New recipes

Explorers Club Serves Eyeballs, Maggot Sprinkles


At the 108th Explorers Club Annual Dinner, canapés were topped with mealworms and cocktails were garnished with eyeballs

Dish from Explorers Club Annual Dinner

Here's a dinner party fit for Andrew Zimmern's Bizarre Foods — the 108th Explorers Club Annual Dinner was held last Saturday at the Waldorf Astoria in Manhattan, and the menu was pretty gnarly.

Not only were there pickled eyeballs, but PopSci reports that the dinner included dishes like ostrich coq au vin. Some notable descriptions:

• Whole Roasted Alligator and Gator Chili

• Turtle Cakes with Caper Remoulade

• Python Patties with Nueske's Bacon

• Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches Infused with Tasmanian Leatherwood Honey and Citrus

• Pineapple towers with scorpion, pea pods, strawberry slices, melon balls, and green grapes

• Sautéed and deep-fried earthworms

• Strawberries dipped in white and dark chocolate with housefly larvae and pupae sprinkles (maggots)

And of course, the signature drink of the night was the Explorers Club Martini — "a vodka martini rimmed with bourbon smoked sugar and a skewer of olive, onion, and pickled eyeball topped with a Tasmanian leatherwood honey-soaked mealworm."

All things considered, ignoring the various creepy crawlies, it all sounds kind of good. Plus, eating bugs has been a slow and small trend for a while, and alligator chili sounds just delightful. Hey Explorers Club — send us an invite next time.


  • MailOnline Travel's Sadie Whitelocks reveals the things she's eaten on her travels
  • While visiting a Masai Mara tribe in Tanzania she was given a cow's blood broth
  • At an event in New York the martinis came served with sheep's eyeballs

Published: 10:50 BST, 7 June 2017 | Updated: 21:11 BST, 8 June 2017

Vegetarians and the squeamish, stop reading now.

MailOnline Travel's Sadie Whitelocks has revealed some of the most stomach-churning things she's eaten on her travels.

Sheep's eyeballs, cow's blood broth and strips of bull's penis are among her more memorable snacks. Read on to hear about her indigestion-inducing food encounters, which are likely to deaden rather than rouse your appetite.

Grub's up! Sadie was once tasked with helping the famed Bug Chef, David George Gordon, prepare canapés for an event in New York

I was once tasked with helping the famed Bug Chef, David George Gordon, prepare canapés for an event in New York.

The quirky kitchen hand, who is the author of numerous books including the Eat-a-Bug Cookbook, is known for experimenting with a range of unusual ingredients including crickets, spiders and dragonflies.

My task for the day was dressing dozens of giant mole crickets so they looked a little more edible.

Over the course of about three hours, I wrapped hundreds of large crickets in thick cuts of bacon, with pineapple chunks skewered through the centre.

At the event I got to try one of my creations. The chunky bacon was divine - lovely and smoky - but the cricket was crunchy.

After giving the insect a good chomp, I felt like it burst in my mouth and the innards weren't tasty. It was very leggy and had a musty cardboard-like flavour. I definitely needed to check my teeth after for bits of leg and wing.

Hairy encounter: The Bug Chef also likes to rustle up tarantulas. He singes off all the hairs before dunking them in a light batter and deep frying them

During my day with the Bug Chef I also watched him prepare tarantulas.

It gave me shivers down my spine as hundreds of spiders lay motionless in catering trays.

David freezes the tarantulas first, then removes their abdomens before singeing off all of their hairs with a blow torch.

He says the hairs are irritants, and if you don't prepare the tarantulas properly, you can make people ill.

He finishes them off by dunking them in a light batter and deep-frying them. I had to admit, they weren't too bad and had a nice crispiness but I couldn't help think about what I was eating.

Suddenly the nursery rhyme There Was an Old Lady sprang to mind. 'There was an old lady who swallowed a spider, That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her.'

Thankfully no wriggling or jiggling occurred.

A supper to remember: While visiting a Masai Mara tribe, Sadie was offered goat meat (left) and some cow blood broth mixed with bile (right)

When I'm a guest at someone's house for dinner I eat what I'm given.

But when I visited a Masai Mara tribe in Tanzania I contemplated ditching that rule, as I was handed a cup of cow's blood broth.

The steaming liquid had a slight green colour and someone kindly told me the blood had been mixed with a spot of bile. Splendid.


