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Shellfish Recall in Long Island Sound


Connecticut officials recall shellfish in response to dangerous bacteria

A harmful bacteria has been detected in Long Island Sound shellfish as result of warmer water temperatures.

Yesterday, Connecticut officials announced a recall of shellfish in the Long Island Sound area. The recall includes oysters, mussels, and various kinds of clams harvested in Norwalk and Westport between July 3 and August 2.

Due to the naturally occurring bacterium found in the shellfish, vibrio parahaemolyticus, at least five people have gotten sick. The bacteria manifested due to warm water temperatures, which makes sense for the middle of the summer — yet this is the first time shellfish has been recalled in the area for this particular reason.

Symptoms of infection appear within a day of consumption and include nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Medical treatment is not necessary, but those affected should make sure to drink plenty of liquids to replace those lost during illness.

So if you live near Long Island Sound, put that order of oysters on the half-shell on hold and order something else for your seafood fix. For what it’s worth, lobster prices are going down.


A $75,000 federal grant newly awarded to Connecticut Sea Grant will advance the goal of restoring shellfish beds in Long Island Sound, opening the way for the commercial, recreational and environmental benefits that could result.

“This effort will help us to identify areas throughout the Sound that are available for restoration, and tell us what’s really suitable,” said Tessa Getchis, aquaculture extension specialist with Connecticut Sea Grant.

The grant project, which will be conducted in partnership with the state Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Aquaculture and the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, will fund analysis of GIS maps that show environmental conditions and human use patterns in various areas of the Sound. It would include a preliminary map of potential shellfish restoration areas to help state agencies facilitate discussions with interested parties about where and how efforts should be focused, Getchis said. Project partners will work in collaboration with town shellfish and harbor management commissions, city planners, coastal engineers and the commercial shellfishing industry to better understand local opportunities and constraints.

Town agencies, environmental professionals and groups interested in joining as partners in the project are encouraged to contact Getchis. Work will begin this fall, with a report identifying potential restoration areas to be released in two years. The report could be used as the basis for various groups to apply for funding to undertake specific restoration projects, Getchis said.

“This will put restoration practitioners in a position to get their projects funded,” she said. “We also want to provide funding agencies the confidence that they are funding high priority, state-supported efforts.”

Currently, about 20 percent of Connecticut waters of the Sound are already designated for commercial or recreational shellfishing – mainly clams and oysters. That amounts to approximately 80,000 acres of the total 388,000 acres of the state’s portion of the estuary it shares with New York State. The state’s commercial shellfishing industry generates an estimated $30 million in revenue annually. But non-harvested beds are also desirable for the important ecosystem functions they perform.

Rebuilding historic shellfish beds for the habitat value they provide to other estuarine organisms, as well as to improve water quality and stabilize shorelines against erosion, has been a goal of Long Island Sound restoration plans for more than a decade, according to Harry Yamalis, environmental analyst with DEEP.

Recent interest in restoration projects has come from a variety of other private and governmental groups. The Connecticut Shellfish Initiative, a project launched in 2014 to spur the growth of aquaculture, also pointed to the need to address hurdles to shellfish bed restoration to help achieve the associated ecosystem benefits.

“We’re trying to bring all the groups together that have an interest in restoration, so that they can lend their expertise to this planning process,” Getchis said.

Yamalis, a member of the shellfish initiative’s steering committee, said he and others are looking to promote the restoration of oyster reefs for their habitat value, where no harvesting would be allowed.

Workers at Briarpatch Enterprises unload clams harvested from beds in Milford on Oct. 24 onto a conveyor belt attached to a refrigerator truck that takes the shellfish to the company’s processing facility. Judy Benson / Connecticut Sea Grant.

David Carey, director of the state Bureau of Aquaculture, noted that shellfish beds have historically been an important part of the Long Island Sound ecosystem and key contributor to the state’s economy. Multi-million dollar investments to upgrade wastewater treatment plants over the last three decades have set the stage for a resurgence in shellfish growth, particularly oysters.

“This effort has a high degree of probable success because of Connecticut’s favorable water quality and its abundant healthy oyster resource that continues to recruit strongly,” Carey said.

The future task, he added, will be to manage the new beds so that investment in restoration pays off over the long-term. One of the main challenges facing areas suitable for restoration is the accumulation of fine sediments carried with river and stream flows, Carey noted. These must be controlled for shellfish beds to flourish.

