowledged the event, playing a special edition of "Jailhouse Rock." Chronicle photographer Stephanie Maze wisely photographed the crowd even more than the band, capturing youth in the 1970s perfectly. Stephanie Maze/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

4 of 104 You saw the Blue Angels at Moffett Field. In this photo the Blue Angels bunched up for a final pass over Highway 101, as they landed at Moffett Field after a practice run around the San Francisco bay area in the 1970s. CHP shut the freeway down for the Angels practice. (Photo by Gary Fong) Gary Fong/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

5 of 104 You remember the hippies hanging out in Golden Gate Park. And you longed to join them. Photo taken on August 17, 1978. Barney Peterson/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

7 of 104 You celebrated St. Patrick's Day at the Snake Races. In this photo, snake chaser, Steven Holt of Pacifica cheers on his snake "Sir Hiss" for the title "Fastest snake in the West" during the 20th annual St. Patrick's Day snake race in San Francisco. Undated AP photo, ca. 1970's. Show More Show Less

8 of 104 You went for live jazz at Keystone Korner. Jazz musician Sam Rivers performs at the North Beach club in 1977 Tom Copi/Getty Images Show More Show Less

10 of 104 You pet Charlie O at an Oakland A's game. The mule was the team mascot, named after the team's owner Charlie O. Finley at the time. In this photo, Charlie O gets a hat during Bald-Headed Day at the Oakland Coliseum. The mule died in 1976. Tom Levy / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember when the Muni tracks were installed near Duboce Triangle. Duboce near Church 1970s track installation, view west up Duboce. Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org.

Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org Show More Show Less

13 of 104 You remember the "mummy wrap" tapestry being draped over the Transamerica Pyramid Building. Nothing was safe from being macrame'd in the 1970's. April 29, 1974. Dave Randolph/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

14 of 104 You rode the Parkmobile through Golden Gate Park. Photo taken June 30, 1972. Greg Peterson/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

16 of 104 You brought your sled to the Snow-Ball. San Francisco Ice Company spread 17 tons of snow for the annual "Snow-Ball." Pictured is then Mayor Diane Feinstein giving a sledder a start. December 28, 1978. Clem Albers/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

17 of 104 You paid 25 cents to ride Muni. It cost 25 cents to ride the train throughout most of the 1970's. Photo of San Francisco Muni buses on Castro and 17th Streets, September 30, 1979. Clem Albers/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

19 of 104 You remember the White Night Riots. In this photo, San Francisco Police try to restore order at City Hall during the protests and riots that took place after the Dan White Verdict May 21 1979 John Storey / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

20 of 104 You remember the day Charles Mason was convicted. His followers committed a series of nine murders at four locations in 1969. Manson was convicted in 1971 of first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder for the deaths of seven people, all of which were carried out at his instruction by members of the group. He was also convicted of first-degree murder for two other killings. Uncredited/Associated Press Show More Show Less

22 of 104 You went to the Musee Mechanique when it was on the lower level of the Cliff House. The collection of more than 150 antique mechanical amusements has since moved to a location at Fisherman's Wharf. JERRY TELFER Show More Show Less

23 of 104 You listened to "The Emperor" Gene Nelson on KYA. He ruled the radio waves in the 60s and 70s. In this photo, he's receiving the Bay Area Radio Hall of Fame award and pictured with DJ Celeste Perry Courtesy Ben Fong-Torres Show More Show Less

25 of 104 You remember listened to Lon Simmons (left) broadcast Giant's games on KSFO. Simmons is pictured with Joe Angel in the San Francisco Giants broadcast booth on July 12, 1978. Terry Schmitt/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

26 of 104 You remember when Muni buses looked like this. In this 1975 photo, a New San Francisco Muni bus stands in front of an old Muni bus. Chronicle archives Show More Show Less

28 of 104 You'll never forget the Oakland A's World Series run. The team won three consecutive World Championships between 1972 and 1974, led by memorable players including Catfish Hunter, Reggie Jackson, ace reliever Rollie Fingers, and colorful owner Charlie O. Finley. (Photo: Pitcher Ken Holtzman, of the Oakland As, hurls a pitch towards a Mets batter in fifth inning, of the first game of the World Series, Saturday, Oct. 13, 1973, Oakland, Calif.) Anonymous/ASSOCIATED PRESS Show More Show Less

29 of 104 You were a huge fan of the local band Journey—and their big hair. You saw them play at Golden Gate Park and maybe you were even lucky enough to go to high school with Neal Schon (pictured far left). Courtesy Colombia Records Show More Show Less

31 of 104 You saw Willie Mays hit a homer at Candlestick Park. Mays played for the Giants until 1972, and famously got career hit No. 3000 in the second inning of the Giants' game against the Montreal Expos on July 18, 1970. Focus On Sport/Focus on Sport/Getty Images Show More Show Less

32 of 104 You remember the opening of BART and feared traveling through an underwater tube. The Bay Area transportation system officially opened on Sept. 11, 1972, initially between the MacArther and Fremont stations. The Transbay Tube opened in 1974. Train failures were common in BART's early days. In this photo, patrons enter the Oakland City Center BART station on the opening day. Charles B. Peterson/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You wore groovy clothes. Polyester was the material of choice and bright colors dominated. In this 1971 photo, a man wears matching pants and sweater. In the background, you can see the U.S. Mint and Hotel Pickwick. A commenter identified the vintage cars as (from left): a 1968-72 Opel Kadett (B) wagon, 1962 Mercury Comet, 1971 Plymouth Fury and behind the Fury, a '68-69 Buick Skylark.

35 of 104 You saw Dianne Feinstein pose in a Sutro Baths bathing suit at the opening of Pier 39. Feinstein was the President of the Board of Supervisors at the time, and wore the suit at the opening after losing a bet that the tourism center would open on time. The park opened on October 4, 1978. Jerry Telfer/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember trips across the Bay Bridge with no traffic. You also remember the old eastern span. This photo was taken on the western span in 1971.

38 of 104 You were a fan of the Dead Kennedys. This punk rock band formed in San Francisco in 1978 and became known for its politically charged songs. They frequently played at the North Beach nightclub Mabuhay Gardens. Their name was controversial. San Francisco Chronicle columnist Herb Caen wrote in November 1978, "Just when you think tastelessness has reached its nadir, along comes a punk rock group called 'The Dead Kennedys', which will play at Mabuhay Gardens on Nov. 22, the 15th anniversary of John F. Kennedy's assassination." (Pictured: Jello Biafra of the Dead Kennedys) John O'Hara/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

40 of 104 You remember Candlestick Park with AstroTurf. The natural bluegrass was torn up and the AstroTurf rolled out in 1970. The real grass returned again following the 1978 football season. This photo shows a stolen Piece of AstroTurf at Candlestick Park on Dec. 12, 1978. Show More Show Less

41 of 104 You were an activist. You marched in protests and mourned the loss of trailblazing leader and Supervisor Harvey Milk, who was the first openly gay man elected to public office in America. This photo is from December 1978 on the the wall of the Bank of America at Castro and Market. (Photo: (c) Jerry Pritikin) Jerry Pritikin Show More Show Less

You rode the cable car with friends—and didn't take selfies. Riding the cable car was was pretty much the same experience for tourists of 1971 as it is today—although fares cost less, lines were shorter and nobody was taking dozens of photos.

44 of 104 You'll never forget the day it snowed: Feb. 5, 1976. It was a rare San Francisco snow day, and the white stuff actually stuck to the ground. Clem Albers/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember Grimes Poznikoff, aka "The Human Jukebox." He was a fixture on Fisherman's Wharf in the 1970s and 80s, and waited in a cardboard refrigerator box until someone gave him a donation and requested a song. Then he'd pop out of the front flap and play the song on a trumpet, kazoo or other random instrument. Here he's pictured circa 1978.

You never saw Carol Doda perform live—but you knew who she was. America's first public topless dancer was a huge draw in North Beach in the '60s and '70s.

49 of 104 You always went to Monkey Island first on visits to the San Francisco Zoo. It was damaged in the 1989 earthquake and razed and paved over. Express-News archives Show More Show Less

You feared the "Zodiac" killer. The Zodiac killer is blamed for at least five murders in 1968 and 1969 in the San Francisco Bay Area. Though other serial killers have had more victims, the "Zodiac" intrigued and terrified the public with his mysterious ways. He sent suspected letters to the Vallejo Times Herald, San Francisco Chronicle and other newspapers as late as 1974, warning he'd strike again. He was never caught, though many, including author Robert Graysmith, believe he was Arthur Leigh Allen, a Vallejo man who who died in 1992.

You stopped to listen to the many musicians and buskers on city streets. Back then you actually stopped to listen because you weren't wearing headphones and listing to your playlist on your phone as you walked by. This street musician strums and sings for tips at Pier 45 on Fisherman's Wharf in 1971. Behind him is the now-demolished Tait's at the Wharf.

53 of 104 You learned to drive in the parking lot of the White Front discount variety store. This store's massive parking lot was the perfect place for teenagers to learn to drive. "All my friends learned to drive there," wrote one S.F. local in the Facebook group San Francisco Remembered. White Front was a cross between a Kohl's and a dollar store and the one in S.F. was located at 16th and Bryant streets, the current location of the SoMa Safeway. (Note: This photo is pre-70s and was taken on Dec. 17, 1968) Art Frisch/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

55 of 104 You stayed up late to watch Bob Wilkins on "Creature Features." The cigar-wielding host introduced underground flicks with titles like "Attack of the Mushroom People" on the late-night movie show airing on KTVU's Channel 2 through the 1970s. In this photo, Wilkins sits with co-host John Stanley. KQED Show More Show Less

56 of 104 Buy Photo You feasted on Blum's Coffee Crunch Cake. This heavenly dessert was invented by Ernest Weil, the operations manager of the late bakery soda fountain chain, Blum's, with a location in the basement of the downtown Macy's. (Note: The photo features a modern-day re-creation of the cake.) Liz Hafalia/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

58 of 104 You ate hot dogs at a Doggie Diner. At one point there were more than two dozen in the Bay Area. The last one closed in 1986. Its founder Al Ross died in 2010, at age 93. RIP Doggie Diner. (Susan Ehmer / The Chronicle 1978) Show More Show Less

59 of 104 You mourned the closing of Playland-at-the-Beach in 1972. In this photo, Bill Smit, 74, rides a Playland-at-the-Beach carousel horse one more time on the day before the ride went up for auction. Clem Albers / Clem Albers / The Chronicle 1972 Show More Show Less

61 of 104 You appreciated Dr. Don Rose's corny one-liners on KFRC "The Big 610." Dr. Rose's top-40 show was No. 1 rated virtually from its 1973 start until the station changed to a big band format in 1986. ho Show More Show Less

You shopped for jewelry from the stalls lining Fisherman's Wharf. This was an era of craftspeople and many sold their goods around the city. Photo taken circa 1978.

64 of 104 Your swim team coach was Charlie Sava. He coached Olympic Swimmer Ann Curtis and hundreds of other S.F. kids. Photo taken on Aug. 13, 1987 of Ann Curtis, Charlie Sava and Wendy Nelder at the dedication of the Charlie Sava Pool in the Sunset District. Sava died on his way to work at the pool in 1987. (Pete Breinig / The Chronicle) Show More Show Less

65 of 104 You listened to KYA Radio. And you remember the Matthew's TV and Stereo commercials: "Top of the hill, Daly City!" KYA Show More Show Less

67 of 104 You saw a Day on the Green concert at the Oakland Coliseum. Presented by promotor Bill Graham, the lineup in the 70s was extraordinary: Led Zeppelin, Grateful Dead, The Beach Boys, Eagles, Fleetwood Mac and The Who (pictured). Michael Zagaris/Reel Art Press Show More Show Less

68 of 104 You ate many hard-roll sandwiches from Panelli Brothers Deli. The brothers closed their North Beach establishment in 2002 after 82 years in business. Show More Show Less

70 of 104 You bought your vinyl at Tower Records. You also lined up at the music store for concert tickets. Pictured: Tower Records at Bay Street and Columbus Avenue in San Francisco: Once thriving -- and noisy -- it's now out of business. Chris Hardy/SFC Show More Show Less

71 of 104 You rode the Ferris wheel atop Emporium during the holidays. A holiday tradition at The Emporium was the roof rides which were hoisted onto the roofs of both The Emporium downtown and Stonestown stores each year. Photographer unknown Show More Show Less

You remember the Embarcadero Freeway. The double-decker stretch of highway was demolished after the Loma Prieta Earthquake in 1989.

74 of 104 You chowed down on French fries at Kerry's Lounge and Restaurant. It was located on Army Street near Van Ness and stayed open 24 hours. Chris Stewart/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

76 of 104 You watched Robert Shields perform with his mime, Lorene Yarnell. Here he is pictured at Ghirardelli Square, January 13, 1975 Stephanie Maze/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You rode an electric green-and-white bus to school. Here's the 9-Richland Line Electric Bus #859 pictured at Murray and Crescent on August 1976. Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org.

Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org Show More Show Less

79 of 104 You remember when a scene from "The Streets of San Francisco" was shot on your block. The crime drama starring Karl Malden, right, and Michael Douglas as detectives ran for five seasons between 1972 and 1977. Unlike today's shows that are mostly shot in Hollywood sets, this show was almost entirely shot on location in San Francisco. Courtesy ABC TV/1975/AP Show More Show Less

You saw the Grateful Dead play at Winterland. Here Drummers Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart perform on New Year's Eve 1977 with The Dead at Winterland. Lighting up behind the drummers are Phil Lesh, Bill Graham, Ken Kesey and roadie Steve Parrish.

82 of 104 You saw "Star Wars" at the Coronet. The theater at the corner of Geary Boulevard and Arguello Avenue was torn down to build senior housing. In this photo taken on May 28, 1977, movie-goers are getting out of the the 1 p.m. show show of "Star Wars" on opening day. The film went on to make more than $2 million in six months at the theater. Show More Show Less

You traveled to Berkeley to buy your tie-dye on Telegraph Avenue. The trend stared in the 1960s and carried over into the 70s. This photo was taken in 1971 by photographer Nick DeWolf who traveled from Boston to the Bay Area to take photographs of the 1970s Bay Area.

85 of 104 You remember the smell of pot during the Laserium shows at the Morrison Planetarium at the California Academy of Sciences. The psychedelic rock planetarium show ran from 1974 to 2000. Pink Floyd, The Beatles and The Doors were favorite shows. Chronicle archives Show More Show Less

86 of 104 Listening to jazz on the bandstand at Earthquake McGoon's. Turk Murphy's Jazz Band, pictured, were favorites at this venue. Barney Peterson/Chronicle File Show More Show Less

88 of 104 You ate late-night at Zim's Hamburgers. This location pictured at 19th and Taraval was "closed for renovation" in August 1978, but in reality there was a strike. Jerry Telfer/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

89 of 104 You celebrated a birthday at the Hippo on Van Ness. Remember the Hippo burger, the thick shakes and sweet birthday cakes? Susan Gilbert/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

91 of 104 You stared up in awe at the living Christmas tree under the dome in the City of Paris Department store. In this photo, mannequins on the second floor get a good view of the tree that rises to the top of the rotunda in San Francisco's City of Paris Department Store, Nov. 20, 1972. Joe Rosenthal/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

92 of 104 You remember the opening of St. Mary's Cathedral. Here the church on Cathedral Hill is pictured during construction on Aug. 26, 1969. The cathedral replaced one of the same name that was built in 1891 and burned in 1962. Stan Creighton/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

94 of 104 You rented roller skates in Golden Gate Park. In this December 1977 photo, a roller skate rental truck rents skates at the corner of Fulton Street and Eighth Avenue near Golden Gate Park. John Storey/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

95 of 104 You devoured a burger at Bill's Place. This Richmond spot on Clement Street is still going. All of its burgers are named after S.F. celebrities and the meat is ground fresh daily. (File photo) Show More Show Less

97 of 104 You remember the old California Academy of Sciences. The building was damaged in the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and was relocated downtown to a temporary location before reopening after a complete overhaul in 2008. Peter Breinig/The Chronicle, 1984 Show More Show Less

You remember the buildings that burned on Alcatraz during the Indian occupation. The small island, formerly the location of a prison, was occupied by Native American activists between 1969 and 1971. This photo of the Alcatraz warden's house and lighthouse was taken a year after the mansion burned during the Indian occupation. The entire island was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.