  • MailOnline Travel's Sadie Whitelocks reveals the things she's eaten on her travels
  • While visiting a Masai Mara tribe in Tanzania she was given a cow's blood broth
  • At an event in New York the martinis came served with sheep's eyeballs

Published: 10:50 BST, 7 June 2017 | Updated: 21:11 BST, 8 June 2017

Vegetarians and the squeamish, stop reading now.

MailOnline Travel's Sadie Whitelocks has revealed some of the most stomach-churning things she's eaten on her travels.

Sheep's eyeballs, cow's blood broth and strips of bull's penis are among her more memorable snacks. Read on to hear about her indigestion-inducing food encounters, which are likely to deaden rather than rouse your appetite.

Grub's up! Sadie was once tasked with helping the famed Bug Chef, David George Gordon, prepare canapés for an event in New York

I was once tasked with helping the famed Bug Chef, David George Gordon, prepare canapés for an event in New York.

The quirky kitchen hand, who is the author of numerous books including the Eat-a-Bug Cookbook, is known for experimenting with a range of unusual ingredients including crickets, spiders and dragonflies.

My task for the day was dressing dozens of giant mole crickets so they looked a little more edible.

Over the course of about three hours, I wrapped hundreds of large crickets in thick cuts of bacon, with pineapple chunks skewered through the centre.

At the event I got to try one of my creations. The chunky bacon was divine - lovely and smoky - but the cricket was crunchy.

After giving the insect a good chomp, I felt like it burst in my mouth and the innards weren't tasty. It was very leggy and had a musty cardboard-like flavour. I definitely needed to check my teeth after for bits of leg and wing.

Hairy encounter: The Bug Chef also likes to rustle up tarantulas. He singes off all the hairs before dunking them in a light batter and deep frying them

During my day with the Bug Chef I also watched him prepare tarantulas.

It gave me shivers down my spine as hundreds of spiders lay motionless in catering trays.

David freezes the tarantulas first, then removes their abdomens before singeing off all of their hairs with a blow torch.

He says the hairs are irritants, and if you don't prepare the tarantulas properly, you can make people ill.

He finishes them off by dunking them in a light batter and deep-frying them. I had to admit, they weren't too bad and had a nice crispiness but I couldn't help think about what I was eating.

Suddenly the nursery rhyme There Was an Old Lady sprang to mind. 'There was an old lady who swallowed a spider, That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her.'

Thankfully no wriggling or jiggling occurred.

A supper to remember: While visiting a Masai Mara tribe, Sadie was offered goat meat (left) and some cow blood broth mixed with bile (right)

When I'm a guest at someone's house for dinner I eat what I'm given.

But when I visited a Masai Mara tribe in Tanzania I contemplated ditching that rule, as I was handed a cup of cow's blood broth.

The steaming liquid had a slight green colour and someone kindly told me the blood had been mixed with a spot of bile. Splendid.


  • MailOnline Travel's Sadie Whitelocks reveals the things she's eaten on her travels
  • While visiting a Masai Mara tribe in Tanzania she was given a cow's blood broth
  • At an event in New York the martinis came served with sheep's eyeballs

Published: 10:50 BST, 7 June 2017 | Updated: 21:11 BST, 8 June 2017

Vegetarians and the squeamish, stop reading now.

MailOnline Travel's Sadie Whitelocks has revealed some of the most stomach-churning things she's eaten on her travels.

Sheep's eyeballs, cow's blood broth and strips of bull's penis are among her more memorable snacks. Read on to hear about her indigestion-inducing food encounters, which are likely to deaden rather than rouse your appetite.

Grub's up! Sadie was once tasked with helping the famed Bug Chef, David George Gordon, prepare canapés for an event in New York

I was once tasked with helping the famed Bug Chef, David George Gordon, prepare canapés for an event in New York.

The quirky kitchen hand, who is the author of numerous books including the Eat-a-Bug Cookbook, is known for experimenting with a range of unusual ingredients including crickets, spiders and dragonflies.

My task for the day was dressing dozens of giant mole crickets so they looked a little more edible.

Over the course of about three hours, I wrapped hundreds of large crickets in thick cuts of bacon, with pineapple chunks skewered through the centre.

At the event I got to try one of my creations. The chunky bacon was divine - lovely and smoky - but the cricket was crunchy.