Carey added that the areas most in need of restoration may be that way because of impaired water quality, and that the state will also need to ensure that there is adequate outreach to enforce closures of areas off-limits to public harvest.


Temperature Extremes

Rising average air and water temperatures, as well as more extreme heat waves and cold spells, are likely to affect aquaculture. Farmed shellfish may be stressed or die as a result of extreme temperatures and exposure. It is likely that shellfish farmers will also have to deal with new pests and pathogens.

Impacts to cultivated shellfish need to be monitored. Extreme temperatures may also expose workers to challenging and potentially unsafe working conditions. In Connecticut, farmers have already been dealing with the impacts of a pathogenic bacteria of concern. Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a naturally occurring bacteria that can sicken consumers when shellfish are eaten raw. This bacteria proliferates at higher temperatures. To minimize product exposure to extreme heat, regulators have recently required actions such as reduced trip lengths and rapid cooling of shellfish on the boat using ice (Connecticut Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Aquaculture). These modifications of storage and shipping practices are helping the shellfish industry adapt to and mitigate the effects of foodborne pathogens in a changing climate. Some shellfish farmers are experimentally growing native sugar kelp (Saccharina latissima). This is used as a food ingredient in specialty markets. In Connecticut this kelp is already growing at the southern limit of its distribution. The crop has been initially successful. The future for this industry is unknown because of a shift in temperatures due to climate change.

PHOTO | Workers at Briarpatch Enterprises in Milford, CT, load and unload clams onto a machine that sorts and bags the shellfish according to size. Photos by Judy Benson, Connecticut Sea Grant.


Shellfish Closures

Please note: the shellfish lands descriptions of this regulation may be superseded by temporary closures, which are described on the Temporary Shellfish Closures page. In addition, we have added text (shown in red and preceded by ***) and maps that are not included on the actual regulation. These are for guidance only.

Contents:

§41.0 Introduction

The following is a statement of sanitary condition of shellfish lands in New York State. Notice of changes in classification will be sent to baymen by mail as and when they may occur.

Whenever used in this Part:

The term mile refers to statute mile.

The term monument refers to a permanent post or marker placed on or near the shore by the Department of Environmental Conservation to serve as a landmark in establishing the lines of closure.

§41.1 Shellfish Lands in Westchester, Bronx, Kings, New York, Richmond, Queens Counties.

(a) All shellfish lands in Westchester, Bronx, Kings, New York, Richmond and Queens Counties, except those lands listed in subdivision (b) of this section, are in such sanitary condition that the shellfish thereon shall not be taken for use as food, and such lands are designated as uncertified areas.

(b) Atlantic Ocean. All that area of the Atlantic Ocean within the three-mile New York State jurisdictional limit lying easterly of a line originating at the southeasternmost corner of the Silver Gull Club building (located at the foot of and to the west of Beach 193rd Street, at the western limit of Fort Tilden, in Rockaway Point, local landmarks) and extending southeasterly to lighted whistle buoy "A" (RW "A" Mo(A) WHIS RACON "N" -·) at position 40° 27' 27.991" N, 073° 50' 12.228" W (located at the approach to Ambrose Channel), and all that area of the Atlantic Ocean within the three-mile New York State jurisdictional limit lying southerly and westerly of a line extending southwesterly from breakwater light Fl 4s 34ft 4M (located at the tip of the jetty at the southern entrance to East Rockaway Inlet) to Buoy RW "ER" Mo (A) BELL, and thence continuing northwesterly to the southeasternmost end of the southeasternmost apartment building of Dayton Towers (located at 7400 Shore Front Parkway, Arverne, local names and local landmarks), is in such sanitary condition that the shellfish thereon may be taken for use as food, and such area is designated as certified.

Note: All reference points in this section, except local landmarks and local names, are taken from N.O.A.A. Nautical Chart No. 12326, 53rd Ed., Jan. 2016 and Light List Volume 1, 2019.

§41.2 Shellfish Lands in Nassau County

Towns Listed In Alphabetical Order.

Subdivision (b) The following shellfish lands in Nassau County are in such sanitary condition that shellfish thereon shall not be taken for use as food and such lands are designated as uncertified areas.

(1) Town of Hempstead.

(i) Jamaica Bay. All of Jamaica Bay and its tributaries lying within the Town of Hempstead.