You remember when O.J. Simpson played for the 49ers. Simpson played for the 49ers from 1978-79. He's now better known for his trial and acquittal for the murders of his former wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman.

Focus On Sport/Getty Images Show More Show Less

101 of 104 You jumped into the mosh pit at Mabuhay Gardens. This North Beach punk rock nightclub booked two bands a night seven days a week in its late-70s heyday. Frequent gigs were played by local bands the Avengers, Dead Kennedys, The Nuns, Crime, Dils, Pearl Harbor and the Explosions, the Tubes and Wall of Voodoo. The club's operator Dirksen also booked everyone from Iggy Pop and The Ramones to the Go Go's. Richard McCaffrey/Getty Images Show More Show Less

103 of 104 Tower Records at Columbus and Bay in San Francisco is seen in a file photo. Chris Hardy/SFC Show More Show Less

The 1970s in San Francisco were flamboyant, alive, full of color and passion, marked by dark periods and electric highs.

To grow up in San Francisco in this prismatic era was extraordinary, and anyone who spent their early years here in the 1970s has vivid memories swirling around in the mind.

In the gallery above, we try to capture some, and we thank the Facebook page San Francisco Remembered and its active and knowledgeable community who helped create this list.

The Summer of Love was over, but the free-loving hippie spirit prevailed, and bohemians, buskers, bongo-drum players and jewelry makers thronged the city.


50 things people who grew up in 1970s San Francisco will remember

You chowed down on French fries at Kerry's Lounge and Restaurant: The restaurant was on Army Street (now Cesar Chavez) near Van Ness.

Chris Stewart / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

2 of 104 You saw KISS at the Cow Palace—the night Elvis died. This tough-looking group is in the building for a 1977 KISS concert - notable because the band was at the peak of their popularity, and it was the night Elvis died. KISS acknowledged the event, playing a special edition of "Jailhouse Rock." Chronicle photographer Stephanie Maze wisely photographed the crowd even more than the band, capturing youth in the 1970s perfectly. Stephanie Maze/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

4 of 104 You saw the Blue Angels at Moffett Field. In this photo the Blue Angels bunched up for a final pass over Highway 101, as they landed at Moffett Field after a practice run around the San Francisco bay area in the 1970s. CHP shut the freeway down for the Angels practice. (Photo by Gary Fong) Gary Fong/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

5 of 104 You remember the hippies hanging out in Golden Gate Park. And you longed to join them. Photo taken on August 17, 1978. Barney Peterson/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

7 of 104 You celebrated St. Patrick's Day at the Snake Races. In this photo, snake chaser, Steven Holt of Pacifica cheers on his snake "Sir Hiss" for the title "Fastest snake in the West" during the 20th annual St. Patrick's Day snake race in San Francisco. Undated AP photo, ca. 1970's. Show More Show Less

8 of 104 You went for live jazz at Keystone Korner. Jazz musician Sam Rivers performs at the North Beach club in 1977 Tom Copi/Getty Images Show More Show Less

10 of 104 You pet Charlie O at an Oakland A's game. The mule was the team mascot, named after the team's owner Charlie O. Finley at the time. In this photo, Charlie O gets a hat during Bald-Headed Day at the Oakland Coliseum. The mule died in 1976. Tom Levy / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember when the Muni tracks were installed near Duboce Triangle. Duboce near Church 1970s track installation, view west up Duboce. Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org.

Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org Show More Show Less

13 of 104 You remember the "mummy wrap" tapestry being draped over the Transamerica Pyramid Building. Nothing was safe from being macrame'd in the 1970's. April 29, 1974. Dave Randolph/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

14 of 104 You rode the Parkmobile through Golden Gate Park. Photo taken June 30, 1972. Greg Peterson/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

16 of 104 You brought your sled to the Snow-Ball. San Francisco Ice Company spread 17 tons of snow for the annual "Snow-Ball." Pictured is then Mayor Diane Feinstein giving a sledder a start. December 28, 1978. Clem Albers/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

17 of 104 You paid 25 cents to ride Muni. It cost 25 cents to ride the train throughout most of the 1970's. Photo of San Francisco Muni buses on Castro and 17th Streets, September 30, 1979. Clem Albers/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

19 of 104 You remember the White Night Riots. In this photo, San Francisco Police try to restore order at City Hall during the protests and riots that took place after the Dan White Verdict May 21 1979 John Storey / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

20 of 104 You remember the day Charles Mason was convicted. His followers committed a series of nine murders at four locations in 1969. Manson was convicted in 1971 of first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder for the deaths of seven people, all of which were carried out at his instruction by members of the group. He was also convicted of first-degree murder for two other killings. Uncredited/Associated Press Show More Show Less

22 of 104 You went to the Musee Mechanique when it was on the lower level of the Cliff House. The collection of more than 150 antique mechanical amusements has since moved to a location at Fisherman's Wharf. JERRY TELFER Show More Show Less

23 of 104 You listened to "The Emperor" Gene Nelson on KYA. He ruled the radio waves in the 60s and 70s. In this photo, he's receiving the Bay Area Radio Hall of Fame award and pictured with DJ Celeste Perry Courtesy Ben Fong-Torres Show More Show Less

25 of 104 You remember listened to Lon Simmons (left) broadcast Giant's games on KSFO. Simmons is pictured with Joe Angel in the San Francisco Giants broadcast booth on July 12, 1978. Terry Schmitt/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

26 of 104 You remember when Muni buses looked like this. In this 1975 photo, a New San Francisco Muni bus stands in front of an old Muni bus. Chronicle archives Show More Show Less

28 of 104 You'll never forget the Oakland A's World Series run. The team won three consecutive World Championships between 1972 and 1974, led by memorable players including Catfish Hunter, Reggie Jackson, ace reliever Rollie Fingers, and colorful owner Charlie O. Finley. (Photo: Pitcher Ken Holtzman, of the Oakland As, hurls a pitch towards a Mets batter in fifth inning, of the first game of the World Series, Saturday, Oct. 13, 1973, Oakland, Calif.) Anonymous/ASSOCIATED PRESS Show More Show Less

29 of 104 You were a huge fan of the local band Journey—and their big hair. You saw them play at Golden Gate Park and maybe you were even lucky enough to go to high school with Neal Schon (pictured far left). Courtesy Colombia Records Show More Show Less

31 of 104 You saw Willie Mays hit a homer at Candlestick Park. Mays played for the Giants until 1972, and famously got career hit No. 3000 in the second inning of the Giants' game against the Montreal Expos on July 18, 1970. Focus On Sport/Focus on Sport/Getty Images Show More Show Less

32 of 104 You remember the opening of BART and feared traveling through an underwater tube. The Bay Area transportation system officially opened on Sept. 11, 1972, initially between the MacArther and Fremont stations. The Transbay Tube opened in 1974. Train failures were common in BART's early days. In this photo, patrons enter the Oakland City Center BART station on the opening day. Charles B. Peterson/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You wore groovy clothes. Polyester was the material of choice and bright colors dominated. In this 1971 photo, a man wears matching pants and sweater. In the background, you can see the U.S. Mint and Hotel Pickwick. A commenter identified the vintage cars as (from left): a 1968-72 Opel Kadett (B) wagon, 1962 Mercury Comet, 1971 Plymouth Fury and behind the Fury, a '68-69 Buick Skylark.

35 of 104 You saw Dianne Feinstein pose in a Sutro Baths bathing suit at the opening of Pier 39. Feinstein was the President of the Board of Supervisors at the time, and wore the suit at the opening after losing a bet that the tourism center would open on time. The park opened on October 4, 1978. Jerry Telfer/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember trips across the Bay Bridge with no traffic. You also remember the old eastern span. This photo was taken on the western span in 1971.

38 of 104 You were a fan of the Dead Kennedys. This punk rock band formed in San Francisco in 1978 and became known for its politically charged songs. They frequently played at the North Beach nightclub Mabuhay Gardens. Their name was controversial. San Francisco Chronicle columnist Herb Caen wrote in November 1978, "Just when you think tastelessness has reached its nadir, along comes a punk rock group called 'The Dead Kennedys', which will play at Mabuhay Gardens on Nov. 22, the 15th anniversary of John F. Kennedy's assassination." (Pictured: Jello Biafra of the Dead Kennedys) John O'Hara/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

40 of 104 You remember Candlestick Park with AstroTurf. The natural bluegrass was torn up and the AstroTurf rolled out in 1970. The real grass returned again following the 1978 football season. This photo shows a stolen Piece of AstroTurf at Candlestick Park on Dec. 12, 1978. Show More Show Less

41 of 104 You were an activist. You marched in protests and mourned the loss of trailblazing leader and Supervisor Harvey Milk, who was the first openly gay man elected to public office in America. This photo is from December 1978 on the the wall of the Bank of America at Castro and Market. (Photo: (c) Jerry Pritikin) Jerry Pritikin Show More Show Less

You rode the cable car with friends—and didn't take selfies. Riding the cable car was was pretty much the same experience for tourists of 1971 as it is today—although fares cost less, lines were shorter and nobody was taking dozens of photos.

44 of 104 You'll never forget the day it snowed: Feb. 5, 1976. It was a rare San Francisco snow day, and the white stuff actually stuck to the ground. Clem Albers/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember Grimes Poznikoff, aka "The Human Jukebox." He was a fixture on Fisherman's Wharf in the 1970s and 80s, and waited in a cardboard refrigerator box until someone gave him a donation and requested a song. Then he'd pop out of the front flap and play the song on a trumpet, kazoo or other random instrument. Here he's pictured circa 1978.

You never saw Carol Doda perform live—but you knew who she was. America's first public topless dancer was a huge draw in North Beach in the '60s and '70s.

49 of 104 You always went to Monkey Island first on visits to the San Francisco Zoo. It was damaged in the 1989 earthquake and razed and paved over. Express-News archives Show More Show Less

You feared the "Zodiac" killer. The Zodiac killer is blamed for at least five murders in 1968 and 1969 in the San Francisco Bay Area. Though other serial killers have had more victims, the "Zodiac" intrigued and terrified the public with his mysterious ways. He sent suspected letters to the Vallejo Times Herald, San Francisco Chronicle and other newspapers as late as 1974, warning he'd strike again. He was never caught, though many, including author Robert Graysmith, believe he was Arthur Leigh Allen, a Vallejo man who who died in 1992.

You stopped to listen to the many musicians and buskers on city streets. Back then you actually stopped to listen because you weren't wearing headphones and listing to your playlist on your phone as you walked by. This street musician strums and sings for tips at Pier 45 on Fisherman's Wharf in 1971. Behind him is the now-demolished Tait's at the Wharf.

53 of 104 You learned to drive in the parking lot of the White Front discount variety store. This store's massive parking lot was the perfect place for teenagers to learn to drive. "All my friends learned to drive there," wrote one S.F. local in the Facebook group San Francisco Remembered. White Front was a cross between a Kohl's and a dollar store and the one in S.F. was located at 16th and Bryant streets, the current location of the SoMa Safeway. (Note: This photo is pre-70s and was taken on Dec. 17, 1968) Art Frisch/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

55 of 104 You stayed up late to watch Bob Wilkins on "Creature Features." The cigar-wielding host introduced underground flicks with titles like "Attack of the Mushroom People" on the late-night movie show airing on KTVU's Channel 2 through the 1970s. In this photo, Wilkins sits with co-host John Stanley. KQED Show More Show Less

56 of 104 Buy Photo You feasted on Blum's Coffee Crunch Cake. This heavenly dessert was invented by Ernest Weil, the operations manager of the late bakery soda fountain chain, Blum's, with a location in the basement of the downtown Macy's. (Note: The photo features a modern-day re-creation of the cake.) Liz Hafalia/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

58 of 104 You ate hot dogs at a Doggie Diner. At one point there were more than two dozen in the Bay Area. The last one closed in 1986. Its founder Al Ross died in 2010, at age 93. RIP Doggie Diner. (Susan Ehmer / The Chronicle 1978) Show More Show Less

59 of 104 You mourned the closing of Playland-at-the-Beach in 1972. In this photo, Bill Smit, 74, rides a Playland-at-the-Beach carousel horse one more time on the day before the ride went up for auction. Clem Albers / Clem Albers / The Chronicle 1972 Show More Show Less

61 of 104 You appreciated Dr. Don Rose's corny one-liners on KFRC "The Big 610." Dr. Rose's top-40 show was No. 1 rated virtually from its 1973 start until the station changed to a big band format in 1986. ho Show More Show Less

You shopped for jewelry from the stalls lining Fisherman's Wharf. This was an era of craftspeople and many sold their goods around the city. Photo taken circa 1978.

64 of 104 Your swim team coach was Charlie Sava. He coached Olympic Swimmer Ann Curtis and hundreds of other S.F. kids. Photo taken on Aug. 13, 1987 of Ann Curtis, Charlie Sava and Wendy Nelder at the dedication of the Charlie Sava Pool in the Sunset District. Sava died on his way to work at the pool in 1987. (Pete Breinig / The Chronicle) Show More Show Less

65 of 104 You listened to KYA Radio. And you remember the Matthew's TV and Stereo commercials: "Top of the hill, Daly City!" KYA Show More Show Less

67 of 104 You saw a Day on the Green concert at the Oakland Coliseum. Presented by promotor Bill Graham, the lineup in the 70s was extraordinary: Led Zeppelin, Grateful Dead, The Beach Boys, Eagles, Fleetwood Mac and The Who (pictured). Michael Zagaris/Reel Art Press Show More Show Less

68 of 104 You ate many hard-roll sandwiches from Panelli Brothers Deli. The brothers closed their North Beach establishment in 2002 after 82 years in business. Show More Show Less

70 of 104 You bought your vinyl at Tower Records. You also lined up at the music store for concert tickets. Pictured: Tower Records at Bay Street and Columbus Avenue in San Francisco: Once thriving -- and noisy -- it's now out of business. Chris Hardy/SFC Show More Show Less

71 of 104 You rode the Ferris wheel atop Emporium during the holidays. A holiday tradition at The Emporium was the roof rides which were hoisted onto the roofs of both The Emporium downtown and Stonestown stores each year. Photographer unknown Show More Show Less

You remember the Embarcadero Freeway. The double-decker stretch of highway was demolished after the Loma Prieta Earthquake in 1989.

74 of 104 You chowed down on French fries at Kerry's Lounge and Restaurant. It was located on Army Street near Van Ness and stayed open 24 hours. Chris Stewart/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

76 of 104 You watched Robert Shields perform with his mime, Lorene Yarnell. Here he is pictured at Ghirardelli Square, January 13, 1975 Stephanie Maze/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You rode an electric green-and-white bus to school. Here's the 9-Richland Line Electric Bus #859 pictured at Murray and Crescent on August 1976. Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org.

Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org Show More Show Less

79 of 104 You remember when a scene from "The Streets of San Francisco" was shot on your block. The crime drama starring Karl Malden, right, and Michael Douglas as detectives ran for five seasons between 1972 and 1977. Unlike today's shows that are mostly shot in Hollywood sets, this show was almost entirely shot on location in San Francisco. Courtesy ABC TV/1975/AP Show More Show Less

You saw the Grateful Dead play at Winterland. Here Drummers Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart perform on New Year's Eve 1977 with The Dead at Winterland. Lighting up behind the drummers are Phil Lesh, Bill Graham, Ken Kesey and roadie Steve Parrish.