After giving the insect a good chomp, I felt like it burst in my mouth and the innards weren't tasty. It was very leggy and had a musty cardboard-like flavour. I definitely needed to check my teeth after for bits of leg and wing.

Hairy encounter: The Bug Chef also likes to rustle up tarantulas. He singes off all the hairs before dunking them in a light batter and deep frying them

During my day with the Bug Chef I also watched him prepare tarantulas.

It gave me shivers down my spine as hundreds of spiders lay motionless in catering trays.

David freezes the tarantulas first, then removes their abdomens before singeing off all of their hairs with a blow torch.

He says the hairs are irritants, and if you don't prepare the tarantulas properly, you can make people ill.

He finishes them off by dunking them in a light batter and deep-frying them. I had to admit, they weren't too bad and had a nice crispiness but I couldn't help think about what I was eating.

Suddenly the nursery rhyme There Was an Old Lady sprang to mind. 'There was an old lady who swallowed a spider, That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her.'

Thankfully no wriggling or jiggling occurred.

A supper to remember: While visiting a Masai Mara tribe, Sadie was offered goat meat (left) and some cow blood broth mixed with bile (right)

When I'm a guest at someone's house for dinner I eat what I'm given.

But when I visited a Masai Mara tribe in Tanzania I contemplated ditching that rule, as I was handed a cup of cow's blood broth.

The steaming liquid had a slight green colour and someone kindly told me the blood had been mixed with a spot of bile. Splendid.


  • MailOnline Travel's Sadie Whitelocks reveals the things she's eaten on her travels
  • While visiting a Masai Mara tribe in Tanzania she was given a cow's blood broth
  • At an event in New York the martinis came served with sheep's eyeballs

Published: 10:50 BST, 7 June 2017 | Updated: 21:11 BST, 8 June 2017

Vegetarians and the squeamish, stop reading now.

MailOnline Travel's Sadie Whitelocks has revealed some of the most stomach-churning things she's eaten on her travels.

Sheep's eyeballs, cow's blood broth and strips of bull's penis are among her more memorable snacks. Read on to hear about her indigestion-inducing food encounters, which are likely to deaden rather than rouse your appetite.

Grub's up! Sadie was once tasked with helping the famed Bug Chef, David George Gordon, prepare canapés for an event in New York

I was once tasked with helping the famed Bug Chef, David George Gordon, prepare canapés for an event in New York.

The quirky kitchen hand, who is the author of numerous books including the Eat-a-Bug Cookbook, is known for experimenting with a range of unusual ingredients including crickets, spiders and dragonflies.

My task for the day was dressing dozens of giant mole crickets so they looked a little more edible.

Over the course of about three hours, I wrapped hundreds of large crickets in thick cuts of bacon, with pineapple chunks skewered through the centre.

At the event I got to try one of my creations. The chunky bacon was divine - lovely and smoky - but the cricket was crunchy.

After giving the insect a good chomp, I felt like it burst in my mouth and the innards weren't tasty. It was very leggy and had a musty cardboard-like flavour. I definitely needed to check my teeth after for bits of leg and wing.

Hairy encounter: The Bug Chef also likes to rustle up tarantulas. He singes off all the hairs before dunking them in a light batter and deep frying them

During my day with the Bug Chef I also watched him prepare tarantulas.

It gave me shivers down my spine as hundreds of spiders lay motionless in catering trays.

David freezes the tarantulas first, then removes their abdomens before singeing off all of their hairs with a blow torch.

He says the hairs are irritants, and if you don't prepare the tarantulas properly, you can make people ill.

He finishes them off by dunking them in a light batter and deep-frying them. I had to admit, they weren't too bad and had a nice crispiness but I couldn't help think about what I was eating.

Suddenly the nursery rhyme There Was an Old Lady sprang to mind. 'There was an old lady who swallowed a spider, That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her.'

Thankfully no wriggling or jiggling occurred.

A supper to remember: While visiting a Masai Mara tribe, Sadie was offered goat meat (left) and some cow blood broth mixed with bile (right)

When I'm a guest at someone's house for dinner I eat what I'm given.

But when I visited a Masai Mara tribe in Tanzania I contemplated ditching that rule, as I was handed a cup of cow's blood broth.

The steaming liquid had a slight green colour and someone kindly told me the blood had been mixed with a spot of bile. Splendid.