82 of 104 You saw "Star Wars" at the Coronet. The theater at the corner of Geary Boulevard and Arguello Avenue was torn down to build senior housing. In this photo taken on May 28, 1977, movie-goers are getting out of the the 1 p.m. show show of "Star Wars" on opening day. The film went on to make more than $2 million in six months at the theater. Show More Show Less

You traveled to Berkeley to buy your tie-dye on Telegraph Avenue. The trend stared in the 1960s and carried over into the 70s. This photo was taken in 1971 by photographer Nick DeWolf who traveled from Boston to the Bay Area to take photographs of the 1970s Bay Area.

85 of 104 You remember the smell of pot during the Laserium shows at the Morrison Planetarium at the California Academy of Sciences. The psychedelic rock planetarium show ran from 1974 to 2000. Pink Floyd, The Beatles and The Doors were favorite shows. Chronicle archives Show More Show Less

86 of 104 Listening to jazz on the bandstand at Earthquake McGoon's. Turk Murphy's Jazz Band, pictured, were favorites at this venue. Barney Peterson/Chronicle File Show More Show Less

88 of 104 You ate late-night at Zim's Hamburgers. This location pictured at 19th and Taraval was "closed for renovation" in August 1978, but in reality there was a strike. Jerry Telfer/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

89 of 104 You celebrated a birthday at the Hippo on Van Ness. Remember the Hippo burger, the thick shakes and sweet birthday cakes? Susan Gilbert/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

91 of 104 You stared up in awe at the living Christmas tree under the dome in the City of Paris Department store. In this photo, mannequins on the second floor get a good view of the tree that rises to the top of the rotunda in San Francisco's City of Paris Department Store, Nov. 20, 1972. Joe Rosenthal/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

92 of 104 You remember the opening of St. Mary's Cathedral. Here the church on Cathedral Hill is pictured during construction on Aug. 26, 1969. The cathedral replaced one of the same name that was built in 1891 and burned in 1962. Stan Creighton/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

94 of 104 You rented roller skates in Golden Gate Park. In this December 1977 photo, a roller skate rental truck rents skates at the corner of Fulton Street and Eighth Avenue near Golden Gate Park. John Storey/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

95 of 104 You devoured a burger at Bill's Place. This Richmond spot on Clement Street is still going. All of its burgers are named after S.F. celebrities and the meat is ground fresh daily. (File photo) Show More Show Less

97 of 104 You remember the old California Academy of Sciences. The building was damaged in the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and was relocated downtown to a temporary location before reopening after a complete overhaul in 2008. Peter Breinig/The Chronicle, 1984 Show More Show Less

You remember the buildings that burned on Alcatraz during the Indian occupation. The small island, formerly the location of a prison, was occupied by Native American activists between 1969 and 1971. This photo of the Alcatraz warden's house and lighthouse was taken a year after the mansion burned during the Indian occupation. The entire island was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.

You remember when O.J. Simpson played for the 49ers. Simpson played for the 49ers from 1978-79. He's now better known for his trial and acquittal for the murders of his former wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman.

Focus On Sport/Getty Images Show More Show Less

101 of 104 You jumped into the mosh pit at Mabuhay Gardens. This North Beach punk rock nightclub booked two bands a night seven days a week in its late-70s heyday. Frequent gigs were played by local bands the Avengers, Dead Kennedys, The Nuns, Crime, Dils, Pearl Harbor and the Explosions, the Tubes and Wall of Voodoo. The club's operator Dirksen also booked everyone from Iggy Pop and The Ramones to the Go Go's. Richard McCaffrey/Getty Images Show More Show Less

103 of 104 Tower Records at Columbus and Bay in San Francisco is seen in a file photo. Chris Hardy/SFC Show More Show Less

The 1970s in San Francisco were flamboyant, alive, full of color and passion, marked by dark periods and electric highs.

To grow up in San Francisco in this prismatic era was extraordinary, and anyone who spent their early years here in the 1970s has vivid memories swirling around in the mind.

In the gallery above, we try to capture some, and we thank the Facebook page San Francisco Remembered and its active and knowledgeable community who helped create this list.

The Summer of Love was over, but the free-loving hippie spirit prevailed, and bohemians, buskers, bongo-drum players and jewelry makers thronged the city.


50 things people who grew up in 1970s San Francisco will remember

You chowed down on French fries at Kerry's Lounge and Restaurant: The restaurant was on Army Street (now Cesar Chavez) near Van Ness.

Chris Stewart / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

2 of 104 You saw KISS at the Cow Palace—the night Elvis died. This tough-looking group is in the building for a 1977 KISS concert - notable because the band was at the peak of their popularity, and it was the night Elvis died. KISS acknowledged the event, playing a special edition of "Jailhouse Rock." Chronicle photographer Stephanie Maze wisely photographed the crowd even more than the band, capturing youth in the 1970s perfectly. Stephanie Maze/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

4 of 104 You saw the Blue Angels at Moffett Field. In this photo the Blue Angels bunched up for a final pass over Highway 101, as they landed at Moffett Field after a practice run around the San Francisco bay area in the 1970s. CHP shut the freeway down for the Angels practice. (Photo by Gary Fong) Gary Fong/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

5 of 104 You remember the hippies hanging out in Golden Gate Park. And you longed to join them. Photo taken on August 17, 1978. Barney Peterson/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

7 of 104 You celebrated St. Patrick's Day at the Snake Races. In this photo, snake chaser, Steven Holt of Pacifica cheers on his snake "Sir Hiss" for the title "Fastest snake in the West" during the 20th annual St. Patrick's Day snake race in San Francisco. Undated AP photo, ca. 1970's. Show More Show Less

8 of 104 You went for live jazz at Keystone Korner. Jazz musician Sam Rivers performs at the North Beach club in 1977 Tom Copi/Getty Images Show More Show Less

10 of 104 You pet Charlie O at an Oakland A's game. The mule was the team mascot, named after the team's owner Charlie O. Finley at the time. In this photo, Charlie O gets a hat during Bald-Headed Day at the Oakland Coliseum. The mule died in 1976. Tom Levy / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember when the Muni tracks were installed near Duboce Triangle. Duboce near Church 1970s track installation, view west up Duboce. Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org.

Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org Show More Show Less

13 of 104 You remember the "mummy wrap" tapestry being draped over the Transamerica Pyramid Building. Nothing was safe from being macrame'd in the 1970's. April 29, 1974. Dave Randolph/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

14 of 104 You rode the Parkmobile through Golden Gate Park. Photo taken June 30, 1972. Greg Peterson/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

16 of 104 You brought your sled to the Snow-Ball. San Francisco Ice Company spread 17 tons of snow for the annual "Snow-Ball." Pictured is then Mayor Diane Feinstein giving a sledder a start. December 28, 1978. Clem Albers/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

17 of 104 You paid 25 cents to ride Muni. It cost 25 cents to ride the train throughout most of the 1970's. Photo of San Francisco Muni buses on Castro and 17th Streets, September 30, 1979. Clem Albers/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

19 of 104 You remember the White Night Riots. In this photo, San Francisco Police try to restore order at City Hall during the protests and riots that took place after the Dan White Verdict May 21 1979 John Storey / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

20 of 104 You remember the day Charles Mason was convicted. His followers committed a series of nine murders at four locations in 1969. Manson was convicted in 1971 of first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder for the deaths of seven people, all of which were carried out at his instruction by members of the group. He was also convicted of first-degree murder for two other killings. Uncredited/Associated Press Show More Show Less

22 of 104 You went to the Musee Mechanique when it was on the lower level of the Cliff House. The collection of more than 150 antique mechanical amusements has since moved to a location at Fisherman's Wharf. JERRY TELFER Show More Show Less

23 of 104 You listened to "The Emperor" Gene Nelson on KYA. He ruled the radio waves in the 60s and 70s. In this photo, he's receiving the Bay Area Radio Hall of Fame award and pictured with DJ Celeste Perry Courtesy Ben Fong-Torres Show More Show Less

25 of 104 You remember listened to Lon Simmons (left) broadcast Giant's games on KSFO. Simmons is pictured with Joe Angel in the San Francisco Giants broadcast booth on July 12, 1978. Terry Schmitt/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

26 of 104 You remember when Muni buses looked like this. In this 1975 photo, a New San Francisco Muni bus stands in front of an old Muni bus. Chronicle archives Show More Show Less

28 of 104 You'll never forget the Oakland A's World Series run. The team won three consecutive World Championships between 1972 and 1974, led by memorable players including Catfish Hunter, Reggie Jackson, ace reliever Rollie Fingers, and colorful owner Charlie O. Finley. (Photo: Pitcher Ken Holtzman, of the Oakland As, hurls a pitch towards a Mets batter in fifth inning, of the first game of the World Series, Saturday, Oct. 13, 1973, Oakland, Calif.) Anonymous/ASSOCIATED PRESS Show More Show Less

29 of 104 You were a huge fan of the local band Journey—and their big hair. You saw them play at Golden Gate Park and maybe you were even lucky enough to go to high school with Neal Schon (pictured far left). Courtesy Colombia Records Show More Show Less

31 of 104 You saw Willie Mays hit a homer at Candlestick Park. Mays played for the Giants until 1972, and famously got career hit No. 3000 in the second inning of the Giants' game against the Montreal Expos on July 18, 1970. Focus On Sport/Focus on Sport/Getty Images Show More Show Less

32 of 104 You remember the opening of BART and feared traveling through an underwater tube. The Bay Area transportation system officially opened on Sept. 11, 1972, initially between the MacArther and Fremont stations. The Transbay Tube opened in 1974. Train failures were common in BART's early days. In this photo, patrons enter the Oakland City Center BART station on the opening day. Charles B. Peterson/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You wore groovy clothes. Polyester was the material of choice and bright colors dominated. In this 1971 photo, a man wears matching pants and sweater. In the background, you can see the U.S. Mint and Hotel Pickwick. A commenter identified the vintage cars as (from left): a 1968-72 Opel Kadett (B) wagon, 1962 Mercury Comet, 1971 Plymouth Fury and behind the Fury, a '68-69 Buick Skylark.

35 of 104 You saw Dianne Feinstein pose in a Sutro Baths bathing suit at the opening of Pier 39. Feinstein was the President of the Board of Supervisors at the time, and wore the suit at the opening after losing a bet that the tourism center would open on time. The park opened on October 4, 1978. Jerry Telfer/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember trips across the Bay Bridge with no traffic. You also remember the old eastern span. This photo was taken on the western span in 1971.

38 of 104 You were a fan of the Dead Kennedys. This punk rock band formed in San Francisco in 1978 and became known for its politically charged songs. They frequently played at the North Beach nightclub Mabuhay Gardens. Their name was controversial. San Francisco Chronicle columnist Herb Caen wrote in November 1978, "Just when you think tastelessness has reached its nadir, along comes a punk rock group called 'The Dead Kennedys', which will play at Mabuhay Gardens on Nov. 22, the 15th anniversary of John F. Kennedy's assassination." (Pictured: Jello Biafra of the Dead Kennedys) John O'Hara/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

40 of 104 You remember Candlestick Park with AstroTurf. The natural bluegrass was torn up and the AstroTurf rolled out in 1970. The real grass returned again following the 1978 football season. This photo shows a stolen Piece of AstroTurf at Candlestick Park on Dec. 12, 1978. Show More Show Less

41 of 104 You were an activist. You marched in protests and mourned the loss of trailblazing leader and Supervisor Harvey Milk, who was the first openly gay man elected to public office in America. This photo is from December 1978 on the the wall of the Bank of America at Castro and Market. (Photo: (c) Jerry Pritikin) Jerry Pritikin Show More Show Less

You rode the cable car with friends—and didn't take selfies. Riding the cable car was was pretty much the same experience for tourists of 1971 as it is today—although fares cost less, lines were shorter and nobody was taking dozens of photos.

44 of 104 You'll never forget the day it snowed: Feb. 5, 1976. It was a rare San Francisco snow day, and the white stuff actually stuck to the ground. Clem Albers/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember Grimes Poznikoff, aka "The Human Jukebox." He was a fixture on Fisherman's Wharf in the 1970s and 80s, and waited in a cardboard refrigerator box until someone gave him a donation and requested a song. Then he'd pop out of the front flap and play the song on a trumpet, kazoo or other random instrument. Here he's pictured circa 1978.

You never saw Carol Doda perform live—but you knew who she was. America's first public topless dancer was a huge draw in North Beach in the '60s and '70s.

49 of 104 You always went to Monkey Island first on visits to the San Francisco Zoo. It was damaged in the 1989 earthquake and razed and paved over. Express-News archives Show More Show Less

You feared the "Zodiac" killer. The Zodiac killer is blamed for at least five murders in 1968 and 1969 in the San Francisco Bay Area. Though other serial killers have had more victims, the "Zodiac" intrigued and terrified the public with his mysterious ways. He sent suspected letters to the Vallejo Times Herald, San Francisco Chronicle and other newspapers as late as 1974, warning he'd strike again. He was never caught, though many, including author Robert Graysmith, believe he was Arthur Leigh Allen, a Vallejo man who who died in 1992.

You stopped to listen to the many musicians and buskers on city streets. Back then you actually stopped to listen because you weren't wearing headphones and listing to your playlist on your phone as you walked by. This street musician strums and sings for tips at Pier 45 on Fisherman's Wharf in 1971. Behind him is the now-demolished Tait's at the Wharf.

53 of 104 You learned to drive in the parking lot of the White Front discount variety store. This store's massive parking lot was the perfect place for teenagers to learn to drive. "All my friends learned to drive there," wrote one S.F. local in the Facebook group San Francisco Remembered. White Front was a cross between a Kohl's and a dollar store and the one in S.F. was located at 16th and Bryant streets, the current location of the SoMa Safeway. (Note: This photo is pre-70s and was taken on Dec. 17, 1968) Art Frisch/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

55 of 104 You stayed up late to watch Bob Wilkins on "Creature Features." The cigar-wielding host introduced underground flicks with titles like "Attack of the Mushroom People" on the late-night movie show airing on KTVU's Channel 2 through the 1970s. In this photo, Wilkins sits with co-host John Stanley. KQED Show More Show Less

56 of 104 Buy Photo You feasted on Blum's Coffee Crunch Cake. This heavenly dessert was invented by Ernest Weil, the operations manager of the late bakery soda fountain chain, Blum's, with a location in the basement of the downtown Macy's. (Note: The photo features a modern-day re-creation of the cake.) Liz Hafalia/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

58 of 104 You ate hot dogs at a Doggie Diner. At one point there were more than two dozen in the Bay Area. The last one closed in 1986. Its founder Al Ross died in 2010, at age 93. RIP Doggie Diner. (Susan Ehmer / The Chronicle 1978) Show More Show Less

59 of 104 You mourned the closing of Playland-at-the-Beach in 1972. In this photo, Bill Smit, 74, rides a Playland-at-the-Beach carousel horse one more time on the day before the ride went up for auction. Clem Albers / Clem Albers / The Chronicle 1972 Show More Show Less

61 of 104 You appreciated Dr. Don Rose's corny one-liners on KFRC "The Big 610." Dr. Rose's top-40 show was No. 1 rated virtually from its 1973 start until the station changed to a big band format in 1986. ho Show More Show Less

You shopped for jewelry from the stalls lining Fisherman's Wharf. This was an era of craftspeople and many sold their goods around the city. Photo taken circa 1978.

64 of 104 Your swim team coach was Charlie Sava. He coached Olympic Swimmer Ann Curtis and hundreds of other S.F. kids. Photo taken on Aug. 13, 1987 of Ann Curtis, Charlie Sava and Wendy Nelder at the dedication of the Charlie Sava Pool in the Sunset District. Sava died on his way to work at the pool in 1987. (Pete Breinig / The Chronicle) Show More Show Less

65 of 104 You listened to KYA Radio. And you remember the Matthew's TV and Stereo commercials: "Top of the hill, Daly City!" KYA Show More Show Less

67 of 104 You saw a Day on the Green concert at the Oakland Coliseum. Presented by promotor Bill Graham, the lineup in the 70s was extraordinary: Led Zeppelin, Grateful Dead, The Beach Boys, Eagles, Fleetwood Mac and The Who (pictured). Michael Zagaris/Reel Art Press Show More Show Less

68 of 104 You ate many hard-roll sandwiches from Panelli Brothers Deli. The brothers closed their North Beach establishment in 2002 after 82 years in business. Show More Show Less

70 of 104 You bought your vinyl at Tower Records. You also lined up at the music store for concert tickets. Pictured: Tower Records at Bay Street and Columbus Avenue in San Francisco: Once thriving -- and noisy -- it's now out of business. Chris Hardy/SFC Show More Show Less

71 of 104 You rode the Ferris wheel atop Emporium during the holidays. A holiday tradition at The Emporium was the roof rides which were hoisted onto the roofs of both The Emporium downtown and Stonestown stores each year. Photographer unknown Show More Show Less

You remember the Embarcadero Freeway. The double-decker stretch of highway was demolished after the Loma Prieta Earthquake in 1989.

74 of 104 You chowed down on French fries at Kerry's Lounge and Restaurant. It was located on Army Street near Van Ness and stayed open 24 hours. Chris Stewart/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

76 of 104 You watched Robert Shields perform with his mime, Lorene Yarnell. Here he is pictured at Ghirardelli Square, January 13, 1975 Stephanie Maze/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You rode an electric green-and-white bus to school. Here's the 9-Richland Line Electric Bus #859 pictured at Murray and Crescent on August 1976. Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org.

Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org Show More Show Less

79 of 104 You remember when a scene from "The Streets of San Francisco" was shot on your block. The crime drama starring Karl Malden, right, and Michael Douglas as detectives ran for five seasons between 1972 and 1977. Unlike today's shows that are mostly shot in Hollywood sets, this show was almost entirely shot on location in San Francisco. Courtesy ABC TV/1975/AP Show More Show Less

You saw the Grateful Dead play at Winterland. Here Drummers Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart perform on New Year's Eve 1977 with The Dead at Winterland. Lighting up behind the drummers are Phil Lesh, Bill Graham, Ken Kesey and roadie Steve Parrish.

82 of 104 You saw "Star Wars" at the Coronet. The theater at the corner of Geary Boulevard and Arguello Avenue was torn down to build senior housing. In this photo taken on May 28, 1977, movie-goers are getting out of the the 1 p.m. show show of "Star Wars" on opening day. The film went on to make more than $2 million in six months at the theater. Show More Show Less

You traveled to Berkeley to buy your tie-dye on Telegraph Avenue. The trend stared in the 1960s and carried over into the 70s. This photo was taken in 1971 by photographer Nick DeWolf who traveled from Boston to the Bay Area to take photographs of the 1970s Bay Area.

85 of 104 You remember the smell of pot during the Laserium shows at the Morrison Planetarium at the California Academy of Sciences. The psychedelic rock planetarium show ran from 1974 to 2000. Pink Floyd, The Beatles and The Doors were favorite shows. Chronicle archives Show More Show Less

86 of 104 Listening to jazz on the bandstand at Earthquake McGoon's. Turk Murphy's Jazz Band, pictured, were favorites at this venue. Barney Peterson/Chronicle File Show More Show Less

88 of 104 You ate late-night at Zim's Hamburgers. This location pictured at 19th and Taraval was "closed for renovation" in August 1978, but in reality there was a strike. Jerry Telfer/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

89 of 104 You celebrated a birthday at the Hippo on Van Ness. Remember the Hippo burger, the thick shakes and sweet birthday cakes? Susan Gilbert/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

91 of 104 You stared up in awe at the living Christmas tree under the dome in the City of Paris Department store. In this photo, mannequins on the second floor get a good view of the tree that rises to the top of the rotunda in San Francisco's City of Paris Department Store, Nov. 20, 1972. Joe Rosenthal/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

92 of 104 You remember the opening of St. Mary's Cathedral. Here the church on Cathedral Hill is pictured during construction on Aug. 26, 1969. The cathedral replaced one of the same name that was built in 1891 and burned in 1962. Stan Creighton/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

94 of 104 You rented roller skates in Golden Gate Park. In this December 1977 photo, a roller skate rental truck rents skates at the corner of Fulton Street and Eighth Avenue near Golden Gate Park. John Storey/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

95 of 104 You devoured a burger at Bill's Place. This Richmond spot on Clement Street is still going. All of its burgers are named after S.F. celebrities and the meat is ground fresh daily. (File photo) Show More Show Less

97 of 104 You remember the old California Academy of Sciences. The building was damaged in the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and was relocated downtown to a temporary location before reopening after a complete overhaul in 2008. Peter Breinig/The Chronicle, 1984 Show More Show Less

You remember the buildings that burned on Alcatraz during the Indian occupation. The small island, formerly the location of a prison, was occupied by Native American activists between 1969 and 1971. This photo of the Alcatraz warden's house and lighthouse was taken a year after the mansion burned during the Indian occupation. The entire island was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.

You remember when O.J. Simpson played for the 49ers. Simpson played for the 49ers from 1978-79. He's now better known for his trial and acquittal for the murders of his former wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman.

Focus On Sport/Getty Images Show More Show Less

101 of 104 You jumped into the mosh pit at Mabuhay Gardens. This North Beach punk rock nightclub booked two bands a night seven days a week in its late-70s heyday. Frequent gigs were played by local bands the Avengers, Dead Kennedys, The Nuns, Crime, Dils, Pearl Harbor and the Explosions, the Tubes and Wall of Voodoo. The club's operator Dirksen also booked everyone from Iggy Pop and The Ramones to the Go Go's. Richard McCaffrey/Getty Images Show More Show Less

103 of 104 Tower Records at Columbus and Bay in San Francisco is seen in a file photo. Chris Hardy/SFC Show More Show Less

The 1970s in San Francisco were flamboyant, alive, full of color and passion, marked by dark periods and electric highs.

To grow up in San Francisco in this prismatic era was extraordinary, and anyone who spent their early years here in the 1970s has vivid memories swirling around in the mind.

In the gallery above, we try to capture some, and we thank the Facebook page San Francisco Remembered and its active and knowledgeable community who helped create this list.

The Summer of Love was over, but the free-loving hippie spirit prevailed, and bohemians, buskers, bongo-drum players and jewelry makers thronged the city.


50 things people who grew up in 1970s San Francisco will remember

You chowed down on French fries at Kerry's Lounge and Restaurant: The restaurant was on Army Street (now Cesar Chavez) near Van Ness.

Chris Stewart / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

2 of 104 You saw KISS at the Cow Palace—the night Elvis died. This tough-looking group is in the building for a 1977 KISS concert - notable because the band was at the peak of their popularity, and it was the night Elvis died. KISS acknowledged the event, playing a special edition of "Jailhouse Rock." Chronicle photographer Stephanie Maze wisely photographed the crowd even more than the band, capturing youth in the 1970s perfectly. Stephanie Maze/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

4 of 104 You saw the Blue Angels at Moffett Field. In this photo the Blue Angels bunched up for a final pass over Highway 101, as they landed at Moffett Field after a practice run around the San Francisco bay area in the 1970s. CHP shut the freeway down for the Angels practice. (Photo by Gary Fong) Gary Fong/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

5 of 104 You remember the hippies hanging out in Golden Gate Park. And you longed to join them. Photo taken on August 17, 1978. Barney Peterson/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

7 of 104 You celebrated St. Patrick's Day at the Snake Races. In this photo, snake chaser, Steven Holt of Pacifica cheers on his snake "Sir Hiss" for the title "Fastest snake in the West" during the 20th annual St. Patrick's Day snake race in San Francisco. Undated AP photo, ca. 1970's. Show More Show Less

8 of 104 You went for live jazz at Keystone Korner. Jazz musician Sam Rivers performs at the North Beach club in 1977 Tom Copi/Getty Images Show More Show Less

10 of 104 You pet Charlie O at an Oakland A's game. The mule was the team mascot, named after the team's owner Charlie O. Finley at the time. In this photo, Charlie O gets a hat during Bald-Headed Day at the Oakland Coliseum. The mule died in 1976. Tom Levy / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember when the Muni tracks were installed near Duboce Triangle. Duboce near Church 1970s track installation, view west up Duboce. Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org.

Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org Show More Show Less

13 of 104 You remember the "mummy wrap" tapestry being draped over the Transamerica Pyramid Building. Nothing was safe from being macrame'd in the 1970's. April 29, 1974. Dave Randolph/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

14 of 104 You rode the Parkmobile through Golden Gate Park. Photo taken June 30, 1972. Greg Peterson/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

16 of 104 You brought your sled to the Snow-Ball. San Francisco Ice Company spread 17 tons of snow for the annual "Snow-Ball." Pictured is then Mayor Diane Feinstein giving a sledder a start. December 28, 1978. Clem Albers/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

17 of 104 You paid 25 cents to ride Muni. It cost 25 cents to ride the train throughout most of the 1970's. Photo of San Francisco Muni buses on Castro and 17th Streets, September 30, 1979. Clem Albers/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

19 of 104 You remember the White Night Riots. In this photo, San Francisco Police try to restore order at City Hall during the protests and riots that took place after the Dan White Verdict May 21 1979 John Storey / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

20 of 104 You remember the day Charles Mason was convicted. His followers committed a series of nine murders at four locations in 1969. Manson was convicted in 1971 of first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder for the deaths of seven people, all of which were carried out at his instruction by members of the group. He was also convicted of first-degree murder for two other killings. Uncredited/Associated Press Show More Show Less

22 of 104 You went to the Musee Mechanique when it was on the lower level of the Cliff House. The collection of more than 150 antique mechanical amusements has since moved to a location at Fisherman's Wharf. JERRY TELFER Show More Show Less

23 of 104 You listened to "The Emperor" Gene Nelson on KYA. He ruled the radio waves in the 60s and 70s. In this photo, he's receiving the Bay Area Radio Hall of Fame award and pictured with DJ Celeste Perry Courtesy Ben Fong-Torres Show More Show Less

25 of 104 You remember listened to Lon Simmons (left) broadcast Giant's games on KSFO. Simmons is pictured with Joe Angel in the San Francisco Giants broadcast booth on July 12, 1978. Terry Schmitt/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

26 of 104 You remember when Muni buses looked like this. In this 1975 photo, a New San Francisco Muni bus stands in front of an old Muni bus. Chronicle archives Show More Show Less

28 of 104 You'll never forget the Oakland A's World Series run. The team won three consecutive World Championships between 1972 and 1974, led by memorable players including Catfish Hunter, Reggie Jackson, ace reliever Rollie Fingers, and colorful owner Charlie O. Finley. (Photo: Pitcher Ken Holtzman, of the Oakland As, hurls a pitch towards a Mets batter in fifth inning, of the first game of the World Series, Saturday, Oct. 13, 1973, Oakland, Calif.) Anonymous/ASSOCIATED PRESS Show More Show Less

29 of 104 You were a huge fan of the local band Journey—and their big hair. You saw them play at Golden Gate Park and maybe you were even lucky enough to go to high school with Neal Schon (pictured far left). Courtesy Colombia Records Show More Show Less

31 of 104 You saw Willie Mays hit a homer at Candlestick Park. Mays played for the Giants until 1972, and famously got career hit No. 3000 in the second inning of the Giants' game against the Montreal Expos on July 18, 1970. Focus On Sport/Focus on Sport/Getty Images Show More Show Less

32 of 104 You remember the opening of BART and feared traveling through an underwater tube. The Bay Area transportation system officially opened on Sept. 11, 1972, initially between the MacArther and Fremont stations. The Transbay Tube opened in 1974. Train failures were common in BART's early days. In this photo, patrons enter the Oakland City Center BART station on the opening day. Charles B. Peterson/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You wore groovy clothes. Polyester was the material of choice and bright colors dominated. In this 1971 photo, a man wears matching pants and sweater. In the background, you can see the U.S. Mint and Hotel Pickwick. A commenter identified the vintage cars as (from left): a 1968-72 Opel Kadett (B) wagon, 1962 Mercury Comet, 1971 Plymouth Fury and behind the Fury, a '68-69 Buick Skylark.

35 of 104 You saw Dianne Feinstein pose in a Sutro Baths bathing suit at the opening of Pier 39. Feinstein was the President of the Board of Supervisors at the time, and wore the suit at the opening after losing a bet that the tourism center would open on time. The park opened on October 4, 1978. Jerry Telfer/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember trips across the Bay Bridge with no traffic. You also remember the old eastern span. This photo was taken on the western span in 1971.

38 of 104 You were a fan of the Dead Kennedys. This punk rock band formed in San Francisco in 1978 and became known for its politically charged songs. They frequently played at the North Beach nightclub Mabuhay Gardens. Their name was controversial. San Francisco Chronicle columnist Herb Caen wrote in November 1978, "Just when you think tastelessness has reached its nadir, along comes a punk rock group called 'The Dead Kennedys', which will play at Mabuhay Gardens on Nov. 22, the 15th anniversary of John F. Kennedy's assassination." (Pictured: Jello Biafra of the Dead Kennedys) John O'Hara/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

40 of 104 You remember Candlestick Park with AstroTurf. The natural bluegrass was torn up and the AstroTurf rolled out in 1970. The real grass returned again following the 1978 football season. This photo shows a stolen Piece of AstroTurf at Candlestick Park on Dec. 12, 1978. Show More Show Less

41 of 104 You were an activist. You marched in protests and mourned the loss of trailblazing leader and Supervisor Harvey Milk, who was the first openly gay man elected to public office in America. This photo is from December 1978 on the the wall of the Bank of America at Castro and Market. (Photo: (c) Jerry Pritikin) Jerry Pritikin Show More Show Less

You rode the cable car with friends—and didn't take selfies. Riding the cable car was was pretty much the same experience for tourists of 1971 as it is today—although fares cost less, lines were shorter and nobody was taking dozens of photos.

44 of 104 You'll never forget the day it snowed: Feb. 5, 1976. It was a rare San Francisco snow day, and the white stuff actually stuck to the ground. Clem Albers/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember Grimes Poznikoff, aka "The Human Jukebox." He was a fixture on Fisherman's Wharf in the 1970s and 80s, and waited in a cardboard refrigerator box until someone gave him a donation and requested a song. Then he'd pop out of the front flap and play the song on a trumpet, kazoo or other random instrument. Here he's pictured circa 1978.

You never saw Carol Doda perform live—but you knew who she was. America's first public topless dancer was a huge draw in North Beach in the '60s and '70s.

49 of 104 You always went to Monkey Island first on visits to the San Francisco Zoo. It was damaged in the 1989 earthquake and razed and paved over. Express-News archives Show More Show Less

You feared the "Zodiac" killer. The Zodiac killer is blamed for at least five murders in 1968 and 1969 in the San Francisco Bay Area. Though other serial killers have had more victims, the "Zodiac" intrigued and terrified the public with his mysterious ways. He sent suspected letters to the Vallejo Times Herald, San Francisco Chronicle and other newspapers as late as 1974, warning he'd strike again. He was never caught, though many, including author Robert Graysmith, believe he was Arthur Leigh Allen, a Vallejo man who who died in 1992.

You stopped to listen to the many musicians and buskers on city streets. Back then you actually stopped to listen because you weren't wearing headphones and listing to your playlist on your phone as you walked by. This street musician strums and sings for tips at Pier 45 on Fisherman's Wharf in 1971. Behind him is the now-demolished Tait's at the Wharf.