  • MailOnline Travel's Sadie Whitelocks reveals the things she's eaten on her travels
  • While visiting a Masai Mara tribe in Tanzania she was given a cow's blood broth
  • At an event in New York the martinis came served with sheep's eyeballs

Published: 10:50 BST, 7 June 2017 | Updated: 21:11 BST, 8 June 2017

Vegetarians and the squeamish, stop reading now.

MailOnline Travel's Sadie Whitelocks has revealed some of the most stomach-churning things she's eaten on her travels.

Sheep's eyeballs, cow's blood broth and strips of bull's penis are among her more memorable snacks. Read on to hear about her indigestion-inducing food encounters, which are likely to deaden rather than rouse your appetite.

Grub's up! Sadie was once tasked with helping the famed Bug Chef, David George Gordon, prepare canapés for an event in New York

I was once tasked with helping the famed Bug Chef, David George Gordon, prepare canapés for an event in New York.

The quirky kitchen hand, who is the author of numerous books including the Eat-a-Bug Cookbook, is known for experimenting with a range of unusual ingredients including crickets, spiders and dragonflies.

My task for the day was dressing dozens of giant mole crickets so they looked a little more edible.

Over the course of about three hours, I wrapped hundreds of large crickets in thick cuts of bacon, with pineapple chunks skewered through the centre.

At the event I got to try one of my creations. The chunky bacon was divine - lovely and smoky - but the cricket was crunchy.

After giving the insect a good chomp, I felt like it burst in my mouth and the innards weren't tasty. It was very leggy and had a musty cardboard-like flavour. I definitely needed to check my teeth after for bits of leg and wing.

Hairy encounter: The Bug Chef also likes to rustle up tarantulas. He singes off all the hairs before dunking them in a light batter and deep frying them

During my day with the Bug Chef I also watched him prepare tarantulas.

It gave me shivers down my spine as hundreds of spiders lay motionless in catering trays.

David freezes the tarantulas first, then removes their abdomens before singeing off all of their hairs with a blow torch.

He says the hairs are irritants, and if you don't prepare the tarantulas properly, you can make people ill.

He finishes them off by dunking them in a light batter and deep-frying them. I had to admit, they weren't too bad and had a nice crispiness but I couldn't help think about what I was eating.

Suddenly the nursery rhyme There Was an Old Lady sprang to mind. 'There was an old lady who swallowed a spider, That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her.'

Thankfully no wriggling or jiggling occurred.

A supper to remember: While visiting a Masai Mara tribe, Sadie was offered goat meat (left) and some cow blood broth mixed with bile (right)

When I'm a guest at someone's house for dinner I eat what I'm given.

But when I visited a Masai Mara tribe in Tanzania I contemplated ditching that rule, as I was handed a cup of cow's blood broth.

The steaming liquid had a slight green colour and someone kindly told me the blood had been mixed with a spot of bile. Splendid.


  • MailOnline Travel's Sadie Whitelocks reveals the things she's eaten on her travels
  • While visiting a Masai Mara tribe in Tanzania she was given a cow's blood broth
  • At an event in New York the martinis came served with sheep's eyeballs

Published: 10:50 BST, 7 June 2017 | Updated: 21:11 BST, 8 June 2017

Vegetarians and the squeamish, stop reading now.

MailOnline Travel's Sadie Whitelocks has revealed some of the most stomach-churning things she's eaten on her travels.

Sheep's eyeballs, cow's blood broth and strips of bull's penis are among her more memorable snacks. Read on to hear about her indigestion-inducing food encounters, which are likely to deaden rather than rouse your appetite.

Grub's up! Sadie was once tasked with helping the famed Bug Chef, David George Gordon, prepare canapés for an event in New York

I was once tasked with helping the famed Bug Chef, David George Gordon, prepare canapés for an event in New York.

The quirky kitchen hand, who is the author of numerous books including the Eat-a-Bug Cookbook, is known for experimenting with a range of unusual ingredients including crickets, spiders and dragonflies.

My task for the day was dressing dozens of giant mole crickets so they looked a little more edible.

Over the course of about three hours, I wrapped hundreds of large crickets in thick cuts of bacon, with pineapple chunks skewered through the centre.

At the event I got to try one of my creations. The chunky bacon was divine - lovely and smoky - but the cricket was crunchy.