53 of 104 You learned to drive in the parking lot of the White Front discount variety store. This store's massive parking lot was the perfect place for teenagers to learn to drive. "All my friends learned to drive there," wrote one S.F. local in the Facebook group San Francisco Remembered. White Front was a cross between a Kohl's and a dollar store and the one in S.F. was located at 16th and Bryant streets, the current location of the SoMa Safeway. (Note: This photo is pre-70s and was taken on Dec. 17, 1968) Art Frisch/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

55 of 104 You stayed up late to watch Bob Wilkins on "Creature Features." The cigar-wielding host introduced underground flicks with titles like "Attack of the Mushroom People" on the late-night movie show airing on KTVU's Channel 2 through the 1970s. In this photo, Wilkins sits with co-host John Stanley. KQED Show More Show Less

56 of 104 Buy Photo You feasted on Blum's Coffee Crunch Cake. This heavenly dessert was invented by Ernest Weil, the operations manager of the late bakery soda fountain chain, Blum's, with a location in the basement of the downtown Macy's. (Note: The photo features a modern-day re-creation of the cake.) Liz Hafalia/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

58 of 104 You ate hot dogs at a Doggie Diner. At one point there were more than two dozen in the Bay Area. The last one closed in 1986. Its founder Al Ross died in 2010, at age 93. RIP Doggie Diner. (Susan Ehmer / The Chronicle 1978) Show More Show Less

59 of 104 You mourned the closing of Playland-at-the-Beach in 1972. In this photo, Bill Smit, 74, rides a Playland-at-the-Beach carousel horse one more time on the day before the ride went up for auction. Clem Albers / Clem Albers / The Chronicle 1972 Show More Show Less

61 of 104 You appreciated Dr. Don Rose's corny one-liners on KFRC "The Big 610." Dr. Rose's top-40 show was No. 1 rated virtually from its 1973 start until the station changed to a big band format in 1986. ho Show More Show Less

You shopped for jewelry from the stalls lining Fisherman's Wharf. This was an era of craftspeople and many sold their goods around the city. Photo taken circa 1978.

64 of 104 Your swim team coach was Charlie Sava. He coached Olympic Swimmer Ann Curtis and hundreds of other S.F. kids. Photo taken on Aug. 13, 1987 of Ann Curtis, Charlie Sava and Wendy Nelder at the dedication of the Charlie Sava Pool in the Sunset District. Sava died on his way to work at the pool in 1987. (Pete Breinig / The Chronicle) Show More Show Less

65 of 104 You listened to KYA Radio. And you remember the Matthew's TV and Stereo commercials: "Top of the hill, Daly City!" KYA Show More Show Less

67 of 104 You saw a Day on the Green concert at the Oakland Coliseum. Presented by promotor Bill Graham, the lineup in the 70s was extraordinary: Led Zeppelin, Grateful Dead, The Beach Boys, Eagles, Fleetwood Mac and The Who (pictured). Michael Zagaris/Reel Art Press Show More Show Less

68 of 104 You ate many hard-roll sandwiches from Panelli Brothers Deli. The brothers closed their North Beach establishment in 2002 after 82 years in business. Show More Show Less

70 of 104 You bought your vinyl at Tower Records. You also lined up at the music store for concert tickets. Pictured: Tower Records at Bay Street and Columbus Avenue in San Francisco: Once thriving -- and noisy -- it's now out of business. Chris Hardy/SFC Show More Show Less

71 of 104 You rode the Ferris wheel atop Emporium during the holidays. A holiday tradition at The Emporium was the roof rides which were hoisted onto the roofs of both The Emporium downtown and Stonestown stores each year. Photographer unknown Show More Show Less

You remember the Embarcadero Freeway. The double-decker stretch of highway was demolished after the Loma Prieta Earthquake in 1989.

74 of 104 You chowed down on French fries at Kerry's Lounge and Restaurant. It was located on Army Street near Van Ness and stayed open 24 hours. Chris Stewart/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

76 of 104 You watched Robert Shields perform with his mime, Lorene Yarnell. Here he is pictured at Ghirardelli Square, January 13, 1975 Stephanie Maze/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You rode an electric green-and-white bus to school. Here's the 9-Richland Line Electric Bus #859 pictured at Murray and Crescent on August 1976. Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org.

Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org Show More Show Less

79 of 104 You remember when a scene from "The Streets of San Francisco" was shot on your block. The crime drama starring Karl Malden, right, and Michael Douglas as detectives ran for five seasons between 1972 and 1977. Unlike today's shows that are mostly shot in Hollywood sets, this show was almost entirely shot on location in San Francisco. Courtesy ABC TV/1975/AP Show More Show Less

You saw the Grateful Dead play at Winterland. Here Drummers Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart perform on New Year's Eve 1977 with The Dead at Winterland. Lighting up behind the drummers are Phil Lesh, Bill Graham, Ken Kesey and roadie Steve Parrish.

82 of 104 You saw "Star Wars" at the Coronet. The theater at the corner of Geary Boulevard and Arguello Avenue was torn down to build senior housing. In this photo taken on May 28, 1977, movie-goers are getting out of the the 1 p.m. show show of "Star Wars" on opening day. The film went on to make more than $2 million in six months at the theater. Show More Show Less

You traveled to Berkeley to buy your tie-dye on Telegraph Avenue. The trend stared in the 1960s and carried over into the 70s. This photo was taken in 1971 by photographer Nick DeWolf who traveled from Boston to the Bay Area to take photographs of the 1970s Bay Area.

85 of 104 You remember the smell of pot during the Laserium shows at the Morrison Planetarium at the California Academy of Sciences. The psychedelic rock planetarium show ran from 1974 to 2000. Pink Floyd, The Beatles and The Doors were favorite shows. Chronicle archives Show More Show Less

86 of 104 Listening to jazz on the bandstand at Earthquake McGoon's. Turk Murphy's Jazz Band, pictured, were favorites at this venue. Barney Peterson/Chronicle File Show More Show Less

88 of 104 You ate late-night at Zim's Hamburgers. This location pictured at 19th and Taraval was "closed for renovation" in August 1978, but in reality there was a strike. Jerry Telfer/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

89 of 104 You celebrated a birthday at the Hippo on Van Ness. Remember the Hippo burger, the thick shakes and sweet birthday cakes? Susan Gilbert/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

91 of 104 You stared up in awe at the living Christmas tree under the dome in the City of Paris Department store. In this photo, mannequins on the second floor get a good view of the tree that rises to the top of the rotunda in San Francisco's City of Paris Department Store, Nov. 20, 1972. Joe Rosenthal/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

92 of 104 You remember the opening of St. Mary's Cathedral. Here the church on Cathedral Hill is pictured during construction on Aug. 26, 1969. The cathedral replaced one of the same name that was built in 1891 and burned in 1962. Stan Creighton/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

94 of 104 You rented roller skates in Golden Gate Park. In this December 1977 photo, a roller skate rental truck rents skates at the corner of Fulton Street and Eighth Avenue near Golden Gate Park. John Storey/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

95 of 104 You devoured a burger at Bill's Place. This Richmond spot on Clement Street is still going. All of its burgers are named after S.F. celebrities and the meat is ground fresh daily. (File photo) Show More Show Less

97 of 104 You remember the old California Academy of Sciences. The building was damaged in the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and was relocated downtown to a temporary location before reopening after a complete overhaul in 2008. Peter Breinig/The Chronicle, 1984 Show More Show Less

You remember the buildings that burned on Alcatraz during the Indian occupation. The small island, formerly the location of a prison, was occupied by Native American activists between 1969 and 1971. This photo of the Alcatraz warden's house and lighthouse was taken a year after the mansion burned during the Indian occupation. The entire island was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.

You remember when O.J. Simpson played for the 49ers. Simpson played for the 49ers from 1978-79. He's now better known for his trial and acquittal for the murders of his former wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman.

Focus On Sport/Getty Images Show More Show Less

101 of 104 You jumped into the mosh pit at Mabuhay Gardens. This North Beach punk rock nightclub booked two bands a night seven days a week in its late-70s heyday. Frequent gigs were played by local bands the Avengers, Dead Kennedys, The Nuns, Crime, Dils, Pearl Harbor and the Explosions, the Tubes and Wall of Voodoo. The club's operator Dirksen also booked everyone from Iggy Pop and The Ramones to the Go Go's. Richard McCaffrey/Getty Images Show More Show Less

103 of 104 Tower Records at Columbus and Bay in San Francisco is seen in a file photo. Chris Hardy/SFC Show More Show Less

The 1970s in San Francisco were flamboyant, alive, full of color and passion, marked by dark periods and electric highs.

To grow up in San Francisco in this prismatic era was extraordinary, and anyone who spent their early years here in the 1970s has vivid memories swirling around in the mind.

In the gallery above, we try to capture some, and we thank the Facebook page San Francisco Remembered and its active and knowledgeable community who helped create this list.

The Summer of Love was over, but the free-loving hippie spirit prevailed, and bohemians, buskers, bongo-drum players and jewelry makers thronged the city.


50 things people who grew up in 1970s San Francisco will remember

You chowed down on French fries at Kerry's Lounge and Restaurant: The restaurant was on Army Street (now Cesar Chavez) near Van Ness.

Chris Stewart / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

2 of 104 You saw KISS at the Cow Palace—the night Elvis died. This tough-looking group is in the building for a 1977 KISS concert - notable because the band was at the peak of their popularity, and it was the night Elvis died. KISS acknowledged the event, playing a special edition of "Jailhouse Rock." Chronicle photographer Stephanie Maze wisely photographed the crowd even more than the band, capturing youth in the 1970s perfectly. Stephanie Maze/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

4 of 104 You saw the Blue Angels at Moffett Field. In this photo the Blue Angels bunched up for a final pass over Highway 101, as they landed at Moffett Field after a practice run around the San Francisco bay area in the 1970s. CHP shut the freeway down for the Angels practice. (Photo by Gary Fong) Gary Fong/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

5 of 104 You remember the hippies hanging out in Golden Gate Park. And you longed to join them. Photo taken on August 17, 1978. Barney Peterson/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

7 of 104 You celebrated St. Patrick's Day at the Snake Races. In this photo, snake chaser, Steven Holt of Pacifica cheers on his snake "Sir Hiss" for the title "Fastest snake in the West" during the 20th annual St. Patrick's Day snake race in San Francisco. Undated AP photo, ca. 1970's. Show More Show Less

8 of 104 You went for live jazz at Keystone Korner. Jazz musician Sam Rivers performs at the North Beach club in 1977 Tom Copi/Getty Images Show More Show Less

10 of 104 You pet Charlie O at an Oakland A's game. The mule was the team mascot, named after the team's owner Charlie O. Finley at the time. In this photo, Charlie O gets a hat during Bald-Headed Day at the Oakland Coliseum. The mule died in 1976. Tom Levy / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember when the Muni tracks were installed near Duboce Triangle. Duboce near Church 1970s track installation, view west up Duboce. Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org.

Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org Show More Show Less

13 of 104 You remember the "mummy wrap" tapestry being draped over the Transamerica Pyramid Building. Nothing was safe from being macrame'd in the 1970's. April 29, 1974. Dave Randolph/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

14 of 104 You rode the Parkmobile through Golden Gate Park. Photo taken June 30, 1972. Greg Peterson/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

16 of 104 You brought your sled to the Snow-Ball. San Francisco Ice Company spread 17 tons of snow for the annual "Snow-Ball." Pictured is then Mayor Diane Feinstein giving a sledder a start. December 28, 1978. Clem Albers/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

17 of 104 You paid 25 cents to ride Muni. It cost 25 cents to ride the train throughout most of the 1970's. Photo of San Francisco Muni buses on Castro and 17th Streets, September 30, 1979. Clem Albers/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

19 of 104 You remember the White Night Riots. In this photo, San Francisco Police try to restore order at City Hall during the protests and riots that took place after the Dan White Verdict May 21 1979 John Storey / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

20 of 104 You remember the day Charles Mason was convicted. His followers committed a series of nine murders at four locations in 1969. Manson was convicted in 1971 of first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder for the deaths of seven people, all of which were carried out at his instruction by members of the group. He was also convicted of first-degree murder for two other killings. Uncredited/Associated Press Show More Show Less

22 of 104 You went to the Musee Mechanique when it was on the lower level of the Cliff House. The collection of more than 150 antique mechanical amusements has since moved to a location at Fisherman's Wharf. JERRY TELFER Show More Show Less

23 of 104 You listened to "The Emperor" Gene Nelson on KYA. He ruled the radio waves in the 60s and 70s. In this photo, he's receiving the Bay Area Radio Hall of Fame award and pictured with DJ Celeste Perry Courtesy Ben Fong-Torres Show More Show Less

25 of 104 You remember listened to Lon Simmons (left) broadcast Giant's games on KSFO. Simmons is pictured with Joe Angel in the San Francisco Giants broadcast booth on July 12, 1978. Terry Schmitt/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

26 of 104 You remember when Muni buses looked like this. In this 1975 photo, a New San Francisco Muni bus stands in front of an old Muni bus. Chronicle archives Show More Show Less

28 of 104 You'll never forget the Oakland A's World Series run. The team won three consecutive World Championships between 1972 and 1974, led by memorable players including Catfish Hunter, Reggie Jackson, ace reliever Rollie Fingers, and colorful owner Charlie O. Finley. (Photo: Pitcher Ken Holtzman, of the Oakland As, hurls a pitch towards a Mets batter in fifth inning, of the first game of the World Series, Saturday, Oct. 13, 1973, Oakland, Calif.) Anonymous/ASSOCIATED PRESS Show More Show Less

29 of 104 You were a huge fan of the local band Journey—and their big hair. You saw them play at Golden Gate Park and maybe you were even lucky enough to go to high school with Neal Schon (pictured far left). Courtesy Colombia Records Show More Show Less

31 of 104 You saw Willie Mays hit a homer at Candlestick Park. Mays played for the Giants until 1972, and famously got career hit No. 3000 in the second inning of the Giants' game against the Montreal Expos on July 18, 1970. Focus On Sport/Focus on Sport/Getty Images Show More Show Less

32 of 104 You remember the opening of BART and feared traveling through an underwater tube. The Bay Area transportation system officially opened on Sept. 11, 1972, initially between the MacArther and Fremont stations. The Transbay Tube opened in 1974. Train failures were common in BART's early days. In this photo, patrons enter the Oakland City Center BART station on the opening day. Charles B. Peterson/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You wore groovy clothes. Polyester was the material of choice and bright colors dominated. In this 1971 photo, a man wears matching pants and sweater. In the background, you can see the U.S. Mint and Hotel Pickwick. A commenter identified the vintage cars as (from left): a 1968-72 Opel Kadett (B) wagon, 1962 Mercury Comet, 1971 Plymouth Fury and behind the Fury, a '68-69 Buick Skylark.

35 of 104 You saw Dianne Feinstein pose in a Sutro Baths bathing suit at the opening of Pier 39. Feinstein was the President of the Board of Supervisors at the time, and wore the suit at the opening after losing a bet that the tourism center would open on time. The park opened on October 4, 1978. Jerry Telfer/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember trips across the Bay Bridge with no traffic. You also remember the old eastern span. This photo was taken on the western span in 1971.

38 of 104 You were a fan of the Dead Kennedys. This punk rock band formed in San Francisco in 1978 and became known for its politically charged songs. They frequently played at the North Beach nightclub Mabuhay Gardens. Their name was controversial. San Francisco Chronicle columnist Herb Caen wrote in November 1978, "Just when you think tastelessness has reached its nadir, along comes a punk rock group called 'The Dead Kennedys', which will play at Mabuhay Gardens on Nov. 22, the 15th anniversary of John F. Kennedy's assassination." (Pictured: Jello Biafra of the Dead Kennedys) John O'Hara/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

40 of 104 You remember Candlestick Park with AstroTurf. The natural bluegrass was torn up and the AstroTurf rolled out in 1970. The real grass returned again following the 1978 football season. This photo shows a stolen Piece of AstroTurf at Candlestick Park on Dec. 12, 1978. Show More Show Less

41 of 104 You were an activist. You marched in protests and mourned the loss of trailblazing leader and Supervisor Harvey Milk, who was the first openly gay man elected to public office in America. This photo is from December 1978 on the the wall of the Bank of America at Castro and Market. (Photo: (c) Jerry Pritikin) Jerry Pritikin Show More Show Less

You rode the cable car with friends—and didn't take selfies. Riding the cable car was was pretty much the same experience for tourists of 1971 as it is today—although fares cost less, lines were shorter and nobody was taking dozens of photos.