After giving the insect a good chomp, I felt like it burst in my mouth and the innards weren't tasty. It was very leggy and had a musty cardboard-like flavour. I definitely needed to check my teeth after for bits of leg and wing.

Hairy encounter: The Bug Chef also likes to rustle up tarantulas. He singes off all the hairs before dunking them in a light batter and deep frying them

During my day with the Bug Chef I also watched him prepare tarantulas.

It gave me shivers down my spine as hundreds of spiders lay motionless in catering trays.

David freezes the tarantulas first, then removes their abdomens before singeing off all of their hairs with a blow torch.

He says the hairs are irritants, and if you don't prepare the tarantulas properly, you can make people ill.

He finishes them off by dunking them in a light batter and deep-frying them. I had to admit, they weren't too bad and had a nice crispiness but I couldn't help think about what I was eating.

Suddenly the nursery rhyme There Was an Old Lady sprang to mind. 'There was an old lady who swallowed a spider, That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her.'

Thankfully no wriggling or jiggling occurred.

A supper to remember: While visiting a Masai Mara tribe, Sadie was offered goat meat (left) and some cow blood broth mixed with bile (right)

When I'm a guest at someone's house for dinner I eat what I'm given.

But when I visited a Masai Mara tribe in Tanzania I contemplated ditching that rule, as I was handed a cup of cow's blood broth.

The steaming liquid had a slight green colour and someone kindly told me the blood had been mixed with a spot of bile. Splendid.


  • MailOnline Travel's Sadie Whitelocks reveals the things she's eaten on her travels
  • While visiting a Masai Mara tribe in Tanzania she was given a cow's blood broth
  • At an event in New York the martinis came served with sheep's eyeballs

Published: 10:50 BST, 7 June 2017 | Updated: 21:11 BST, 8 June 2017

Vegetarians and the squeamish, stop reading now.

MailOnline Travel's Sadie Whitelocks has revealed some of the most stomach-churning things she's eaten on her travels.

Sheep's eyeballs, cow's blood broth and strips of bull's penis are among her more memorable snacks. Read on to hear about her indigestion-inducing food encounters, which are likely to deaden rather than rouse your appetite.

Grub's up! Sadie was once tasked with helping the famed Bug Chef, David George Gordon, prepare canapés for an event in New York

I was once tasked with helping the famed Bug Chef, David George Gordon, prepare canapés for an event in New York.

The quirky kitchen hand, who is the author of numerous books including the Eat-a-Bug Cookbook, is known for experimenting with a range of unusual ingredients including crickets, spiders and dragonflies.

My task for the day was dressing dozens of giant mole crickets so they looked a little more edible.

Over the course of about three hours, I wrapped hundreds of large crickets in thick cuts of bacon, with pineapple chunks skewered through the centre.

At the event I got to try one of my creations. The chunky bacon was divine - lovely and smoky - but the cricket was crunchy.

After giving the insect a good chomp, I felt like it burst in my mouth and the innards weren't tasty. It was very leggy and had a musty cardboard-like flavour. I definitely needed to check my teeth after for bits of leg and wing.

Hairy encounter: The Bug Chef also likes to rustle up tarantulas. He singes off all the hairs before dunking them in a light batter and deep frying them

During my day with the Bug Chef I also watched him prepare tarantulas.

It gave me shivers down my spine as hundreds of spiders lay motionless in catering trays.

David freezes the tarantulas first, then removes their abdomens before singeing off all of their hairs with a blow torch.

He says the hairs are irritants, and if you don't prepare the tarantulas properly, you can make people ill.

He finishes them off by dunking them in a light batter and deep-frying them. I had to admit, they weren't too bad and had a nice crispiness but I couldn't help think about what I was eating.

Suddenly the nursery rhyme There Was an Old Lady sprang to mind. 'There was an old lady who swallowed a spider, That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her.'

Thankfully no wriggling or jiggling occurred.

A supper to remember: While visiting a Masai Mara tribe, Sadie was offered goat meat (left) and some cow blood broth mixed with bile (right)

When I'm a guest at someone's house for dinner I eat what I'm given.

But when I visited a Masai Mara tribe in Tanzania I contemplated ditching that rule, as I was handed a cup of cow's blood broth.

The steaming liquid had a slight green colour and someone kindly told me the blood had been mixed with a spot of bile. Splendid.