44 of 104 You'll never forget the day it snowed: Feb. 5, 1976. It was a rare San Francisco snow day, and the white stuff actually stuck to the ground. Clem Albers/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember Grimes Poznikoff, aka "The Human Jukebox." He was a fixture on Fisherman's Wharf in the 1970s and 80s, and waited in a cardboard refrigerator box until someone gave him a donation and requested a song. Then he'd pop out of the front flap and play the song on a trumpet, kazoo or other random instrument. Here he's pictured circa 1978.

You never saw Carol Doda perform live—but you knew who she was. America's first public topless dancer was a huge draw in North Beach in the '60s and '70s.

49 of 104 You always went to Monkey Island first on visits to the San Francisco Zoo. It was damaged in the 1989 earthquake and razed and paved over. Express-News archives Show More Show Less

You feared the "Zodiac" killer. The Zodiac killer is blamed for at least five murders in 1968 and 1969 in the San Francisco Bay Area. Though other serial killers have had more victims, the "Zodiac" intrigued and terrified the public with his mysterious ways. He sent suspected letters to the Vallejo Times Herald, San Francisco Chronicle and other newspapers as late as 1974, warning he'd strike again. He was never caught, though many, including author Robert Graysmith, believe he was Arthur Leigh Allen, a Vallejo man who who died in 1992.

You stopped to listen to the many musicians and buskers on city streets. Back then you actually stopped to listen because you weren't wearing headphones and listing to your playlist on your phone as you walked by. This street musician strums and sings for tips at Pier 45 on Fisherman's Wharf in 1971. Behind him is the now-demolished Tait's at the Wharf.

53 of 104 You learned to drive in the parking lot of the White Front discount variety store. This store's massive parking lot was the perfect place for teenagers to learn to drive. "All my friends learned to drive there," wrote one S.F. local in the Facebook group San Francisco Remembered. White Front was a cross between a Kohl's and a dollar store and the one in S.F. was located at 16th and Bryant streets, the current location of the SoMa Safeway. (Note: This photo is pre-70s and was taken on Dec. 17, 1968) Art Frisch/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

55 of 104 You stayed up late to watch Bob Wilkins on "Creature Features." The cigar-wielding host introduced underground flicks with titles like "Attack of the Mushroom People" on the late-night movie show airing on KTVU's Channel 2 through the 1970s. In this photo, Wilkins sits with co-host John Stanley. KQED Show More Show Less

56 of 104 Buy Photo You feasted on Blum's Coffee Crunch Cake. This heavenly dessert was invented by Ernest Weil, the operations manager of the late bakery soda fountain chain, Blum's, with a location in the basement of the downtown Macy's. (Note: The photo features a modern-day re-creation of the cake.) Liz Hafalia/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

58 of 104 You ate hot dogs at a Doggie Diner. At one point there were more than two dozen in the Bay Area. The last one closed in 1986. Its founder Al Ross died in 2010, at age 93. RIP Doggie Diner. (Susan Ehmer / The Chronicle 1978) Show More Show Less

59 of 104 You mourned the closing of Playland-at-the-Beach in 1972. In this photo, Bill Smit, 74, rides a Playland-at-the-Beach carousel horse one more time on the day before the ride went up for auction. Clem Albers / Clem Albers / The Chronicle 1972 Show More Show Less

61 of 104 You appreciated Dr. Don Rose's corny one-liners on KFRC "The Big 610." Dr. Rose's top-40 show was No. 1 rated virtually from its 1973 start until the station changed to a big band format in 1986. ho Show More Show Less

You shopped for jewelry from the stalls lining Fisherman's Wharf. This was an era of craftspeople and many sold their goods around the city. Photo taken circa 1978.

64 of 104 Your swim team coach was Charlie Sava. He coached Olympic Swimmer Ann Curtis and hundreds of other S.F. kids. Photo taken on Aug. 13, 1987 of Ann Curtis, Charlie Sava and Wendy Nelder at the dedication of the Charlie Sava Pool in the Sunset District. Sava died on his way to work at the pool in 1987. (Pete Breinig / The Chronicle) Show More Show Less

65 of 104 You listened to KYA Radio. And you remember the Matthew's TV and Stereo commercials: "Top of the hill, Daly City!" KYA Show More Show Less

67 of 104 You saw a Day on the Green concert at the Oakland Coliseum. Presented by promotor Bill Graham, the lineup in the 70s was extraordinary: Led Zeppelin, Grateful Dead, The Beach Boys, Eagles, Fleetwood Mac and The Who (pictured). Michael Zagaris/Reel Art Press Show More Show Less

68 of 104 You ate many hard-roll sandwiches from Panelli Brothers Deli. The brothers closed their North Beach establishment in 2002 after 82 years in business. Show More Show Less

70 of 104 You bought your vinyl at Tower Records. You also lined up at the music store for concert tickets. Pictured: Tower Records at Bay Street and Columbus Avenue in San Francisco: Once thriving -- and noisy -- it's now out of business. Chris Hardy/SFC Show More Show Less

71 of 104 You rode the Ferris wheel atop Emporium during the holidays. A holiday tradition at The Emporium was the roof rides which were hoisted onto the roofs of both The Emporium downtown and Stonestown stores each year. Photographer unknown Show More Show Less

You remember the Embarcadero Freeway. The double-decker stretch of highway was demolished after the Loma Prieta Earthquake in 1989.

74 of 104 You chowed down on French fries at Kerry's Lounge and Restaurant. It was located on Army Street near Van Ness and stayed open 24 hours. Chris Stewart/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

76 of 104 You watched Robert Shields perform with his mime, Lorene Yarnell. Here he is pictured at Ghirardelli Square, January 13, 1975 Stephanie Maze/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You rode an electric green-and-white bus to school. Here's the 9-Richland Line Electric Bus #859 pictured at Murray and Crescent on August 1976. Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org.

Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org Show More Show Less

79 of 104 You remember when a scene from "The Streets of San Francisco" was shot on your block. The crime drama starring Karl Malden, right, and Michael Douglas as detectives ran for five seasons between 1972 and 1977. Unlike today's shows that are mostly shot in Hollywood sets, this show was almost entirely shot on location in San Francisco. Courtesy ABC TV/1975/AP Show More Show Less

You saw the Grateful Dead play at Winterland. Here Drummers Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart perform on New Year's Eve 1977 with The Dead at Winterland. Lighting up behind the drummers are Phil Lesh, Bill Graham, Ken Kesey and roadie Steve Parrish.

82 of 104 You saw "Star Wars" at the Coronet. The theater at the corner of Geary Boulevard and Arguello Avenue was torn down to build senior housing. In this photo taken on May 28, 1977, movie-goers are getting out of the the 1 p.m. show show of "Star Wars" on opening day. The film went on to make more than $2 million in six months at the theater. Show More Show Less

You traveled to Berkeley to buy your tie-dye on Telegraph Avenue. The trend stared in the 1960s and carried over into the 70s. This photo was taken in 1971 by photographer Nick DeWolf who traveled from Boston to the Bay Area to take photographs of the 1970s Bay Area.

85 of 104 You remember the smell of pot during the Laserium shows at the Morrison Planetarium at the California Academy of Sciences. The psychedelic rock planetarium show ran from 1974 to 2000. Pink Floyd, The Beatles and The Doors were favorite shows. Chronicle archives Show More Show Less

86 of 104 Listening to jazz on the bandstand at Earthquake McGoon's. Turk Murphy's Jazz Band, pictured, were favorites at this venue. Barney Peterson/Chronicle File Show More Show Less

88 of 104 You ate late-night at Zim's Hamburgers. This location pictured at 19th and Taraval was "closed for renovation" in August 1978, but in reality there was a strike. Jerry Telfer/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

89 of 104 You celebrated a birthday at the Hippo on Van Ness. Remember the Hippo burger, the thick shakes and sweet birthday cakes? Susan Gilbert/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

91 of 104 You stared up in awe at the living Christmas tree under the dome in the City of Paris Department store. In this photo, mannequins on the second floor get a good view of the tree that rises to the top of the rotunda in San Francisco's City of Paris Department Store, Nov. 20, 1972. Joe Rosenthal/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

92 of 104 You remember the opening of St. Mary's Cathedral. Here the church on Cathedral Hill is pictured during construction on Aug. 26, 1969. The cathedral replaced one of the same name that was built in 1891 and burned in 1962. Stan Creighton/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

94 of 104 You rented roller skates in Golden Gate Park. In this December 1977 photo, a roller skate rental truck rents skates at the corner of Fulton Street and Eighth Avenue near Golden Gate Park. John Storey/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

95 of 104 You devoured a burger at Bill's Place. This Richmond spot on Clement Street is still going. All of its burgers are named after S.F. celebrities and the meat is ground fresh daily. (File photo) Show More Show Less

97 of 104 You remember the old California Academy of Sciences. The building was damaged in the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and was relocated downtown to a temporary location before reopening after a complete overhaul in 2008. Peter Breinig/The Chronicle, 1984 Show More Show Less

You remember the buildings that burned on Alcatraz during the Indian occupation. The small island, formerly the location of a prison, was occupied by Native American activists between 1969 and 1971. This photo of the Alcatraz warden's house and lighthouse was taken a year after the mansion burned during the Indian occupation. The entire island was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.

You remember when O.J. Simpson played for the 49ers. Simpson played for the 49ers from 1978-79. He's now better known for his trial and acquittal for the murders of his former wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman.

Focus On Sport/Getty Images Show More Show Less

101 of 104 You jumped into the mosh pit at Mabuhay Gardens. This North Beach punk rock nightclub booked two bands a night seven days a week in its late-70s heyday. Frequent gigs were played by local bands the Avengers, Dead Kennedys, The Nuns, Crime, Dils, Pearl Harbor and the Explosions, the Tubes and Wall of Voodoo. The club's operator Dirksen also booked everyone from Iggy Pop and The Ramones to the Go Go's. Richard McCaffrey/Getty Images Show More Show Less

103 of 104 Tower Records at Columbus and Bay in San Francisco is seen in a file photo. Chris Hardy/SFC Show More Show Less

The 1970s in San Francisco were flamboyant, alive, full of color and passion, marked by dark periods and electric highs.

To grow up in San Francisco in this prismatic era was extraordinary, and anyone who spent their early years here in the 1970s has vivid memories swirling around in the mind.

In the gallery above, we try to capture some, and we thank the Facebook page San Francisco Remembered and its active and knowledgeable community who helped create this list.

The Summer of Love was over, but the free-loving hippie spirit prevailed, and bohemians, buskers, bongo-drum players and jewelry makers thronged the city.


50 things people who grew up in 1970s San Francisco will remember

You chowed down on French fries at Kerry's Lounge and Restaurant: The restaurant was on Army Street (now Cesar Chavez) near Van Ness.

Chris Stewart / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

2 of 104 You saw KISS at the Cow Palace—the night Elvis died. This tough-looking group is in the building for a 1977 KISS concert - notable because the band was at the peak of their popularity, and it was the night Elvis died. KISS acknowledged the event, playing a special edition of "Jailhouse Rock." Chronicle photographer Stephanie Maze wisely photographed the crowd even more than the band, capturing youth in the 1970s perfectly. Stephanie Maze/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

4 of 104 You saw the Blue Angels at Moffett Field. In this photo the Blue Angels bunched up for a final pass over Highway 101, as they landed at Moffett Field after a practice run around the San Francisco bay area in the 1970s. CHP shut the freeway down for the Angels practice. (Photo by Gary Fong) Gary Fong/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

5 of 104 You remember the hippies hanging out in Golden Gate Park. And you longed to join them. Photo taken on August 17, 1978. Barney Peterson/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

7 of 104 You celebrated St. Patrick's Day at the Snake Races. In this photo, snake chaser, Steven Holt of Pacifica cheers on his snake "Sir Hiss" for the title "Fastest snake in the West" during the 20th annual St. Patrick's Day snake race in San Francisco. Undated AP photo, ca. 1970's. Show More Show Less

8 of 104 You went for live jazz at Keystone Korner. Jazz musician Sam Rivers performs at the North Beach club in 1977 Tom Copi/Getty Images Show More Show Less

10 of 104 You pet Charlie O at an Oakland A's game. The mule was the team mascot, named after the team's owner Charlie O. Finley at the time. In this photo, Charlie O gets a hat during Bald-Headed Day at the Oakland Coliseum. The mule died in 1976. Tom Levy / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember when the Muni tracks were installed near Duboce Triangle. Duboce near Church 1970s track installation, view west up Duboce. Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org.

Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org Show More Show Less

13 of 104 You remember the "mummy wrap" tapestry being draped over the Transamerica Pyramid Building. Nothing was safe from being macrame'd in the 1970's. April 29, 1974. Dave Randolph/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

14 of 104 You rode the Parkmobile through Golden Gate Park. Photo taken June 30, 1972. Greg Peterson/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

16 of 104 You brought your sled to the Snow-Ball. San Francisco Ice Company spread 17 tons of snow for the annual "Snow-Ball." Pictured is then Mayor Diane Feinstein giving a sledder a start. December 28, 1978. Clem Albers/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

17 of 104 You paid 25 cents to ride Muni. It cost 25 cents to ride the train throughout most of the 1970's. Photo of San Francisco Muni buses on Castro and 17th Streets, September 30, 1979. Clem Albers/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

19 of 104 You remember the White Night Riots. In this photo, San Francisco Police try to restore order at City Hall during the protests and riots that took place after the Dan White Verdict May 21 1979 John Storey / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

20 of 104 You remember the day Charles Mason was convicted. His followers committed a series of nine murders at four locations in 1969. Manson was convicted in 1971 of first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder for the deaths of seven people, all of which were carried out at his instruction by members of the group. He was also convicted of first-degree murder for two other killings. Uncredited/Associated Press Show More Show Less

22 of 104 You went to the Musee Mechanique when it was on the lower level of the Cliff House. The collection of more than 150 antique mechanical amusements has since moved to a location at Fisherman's Wharf. JERRY TELFER Show More Show Less

23 of 104 You listened to "The Emperor" Gene Nelson on KYA. He ruled the radio waves in the 60s and 70s. In this photo, he's receiving the Bay Area Radio Hall of Fame award and pictured with DJ Celeste Perry Courtesy Ben Fong-Torres Show More Show Less

25 of 104 You remember listened to Lon Simmons (left) broadcast Giant's games on KSFO. Simmons is pictured with Joe Angel in the San Francisco Giants broadcast booth on July 12, 1978. Terry Schmitt/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

26 of 104 You remember when Muni buses looked like this. In this 1975 photo, a New San Francisco Muni bus stands in front of an old Muni bus. Chronicle archives Show More Show Less

28 of 104 You'll never forget the Oakland A's World Series run. The team won three consecutive World Championships between 1972 and 1974, led by memorable players including Catfish Hunter, Reggie Jackson, ace reliever Rollie Fingers, and colorful owner Charlie O. Finley. (Photo: Pitcher Ken Holtzman, of the Oakland As, hurls a pitch towards a Mets batter in fifth inning, of the first game of the World Series, Saturday, Oct. 13, 1973, Oakland, Calif.) Anonymous/ASSOCIATED PRESS Show More Show Less

29 of 104 You were a huge fan of the local band Journey—and their big hair. You saw them play at Golden Gate Park and maybe you were even lucky enough to go to high school with Neal Schon (pictured far left). Courtesy Colombia Records Show More Show Less

31 of 104 You saw Willie Mays hit a homer at Candlestick Park. Mays played for the Giants until 1972, and famously got career hit No. 3000 in the second inning of the Giants' game against the Montreal Expos on July 18, 1970. Focus On Sport/Focus on Sport/Getty Images Show More Show Less

32 of 104 You remember the opening of BART and feared traveling through an underwater tube. The Bay Area transportation system officially opened on Sept. 11, 1972, initially between the MacArther and Fremont stations. The Transbay Tube opened in 1974. Train failures were common in BART's early days. In this photo, patrons enter the Oakland City Center BART station on the opening day. Charles B. Peterson/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You wore groovy clothes. Polyester was the material of choice and bright colors dominated. In this 1971 photo, a man wears matching pants and sweater. In the background, you can see the U.S. Mint and Hotel Pickwick. A commenter identified the vintage cars as (from left): a 1968-72 Opel Kadett (B) wagon, 1962 Mercury Comet, 1971 Plymouth Fury and behind the Fury, a '68-69 Buick Skylark.