  • MailOnline Travel's Sadie Whitelocks reveals the things she's eaten on her travels
  • While visiting a Masai Mara tribe in Tanzania she was given a cow's blood broth
  • At an event in New York the martinis came served with sheep's eyeballs

Published: 10:50 BST, 7 June 2017 | Updated: 21:11 BST, 8 June 2017

Vegetarians and the squeamish, stop reading now.

MailOnline Travel's Sadie Whitelocks has revealed some of the most stomach-churning things she's eaten on her travels.

Sheep's eyeballs, cow's blood broth and strips of bull's penis are among her more memorable snacks. Read on to hear about her indigestion-inducing food encounters, which are likely to deaden rather than rouse your appetite.

Grub's up! Sadie was once tasked with helping the famed Bug Chef, David George Gordon, prepare canapés for an event in New York

I was once tasked with helping the famed Bug Chef, David George Gordon, prepare canapés for an event in New York.

The quirky kitchen hand, who is the author of numerous books including the Eat-a-Bug Cookbook, is known for experimenting with a range of unusual ingredients including crickets, spiders and dragonflies.

My task for the day was dressing dozens of giant mole crickets so they looked a little more edible.

Over the course of about three hours, I wrapped hundreds of large crickets in thick cuts of bacon, with pineapple chunks skewered through the centre.

At the event I got to try one of my creations. The chunky bacon was divine - lovely and smoky - but the cricket was crunchy.

After giving the insect a good chomp, I felt like it burst in my mouth and the innards weren't tasty. It was very leggy and had a musty cardboard-like flavour. I definitely needed to check my teeth after for bits of leg and wing.

Hairy encounter: The Bug Chef also likes to rustle up tarantulas. He singes off all the hairs before dunking them in a light batter and deep frying them

During my day with the Bug Chef I also watched him prepare tarantulas.

It gave me shivers down my spine as hundreds of spiders lay motionless in catering trays.

David freezes the tarantulas first, then removes their abdomens before singeing off all of their hairs with a blow torch.

He says the hairs are irritants, and if you don't prepare the tarantulas properly, you can make people ill.

He finishes them off by dunking them in a light batter and deep-frying them. I had to admit, they weren't too bad and had a nice crispiness but I couldn't help think about what I was eating.

Suddenly the nursery rhyme There Was an Old Lady sprang to mind. 'There was an old lady who swallowed a spider, That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her.'

Thankfully no wriggling or jiggling occurred.

A supper to remember: While visiting a Masai Mara tribe, Sadie was offered goat meat (left) and some cow blood broth mixed with bile (right)

When I'm a guest at someone's house for dinner I eat what I'm given.

But when I visited a Masai Mara tribe in Tanzania I contemplated ditching that rule, as I was handed a cup of cow's blood broth.

The steaming liquid had a slight green colour and someone kindly told me the blood had been mixed with a spot of bile. Splendid.


  • MailOnline Travel's Sadie Whitelocks reveals the things she's eaten on her travels
  • While visiting a Masai Mara tribe in Tanzania she was given a cow's blood broth
  • At an event in New York the martinis came served with sheep's eyeballs

Published: 10:50 BST, 7 June 2017 | Updated: 21:11 BST, 8 June 2017

Vegetarians and the squeamish, stop reading now.

MailOnline Travel's Sadie Whitelocks has revealed some of the most stomach-churning things she's eaten on her travels.

Sheep's eyeballs, cow's blood broth and strips of bull's penis are among her more memorable snacks. Read on to hear about her indigestion-inducing food encounters, which are likely to deaden rather than rouse your appetite.

Grub's up! Sadie was once tasked with helping the famed Bug Chef, David George Gordon, prepare canapés for an event in New York

I was once tasked with helping the famed Bug Chef, David George Gordon, prepare canapés for an event in New York.

The quirky kitchen hand, who is the author of numerous books including the Eat-a-Bug Cookbook, is known for experimenting with a range of unusual ingredients including crickets, spiders and dragonflies.

My task for the day was dressing dozens of giant mole crickets so they looked a little more edible.

Over the course of about three hours, I wrapped hundreds of large crickets in thick cuts of bacon, with pineapple chunks skewered through the centre.

At the event I got to try one of my creations. The chunky bacon was divine - lovely and smoky - but the cricket was crunchy.

After giving the insect a good chomp, I felt like it burst in my mouth and the innards weren't tasty. It was very leggy and had a musty cardboard-like flavour. I definitely needed to check my teeth after for bits of leg and wing.

Hairy encounter: The Bug Chef also likes to rustle up tarantulas. He singes off all the hairs before dunking them in a light batter and deep frying them

During my day with the Bug Chef I also watched him prepare tarantulas.

It gave me shivers down my spine as hundreds of spiders lay motionless in catering trays.

David freezes the tarantulas first, then removes their abdomens before singeing off all of their hairs with a blow torch.

He says the hairs are irritants, and if you don't prepare the tarantulas properly, you can make people ill.

He finishes them off by dunking them in a light batter and deep-frying them. I had to admit, they weren't too bad and had a nice crispiness but I couldn't help think about what I was eating.

Suddenly the nursery rhyme There Was an Old Lady sprang to mind. 'There was an old lady who swallowed a spider, That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her.'

Thankfully no wriggling or jiggling occurred.

A supper to remember: While visiting a Masai Mara tribe, Sadie was offered goat meat (left) and some cow blood broth mixed with bile (right)

When I'm a guest at someone's house for dinner I eat what I'm given.

But when I visited a Masai Mara tribe in Tanzania I contemplated ditching that rule, as I was handed a cup of cow's blood broth.

The steaming liquid had a slight green colour and someone kindly told me the blood had been mixed with a spot of bile. Splendid.


  • MailOnline Travel's Sadie Whitelocks reveals the things she's eaten on her travels
  • While visiting a Masai Mara tribe in Tanzania she was given a cow's blood broth
  • At an event in New York the martinis came served with sheep's eyeballs

Published: 10:50 BST, 7 June 2017 | Updated: 21:11 BST, 8 June 2017

Vegetarians and the squeamish, stop reading now.

MailOnline Travel's Sadie Whitelocks has revealed some of the most stomach-churning things she's eaten on her travels.

Sheep's eyeballs, cow's blood broth and strips of bull's penis are among her more memorable snacks. Read on to hear about her indigestion-inducing food encounters, which are likely to deaden rather than rouse your appetite.

Grub's up! Sadie was once tasked with helping the famed Bug Chef, David George Gordon, prepare canapés for an event in New York

I was once tasked with helping the famed Bug Chef, David George Gordon, prepare canapés for an event in New York.

The quirky kitchen hand, who is the author of numerous books including the Eat-a-Bug Cookbook, is known for experimenting with a range of unusual ingredients including crickets, spiders and dragonflies.

My task for the day was dressing dozens of giant mole crickets so they looked a little more edible.

Over the course of about three hours, I wrapped hundreds of large crickets in thick cuts of bacon, with pineapple chunks skewered through the centre.

At the event I got to try one of my creations. The chunky bacon was divine - lovely and smoky - but the cricket was crunchy.

After giving the insect a good chomp, I felt like it burst in my mouth and the innards weren't tasty. It was very leggy and had a musty cardboard-like flavour. I definitely needed to check my teeth after for bits of leg and wing.

Hairy encounter: The Bug Chef also likes to rustle up tarantulas. He singes off all the hairs before dunking them in a light batter and deep frying them

During my day with the Bug Chef I also watched him prepare tarantulas.

It gave me shivers down my spine as hundreds of spiders lay motionless in catering trays.

David freezes the tarantulas first, then removes their abdomens before singeing off all of their hairs with a blow torch.

He says the hairs are irritants, and if you don't prepare the tarantulas properly, you can make people ill.

He finishes them off by dunking them in a light batter and deep-frying them. I had to admit, they weren't too bad and had a nice crispiness but I couldn't help think about what I was eating.

Suddenly the nursery rhyme There Was an Old Lady sprang to mind. 'There was an old lady who swallowed a spider, That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her.'

Thankfully no wriggling or jiggling occurred.

A supper to remember: While visiting a Masai Mara tribe, Sadie was offered goat meat (left) and some cow blood broth mixed with bile (right)

When I'm a guest at someone's house for dinner I eat what I'm given.

But when I visited a Masai Mara tribe in Tanzania I contemplated ditching that rule, as I was handed a cup of cow's blood broth.

The steaming liquid had a slight green colour and someone kindly told me the blood had been mixed with a spot of bile. Splendid.


Watch the video: The Explorers Club - Forever (September 2021).