35 of 104 You saw Dianne Feinstein pose in a Sutro Baths bathing suit at the opening of Pier 39. Feinstein was the President of the Board of Supervisors at the time, and wore the suit at the opening after losing a bet that the tourism center would open on time. The park opened on October 4, 1978. Jerry Telfer/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember trips across the Bay Bridge with no traffic. You also remember the old eastern span. This photo was taken on the western span in 1971.

38 of 104 You were a fan of the Dead Kennedys. This punk rock band formed in San Francisco in 1978 and became known for its politically charged songs. They frequently played at the North Beach nightclub Mabuhay Gardens. Their name was controversial. San Francisco Chronicle columnist Herb Caen wrote in November 1978, "Just when you think tastelessness has reached its nadir, along comes a punk rock group called 'The Dead Kennedys', which will play at Mabuhay Gardens on Nov. 22, the 15th anniversary of John F. Kennedy's assassination." (Pictured: Jello Biafra of the Dead Kennedys) John O'Hara/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

40 of 104 You remember Candlestick Park with AstroTurf. The natural bluegrass was torn up and the AstroTurf rolled out in 1970. The real grass returned again following the 1978 football season. This photo shows a stolen Piece of AstroTurf at Candlestick Park on Dec. 12, 1978. Show More Show Less

41 of 104 You were an activist. You marched in protests and mourned the loss of trailblazing leader and Supervisor Harvey Milk, who was the first openly gay man elected to public office in America. This photo is from December 1978 on the the wall of the Bank of America at Castro and Market. (Photo: (c) Jerry Pritikin) Jerry Pritikin Show More Show Less

You rode the cable car with friends—and didn't take selfies. Riding the cable car was was pretty much the same experience for tourists of 1971 as it is today—although fares cost less, lines were shorter and nobody was taking dozens of photos.

44 of 104 You'll never forget the day it snowed: Feb. 5, 1976. It was a rare San Francisco snow day, and the white stuff actually stuck to the ground. Clem Albers/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember Grimes Poznikoff, aka "The Human Jukebox." He was a fixture on Fisherman's Wharf in the 1970s and 80s, and waited in a cardboard refrigerator box until someone gave him a donation and requested a song. Then he'd pop out of the front flap and play the song on a trumpet, kazoo or other random instrument. Here he's pictured circa 1978.

You never saw Carol Doda perform live—but you knew who she was. America's first public topless dancer was a huge draw in North Beach in the '60s and '70s.

49 of 104 You always went to Monkey Island first on visits to the San Francisco Zoo. It was damaged in the 1989 earthquake and razed and paved over. Express-News archives Show More Show Less

You feared the "Zodiac" killer. The Zodiac killer is blamed for at least five murders in 1968 and 1969 in the San Francisco Bay Area. Though other serial killers have had more victims, the "Zodiac" intrigued and terrified the public with his mysterious ways. He sent suspected letters to the Vallejo Times Herald, San Francisco Chronicle and other newspapers as late as 1974, warning he'd strike again. He was never caught, though many, including author Robert Graysmith, believe he was Arthur Leigh Allen, a Vallejo man who who died in 1992.

You stopped to listen to the many musicians and buskers on city streets. Back then you actually stopped to listen because you weren't wearing headphones and listing to your playlist on your phone as you walked by. This street musician strums and sings for tips at Pier 45 on Fisherman's Wharf in 1971. Behind him is the now-demolished Tait's at the Wharf.

53 of 104 You learned to drive in the parking lot of the White Front discount variety store. This store's massive parking lot was the perfect place for teenagers to learn to drive. "All my friends learned to drive there," wrote one S.F. local in the Facebook group San Francisco Remembered. White Front was a cross between a Kohl's and a dollar store and the one in S.F. was located at 16th and Bryant streets, the current location of the SoMa Safeway. (Note: This photo is pre-70s and was taken on Dec. 17, 1968) Art Frisch/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

55 of 104 You stayed up late to watch Bob Wilkins on "Creature Features." The cigar-wielding host introduced underground flicks with titles like "Attack of the Mushroom People" on the late-night movie show airing on KTVU's Channel 2 through the 1970s. In this photo, Wilkins sits with co-host John Stanley. KQED Show More Show Less

56 of 104 Buy Photo You feasted on Blum's Coffee Crunch Cake. This heavenly dessert was invented by Ernest Weil, the operations manager of the late bakery soda fountain chain, Blum's, with a location in the basement of the downtown Macy's. (Note: The photo features a modern-day re-creation of the cake.) Liz Hafalia/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

58 of 104 You ate hot dogs at a Doggie Diner. At one point there were more than two dozen in the Bay Area. The last one closed in 1986. Its founder Al Ross died in 2010, at age 93. RIP Doggie Diner. (Susan Ehmer / The Chronicle 1978) Show More Show Less

59 of 104 You mourned the closing of Playland-at-the-Beach in 1972. In this photo, Bill Smit, 74, rides a Playland-at-the-Beach carousel horse one more time on the day before the ride went up for auction. Clem Albers / Clem Albers / The Chronicle 1972 Show More Show Less

61 of 104 You appreciated Dr. Don Rose's corny one-liners on KFRC "The Big 610." Dr. Rose's top-40 show was No. 1 rated virtually from its 1973 start until the station changed to a big band format in 1986. ho Show More Show Less

You shopped for jewelry from the stalls lining Fisherman's Wharf. This was an era of craftspeople and many sold their goods around the city. Photo taken circa 1978.

64 of 104 Your swim team coach was Charlie Sava. He coached Olympic Swimmer Ann Curtis and hundreds of other S.F. kids. Photo taken on Aug. 13, 1987 of Ann Curtis, Charlie Sava and Wendy Nelder at the dedication of the Charlie Sava Pool in the Sunset District. Sava died on his way to work at the pool in 1987. (Pete Breinig / The Chronicle) Show More Show Less

65 of 104 You listened to KYA Radio. And you remember the Matthew's TV and Stereo commercials: "Top of the hill, Daly City!" KYA Show More Show Less

67 of 104 You saw a Day on the Green concert at the Oakland Coliseum. Presented by promotor Bill Graham, the lineup in the 70s was extraordinary: Led Zeppelin, Grateful Dead, The Beach Boys, Eagles, Fleetwood Mac and The Who (pictured). Michael Zagaris/Reel Art Press Show More Show Less

68 of 104 You ate many hard-roll sandwiches from Panelli Brothers Deli. The brothers closed their North Beach establishment in 2002 after 82 years in business. Show More Show Less

70 of 104 You bought your vinyl at Tower Records. You also lined up at the music store for concert tickets. Pictured: Tower Records at Bay Street and Columbus Avenue in San Francisco: Once thriving -- and noisy -- it's now out of business. Chris Hardy/SFC Show More Show Less

71 of 104 You rode the Ferris wheel atop Emporium during the holidays. A holiday tradition at The Emporium was the roof rides which were hoisted onto the roofs of both The Emporium downtown and Stonestown stores each year. Photographer unknown Show More Show Less

You remember the Embarcadero Freeway. The double-decker stretch of highway was demolished after the Loma Prieta Earthquake in 1989.

74 of 104 You chowed down on French fries at Kerry's Lounge and Restaurant. It was located on Army Street near Van Ness and stayed open 24 hours. Chris Stewart/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

76 of 104 You watched Robert Shields perform with his mime, Lorene Yarnell. Here he is pictured at Ghirardelli Square, January 13, 1975 Stephanie Maze/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You rode an electric green-and-white bus to school. Here's the 9-Richland Line Electric Bus #859 pictured at Murray and Crescent on August 1976. Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org.

Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org Show More Show Less

79 of 104 You remember when a scene from "The Streets of San Francisco" was shot on your block. The crime drama starring Karl Malden, right, and Michael Douglas as detectives ran for five seasons between 1972 and 1977. Unlike today's shows that are mostly shot in Hollywood sets, this show was almost entirely shot on location in San Francisco. Courtesy ABC TV/1975/AP Show More Show Less

You saw the Grateful Dead play at Winterland. Here Drummers Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart perform on New Year's Eve 1977 with The Dead at Winterland. Lighting up behind the drummers are Phil Lesh, Bill Graham, Ken Kesey and roadie Steve Parrish.

82 of 104 You saw "Star Wars" at the Coronet. The theater at the corner of Geary Boulevard and Arguello Avenue was torn down to build senior housing. In this photo taken on May 28, 1977, movie-goers are getting out of the the 1 p.m. show show of "Star Wars" on opening day. The film went on to make more than $2 million in six months at the theater. Show More Show Less

You traveled to Berkeley to buy your tie-dye on Telegraph Avenue. The trend stared in the 1960s and carried over into the 70s. This photo was taken in 1971 by photographer Nick DeWolf who traveled from Boston to the Bay Area to take photographs of the 1970s Bay Area.

85 of 104 You remember the smell of pot during the Laserium shows at the Morrison Planetarium at the California Academy of Sciences. The psychedelic rock planetarium show ran from 1974 to 2000. Pink Floyd, The Beatles and The Doors were favorite shows. Chronicle archives Show More Show Less

86 of 104 Listening to jazz on the bandstand at Earthquake McGoon's. Turk Murphy's Jazz Band, pictured, were favorites at this venue. Barney Peterson/Chronicle File Show More Show Less

88 of 104 You ate late-night at Zim's Hamburgers. This location pictured at 19th and Taraval was "closed for renovation" in August 1978, but in reality there was a strike. Jerry Telfer/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

89 of 104 You celebrated a birthday at the Hippo on Van Ness. Remember the Hippo burger, the thick shakes and sweet birthday cakes? Susan Gilbert/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

91 of 104 You stared up in awe at the living Christmas tree under the dome in the City of Paris Department store. In this photo, mannequins on the second floor get a good view of the tree that rises to the top of the rotunda in San Francisco's City of Paris Department Store, Nov. 20, 1972. Joe Rosenthal/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

92 of 104 You remember the opening of St. Mary's Cathedral. Here the church on Cathedral Hill is pictured during construction on Aug. 26, 1969. The cathedral replaced one of the same name that was built in 1891 and burned in 1962. Stan Creighton/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

94 of 104 You rented roller skates in Golden Gate Park. In this December 1977 photo, a roller skate rental truck rents skates at the corner of Fulton Street and Eighth Avenue near Golden Gate Park. John Storey/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

95 of 104 You devoured a burger at Bill's Place. This Richmond spot on Clement Street is still going. All of its burgers are named after S.F. celebrities and the meat is ground fresh daily. (File photo) Show More Show Less

97 of 104 You remember the old California Academy of Sciences. The building was damaged in the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and was relocated downtown to a temporary location before reopening after a complete overhaul in 2008. Peter Breinig/The Chronicle, 1984 Show More Show Less

You remember the buildings that burned on Alcatraz during the Indian occupation. The small island, formerly the location of a prison, was occupied by Native American activists between 1969 and 1971. This photo of the Alcatraz warden's house and lighthouse was taken a year after the mansion burned during the Indian occupation. The entire island was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.

You remember when O.J. Simpson played for the 49ers. Simpson played for the 49ers from 1978-79. He's now better known for his trial and acquittal for the murders of his former wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman.

Focus On Sport/Getty Images Show More Show Less

101 of 104 You jumped into the mosh pit at Mabuhay Gardens. This North Beach punk rock nightclub booked two bands a night seven days a week in its late-70s heyday. Frequent gigs were played by local bands the Avengers, Dead Kennedys, The Nuns, Crime, Dils, Pearl Harbor and the Explosions, the Tubes and Wall of Voodoo. The club's operator Dirksen also booked everyone from Iggy Pop and The Ramones to the Go Go's. Richard McCaffrey/Getty Images Show More Show Less

103 of 104 Tower Records at Columbus and Bay in San Francisco is seen in a file photo. Chris Hardy/SFC Show More Show Less

The 1970s in San Francisco were flamboyant, alive, full of color and passion, marked by dark periods and electric highs.

To grow up in San Francisco in this prismatic era was extraordinary, and anyone who spent their early years here in the 1970s has vivid memories swirling around in the mind.

In the gallery above, we try to capture some, and we thank the Facebook page San Francisco Remembered and its active and knowledgeable community who helped create this list.

The Summer of Love was over, but the free-loving hippie spirit prevailed, and bohemians, buskers, bongo-drum players and jewelry makers thronged the city.


50 things people who grew up in 1970s San Francisco will remember

You chowed down on French fries at Kerry's Lounge and Restaurant: The restaurant was on Army Street (now Cesar Chavez) near Van Ness.

Chris Stewart / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

2 of 104 You saw KISS at the Cow Palace—the night Elvis died. This tough-looking group is in the building for a 1977 KISS concert - notable because the band was at the peak of their popularity, and it was the night Elvis died. KISS acknowledged the event, playing a special edition of "Jailhouse Rock." Chronicle photographer Stephanie Maze wisely photographed the crowd even more than the band, capturing youth in the 1970s perfectly. Stephanie Maze/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

4 of 104 You saw the Blue Angels at Moffett Field. In this photo the Blue Angels bunched up for a final pass over Highway 101, as they landed at Moffett Field after a practice run around the San Francisco bay area in the 1970s. CHP shut the freeway down for the Angels practice. (Photo by Gary Fong) Gary Fong/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

5 of 104 You remember the hippies hanging out in Golden Gate Park. And you longed to join them. Photo taken on August 17, 1978. Barney Peterson/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

7 of 104 You celebrated St. Patrick's Day at the Snake Races. In this photo, snake chaser, Steven Holt of Pacifica cheers on his snake "Sir Hiss" for the title "Fastest snake in the West" during the 20th annual St. Patrick's Day snake race in San Francisco. Undated AP photo, ca. 1970's. Show More Show Less

8 of 104 You went for live jazz at Keystone Korner. Jazz musician Sam Rivers performs at the North Beach club in 1977 Tom Copi/Getty Images Show More Show Less

10 of 104 You pet Charlie O at an Oakland A's game. The mule was the team mascot, named after the team's owner Charlie O. Finley at the time. In this photo, Charlie O gets a hat during Bald-Headed Day at the Oakland Coliseum. The mule died in 1976. Tom Levy / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember when the Muni tracks were installed near Duboce Triangle. Duboce near Church 1970s track installation, view west up Duboce. Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org.

Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org Show More Show Less

13 of 104 You remember the "mummy wrap" tapestry being draped over the Transamerica Pyramid Building. Nothing was safe from being macrame'd in the 1970's. April 29, 1974. Dave Randolph/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

14 of 104 You rode the Parkmobile through Golden Gate Park. Photo taken June 30, 1972. Greg Peterson/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

16 of 104 You brought your sled to the Snow-Ball. San Francisco Ice Company spread 17 tons of snow for the annual "Snow-Ball." Pictured is then Mayor Diane Feinstein giving a sledder a start. December 28, 1978. Clem Albers/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

17 of 104 You paid 25 cents to ride Muni. It cost 25 cents to ride the train throughout most of the 1970's. Photo of San Francisco Muni buses on Castro and 17th Streets, September 30, 1979. Clem Albers/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

19 of 104 You remember the White Night Riots. In this photo, San Francisco Police try to restore order at City Hall during the protests and riots that took place after the Dan White Verdict May 21 1979 John Storey / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

20 of 104 You remember the day Charles Mason was convicted. His followers committed a series of nine murders at four locations in 1969. Manson was convicted in 1971 of first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder for the deaths of seven people, all of which were carried out at his instruction by members of the group. He was also convicted of first-degree murder for two other killings. Uncredited/Associated Press Show More Show Less

22 of 104 You went to the Musee Mechanique when it was on the lower level of the Cliff House. The collection of more than 150 antique mechanical amusements has since moved to a location at Fisherman's Wharf. JERRY TELFER Show More Show Less

23 of 104 You listened to "The Emperor" Gene Nelson on KYA. He ruled the radio waves in the 60s and 70s. In this photo, he's receiving the Bay Area Radio Hall of Fame award and pictured with DJ Celeste Perry Courtesy Ben Fong-Torres Show More Show Less

25 of 104 You remember listened to Lon Simmons (left) broadcast Giant's games on KSFO. Simmons is pictured with Joe Angel in the San Francisco Giants broadcast booth on July 12, 1978. Terry Schmitt/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

26 of 104 You remember when Muni buses looked like this. In this 1975 photo, a New San Francisco Muni bus stands in front of an old Muni bus. Chronicle archives Show More Show Less

28 of 104 You'll never forget the Oakland A's World Series run. The team won three consecutive World Championships between 1972 and 1974, led by memorable players including Catfish Hunter, Reggie Jackson, ace reliever Rollie Fingers, and colorful owner Charlie O. Finley. (Photo: Pitcher Ken Holtzman, of the Oakland As, hurls a pitch towards a Mets batter in fifth inning, of the first game of the World Series, Saturday, Oct. 13, 1973, Oakland, Calif.) Anonymous/ASSOCIATED PRESS Show More Show Less

29 of 104 You were a huge fan of the local band Journey—and their big hair. You saw them play at Golden Gate Park and maybe you were even lucky enough to go to high school with Neal Schon (pictured far left). Courtesy Colombia Records Show More Show Less

31 of 104 You saw Willie Mays hit a homer at Candlestick Park. Mays played for the Giants until 1972, and famously got career hit No. 3000 in the second inning of the Giants' game against the Montreal Expos on July 18, 1970. Focus On Sport/Focus on Sport/Getty Images Show More Show Less

32 of 104 You remember the opening of BART and feared traveling through an underwater tube. The Bay Area transportation system officially opened on Sept. 11, 1972, initially between the MacArther and Fremont stations. The Transbay Tube opened in 1974. Train failures were common in BART's early days. In this photo, patrons enter the Oakland City Center BART station on the opening day. Charles B. Peterson/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You wore groovy clothes. Polyester was the material of choice and bright colors dominated. In this 1971 photo, a man wears matching pants and sweater. In the background, you can see the U.S. Mint and Hotel Pickwick. A commenter identified the vintage cars as (from left): a 1968-72 Opel Kadett (B) wagon, 1962 Mercury Comet, 1971 Plymouth Fury and behind the Fury, a '68-69 Buick Skylark.

35 of 104 You saw Dianne Feinstein pose in a Sutro Baths bathing suit at the opening of Pier 39. Feinstein was the President of the Board of Supervisors at the time, and wore the suit at the opening after losing a bet that the tourism center would open on time. The park opened on October 4, 1978. Jerry Telfer/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember trips across the Bay Bridge with no traffic. You also remember the old eastern span. This photo was taken on the western span in 1971.

38 of 104 You were a fan of the Dead Kennedys. This punk rock band formed in San Francisco in 1978 and became known for its politically charged songs. They frequently played at the North Beach nightclub Mabuhay Gardens. Their name was controversial. San Francisco Chronicle columnist Herb Caen wrote in November 1978, "Just when you think tastelessness has reached its nadir, along comes a punk rock group called 'The Dead Kennedys', which will play at Mabuhay Gardens on Nov. 22, the 15th anniversary of John F. Kennedy's assassination." (Pictured: Jello Biafra of the Dead Kennedys) John O'Hara/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

40 of 104 You remember Candlestick Park with AstroTurf. The natural bluegrass was torn up and the AstroTurf rolled out in 1970. The real grass returned again following the 1978 football season. This photo shows a stolen Piece of AstroTurf at Candlestick Park on Dec. 12, 1978. Show More Show Less

41 of 104 You were an activist. You marched in protests and mourned the loss of trailblazing leader and Supervisor Harvey Milk, who was the first openly gay man elected to public office in America. This photo is from December 1978 on the the wall of the Bank of America at Castro and Market. (Photo: (c) Jerry Pritikin) Jerry Pritikin Show More Show Less

You rode the cable car with friends—and didn't take selfies. Riding the cable car was was pretty much the same experience for tourists of 1971 as it is today—although fares cost less, lines were shorter and nobody was taking dozens of photos.

44 of 104 You'll never forget the day it snowed: Feb. 5, 1976. It was a rare San Francisco snow day, and the white stuff actually stuck to the ground. Clem Albers/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You remember Grimes Poznikoff, aka "The Human Jukebox." He was a fixture on Fisherman's Wharf in the 1970s and 80s, and waited in a cardboard refrigerator box until someone gave him a donation and requested a song. Then he'd pop out of the front flap and play the song on a trumpet, kazoo or other random instrument. Here he's pictured circa 1978.

You never saw Carol Doda perform live—but you knew who she was. America's first public topless dancer was a huge draw in North Beach in the '60s and '70s.

49 of 104 You always went to Monkey Island first on visits to the San Francisco Zoo. It was damaged in the 1989 earthquake and razed and paved over. Express-News archives Show More Show Less

You feared the "Zodiac" killer. The Zodiac killer is blamed for at least five murders in 1968 and 1969 in the San Francisco Bay Area. Though other serial killers have had more victims, the "Zodiac" intrigued and terrified the public with his mysterious ways. He sent suspected letters to the Vallejo Times Herald, San Francisco Chronicle and other newspapers as late as 1974, warning he'd strike again. He was never caught, though many, including author Robert Graysmith, believe he was Arthur Leigh Allen, a Vallejo man who who died in 1992.

You stopped to listen to the many musicians and buskers on city streets. Back then you actually stopped to listen because you weren't wearing headphones and listing to your playlist on your phone as you walked by. This street musician strums and sings for tips at Pier 45 on Fisherman's Wharf in 1971. Behind him is the now-demolished Tait's at the Wharf.

53 of 104 You learned to drive in the parking lot of the White Front discount variety store. This store's massive parking lot was the perfect place for teenagers to learn to drive. "All my friends learned to drive there," wrote one S.F. local in the Facebook group San Francisco Remembered. White Front was a cross between a Kohl's and a dollar store and the one in S.F. was located at 16th and Bryant streets, the current location of the SoMa Safeway. (Note: This photo is pre-70s and was taken on Dec. 17, 1968) Art Frisch/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

55 of 104 You stayed up late to watch Bob Wilkins on "Creature Features." The cigar-wielding host introduced underground flicks with titles like "Attack of the Mushroom People" on the late-night movie show airing on KTVU's Channel 2 through the 1970s. In this photo, Wilkins sits with co-host John Stanley. KQED Show More Show Less

56 of 104 Buy Photo You feasted on Blum's Coffee Crunch Cake. This heavenly dessert was invented by Ernest Weil, the operations manager of the late bakery soda fountain chain, Blum's, with a location in the basement of the downtown Macy's. (Note: The photo features a modern-day re-creation of the cake.) Liz Hafalia/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

58 of 104 You ate hot dogs at a Doggie Diner. At one point there were more than two dozen in the Bay Area. The last one closed in 1986. Its founder Al Ross died in 2010, at age 93. RIP Doggie Diner. (Susan Ehmer / The Chronicle 1978) Show More Show Less

59 of 104 You mourned the closing of Playland-at-the-Beach in 1972. In this photo, Bill Smit, 74, rides a Playland-at-the-Beach carousel horse one more time on the day before the ride went up for auction. Clem Albers / Clem Albers / The Chronicle 1972 Show More Show Less

61 of 104 You appreciated Dr. Don Rose's corny one-liners on KFRC "The Big 610." Dr. Rose's top-40 show was No. 1 rated virtually from its 1973 start until the station changed to a big band format in 1986. ho Show More Show Less

You shopped for jewelry from the stalls lining Fisherman's Wharf. This was an era of craftspeople and many sold their goods around the city. Photo taken circa 1978.

64 of 104 Your swim team coach was Charlie Sava. He coached Olympic Swimmer Ann Curtis and hundreds of other S.F. kids. Photo taken on Aug. 13, 1987 of Ann Curtis, Charlie Sava and Wendy Nelder at the dedication of the Charlie Sava Pool in the Sunset District. Sava died on his way to work at the pool in 1987. (Pete Breinig / The Chronicle) Show More Show Less

65 of 104 You listened to KYA Radio. And you remember the Matthew's TV and Stereo commercials: "Top of the hill, Daly City!" KYA Show More Show Less

67 of 104 You saw a Day on the Green concert at the Oakland Coliseum. Presented by promotor Bill Graham, the lineup in the 70s was extraordinary: Led Zeppelin, Grateful Dead, The Beach Boys, Eagles, Fleetwood Mac and The Who (pictured). Michael Zagaris/Reel Art Press Show More Show Less

68 of 104 You ate many hard-roll sandwiches from Panelli Brothers Deli. The brothers closed their North Beach establishment in 2002 after 82 years in business. Show More Show Less

70 of 104 You bought your vinyl at Tower Records. You also lined up at the music store for concert tickets. Pictured: Tower Records at Bay Street and Columbus Avenue in San Francisco: Once thriving -- and noisy -- it's now out of business. Chris Hardy/SFC Show More Show Less

71 of 104 You rode the Ferris wheel atop Emporium during the holidays. A holiday tradition at The Emporium was the roof rides which were hoisted onto the roofs of both The Emporium downtown and Stonestown stores each year. Photographer unknown Show More Show Less

You remember the Embarcadero Freeway. The double-decker stretch of highway was demolished after the Loma Prieta Earthquake in 1989.

74 of 104 You chowed down on French fries at Kerry's Lounge and Restaurant. It was located on Army Street near Van Ness and stayed open 24 hours. Chris Stewart/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

76 of 104 You watched Robert Shields perform with his mime, Lorene Yarnell. Here he is pictured at Ghirardelli Square, January 13, 1975 Stephanie Maze/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

You rode an electric green-and-white bus to school. Here's the 9-Richland Line Electric Bus #859 pictured at Murray and Crescent on August 1976. Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org.

Courtesy of OpenSFHistory.org Show More Show Less

79 of 104 You remember when a scene from "The Streets of San Francisco" was shot on your block. The crime drama starring Karl Malden, right, and Michael Douglas as detectives ran for five seasons between 1972 and 1977. Unlike today's shows that are mostly shot in Hollywood sets, this show was almost entirely shot on location in San Francisco. Courtesy ABC TV/1975/AP Show More Show Less

You saw the Grateful Dead play at Winterland. Here Drummers Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart perform on New Year's Eve 1977 with The Dead at Winterland. Lighting up behind the drummers are Phil Lesh, Bill Graham, Ken Kesey and roadie Steve Parrish.

82 of 104 You saw "Star Wars" at the Coronet. The theater at the corner of Geary Boulevard and Arguello Avenue was torn down to build senior housing. In this photo taken on May 28, 1977, movie-goers are getting out of the the 1 p.m. show show of "Star Wars" on opening day. The film went on to make more than $2 million in six months at the theater. Show More Show Less

You traveled to Berkeley to buy your tie-dye on Telegraph Avenue. The trend stared in the 1960s and carried over into the 70s. This photo was taken in 1971 by photographer Nick DeWolf who traveled from Boston to the Bay Area to take photographs of the 1970s Bay Area.

85 of 104 You remember the smell of pot during the Laserium shows at the Morrison Planetarium at the California Academy of Sciences. The psychedelic rock planetarium show ran from 1974 to 2000. Pink Floyd, The Beatles and The Doors were favorite shows. Chronicle archives Show More Show Less

86 of 104 Listening to jazz on the bandstand at Earthquake McGoon's. Turk Murphy's Jazz Band, pictured, were favorites at this venue. Barney Peterson/Chronicle File Show More Show Less

88 of 104 You ate late-night at Zim's Hamburgers. This location pictured at 19th and Taraval was "closed for renovation" in August 1978, but in reality there was a strike. Jerry Telfer/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

89 of 104 You celebrated a birthday at the Hippo on Van Ness. Remember the Hippo burger, the thick shakes and sweet birthday cakes? Susan Gilbert/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

91 of 104 You stared up in awe at the living Christmas tree under the dome in the City of Paris Department store. In this photo, mannequins on the second floor get a good view of the tree that rises to the top of the rotunda in San Francisco's City of Paris Department Store, Nov. 20, 1972. Joe Rosenthal/San Francisco Chronicle Show More Show Less

92 of 104 You remember the opening of St. Mary's Cathedral. Here the church on Cathedral Hill is pictured during construction on Aug. 26, 1969. The cathedral replaced one of the same name that was built in 1891 and burned in 1962. Stan Creighton/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

94 of 104 You rented roller skates in Golden Gate Park. In this December 1977 photo, a roller skate rental truck rents skates at the corner of Fulton Street and Eighth Avenue near Golden Gate Park. John Storey/The Chronicle Show More Show Less

95 of 104 You devoured a burger at Bill's Place. This Richmond spot on Clement Street is still going. All of its burgers are named after S.F. celebrities and the meat is ground fresh daily. (File photo) Show More Show Less

97 of 104 You remember the old California Academy of Sciences. The building was damaged in the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and was relocated downtown to a temporary location before reopening after a complete overhaul in 2008. Peter Breinig/The Chronicle, 1984 Show More Show Less

You remember the buildings that burned on Alcatraz during the Indian occupation. The small island, formerly the location of a prison, was occupied by Native American activists between 1969 and 1971. This photo of the Alcatraz warden's house and lighthouse was taken a year after the mansion burned during the Indian occupation. The entire island was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.

You remember when O.J. Simpson played for the 49ers. Simpson played for the 49ers from 1978-79. He's now better known for his trial and acquittal for the murders of his former wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman.

Focus On Sport/Getty Images Show More Show Less

101 of 104 You jumped into the mosh pit at Mabuhay Gardens. This North Beach punk rock nightclub booked two bands a night seven days a week in its late-70s heyday. Frequent gigs were played by local bands the Avengers, Dead Kennedys, The Nuns, Crime, Dils, Pearl Harbor and the Explosions, the Tubes and Wall of Voodoo. The club's operator Dirksen also booked everyone from Iggy Pop and The Ramones to the Go Go's. Richard McCaffrey/Getty Images Show More Show Less

103 of 104 Tower Records at Columbus and Bay in San Francisco is seen in a file photo. Chris Hardy/SFC Show More Show Less

The 1970s in San Francisco were flamboyant, alive, full of color and passion, marked by dark periods and electric highs.

To grow up in San Francisco in this prismatic era was extraordinary, and anyone who spent their early years here in the 1970s has vivid memories swirling around in the mind.

In the gallery above, we try to capture some, and we thank the Facebook page San Francisco Remembered and its active and knowledgeable community who helped create this list.

The Summer of Love was over, but the free-loving hippie spirit prevailed, and bohemians, buskers, bongo-drum players and jewelry makers thronged the city.


Watch the video: ΤΟΝ ΦΙΛΟΞΕΝΗΣΕ ΣΠΙΤΙ ΤΟΥ Ο ΜΗΤΣΟΤΑΚΗΣ! Αυτά σχεδίασαν και αυτά θα συμβούν! ΠΡΕΠΕΙ ΝΑ ΤΟ ΜΑΘΕΙΣ! (October 2021).