*** For current information about temporary closures of shellfish lands please refer to: the DEC website.

(a) All that area of the Atlantic Ocean, East Rockaway Inlet, Reynolds Channel and tributaries lying northerly and within the boundaries of a line extending southwesterly from Fl R 4 sec 33 feet (located at the tip of the jetty at the southern entrance to East Rockaway Inlet) to Buoy RW "ER" Mo (A) BELL and thence continuing northwesterly to the southeasternmost end of the southeasternmost apartment building of Dayton Towers (located at 7400 Shore Front Parkway, Arverne, local names and local landmarks) and all that area of Reynolds Channel and tributaries.

(b) All that area of Reynolds Channel, Hempstead Bay, Sloop Channel, Jones Inlet and all other bays, creeks, canals and tributaries located west of the southbound lanes of the Meadowbrook State Parkway and lying west and north of a line extending southwesterly from the southbound lanes of the Fundy Channel Bridge of Meadowbrook Parkway connecting the southeast tip of Pettit Marsh to West Crow Island and continuing to the easternmost point of land of High Meadow Island and continuing southerly to the northwestern base of the Loop Parkway Bridge at the easternmost point of land at Alder Island and continuing along the northwestern shoreline of Alder Island to the southbound lanes of the Loop Parkway Bridge and continuing along the southern shore of Alder Island east of the Loop parkway bridge to the orange marker located 600 feet north of the easternmost boundary of the Town of Hempstead Conservation waterways East Marina and west of a line extending southerly from said marker to the easternmost point of land on the eastern boundary of the Town of Hempstead Conservation Waterways East Marina at Point Lookout.

(c) All that area of East Bay, Hempstead Bay, and tributaries lying northerly of a line extending northwesterly between the westernmost point of land of Great (Low) Island and the southernmost point of land at Whaleneck Point.

(d) All that area of East Bay and all other bays, creeks, canals and tributaries lying north and west of a line extending southwesterly from the southernmost tip of Whaleneck Point to the northernmost tip of Big Crow Island at Ned's Creek and continuing along the western shore of Big Crow Island and continuing to the southwestern corner of the Fundy Channel Bridge of the Meadowbrook Parkway on West Crow Island.

(e) During the period of November 1 through May 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of East Bay and all other bays, creeks, canals and tributaries lying north of a line extending easterly from the southwestern corner of the Fundy Channel Bridge of the Meadowbrook Parkway on West Crow Island to the northeasternmost end of the bascule Sloop Channel Bridge of the Wantagh State Parkway connecting Green Island with Jones Beach State Park, and west of a line extending northerly along the western shoreline of Green Island to the southeastern tip of the fixed Goose Creek Bridge of the Wantagh State Parkway, connecting Green Island with Great (Low) Island, then continuing northerly along the eastern side of the Goose Creek Bridge to the northeastern tip of the Goose Creek Bridge, then continuing northerly around the western shoreline of Great (Low) Island to the westernmost point of Great (Low) Island, and continuing northwesterly to the southernmost point of land at Whaleneck Point, and lying south and east of a line extending southwesterly to the northernmost tip of Big Crow Island at Neds Creek, continuing along the western shore of Big Crow Island, to the southwestern corner of the Fundy Channel Bridge of the Meadowbrook Parkway on West Crow Island.

(f) Short Beach Boat Basin. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of the Short Beach Boat Basin, including entrance channels, lying southerly of Sloop Channel.

(a) All that area of the Atlantic Ocean and tributaries within the three-mile New York State jurisdictional limit lying westerly of a line originating at the southeasternmost corner of the Silver Gull Club building (located at the foot of and to the west of Beach 193rd Street, at the western limit of Fort Tilden, in Rockaway Point, local landmarks) and extending southeasterly to lighted whistle buoy "A" (RW "A" Mo(A) WHIS RACON "N" -·) at position 40° 27' 27.991" N, 073° 50' 12.228" W (located at the approach to Ambrose Channel), and all that area of the Atlantic Ocean, East Rockaway Inlet, Reynolds Channel and tributaries lying northerly and within the boundaries of a line extending southwesterly from breakwater light Fl 4s 34ft 4M(located at the tip of the jetty at the southern entrance to East Rockaway Inlet) to Buoy RW "ER" Mo (A) BELL, and thence continuing northwesterly to the southeasternmost end of the southeasternmost apartment building of Dayton Towers (located at 7400 Shore Front Parkway, Arverne, local names and local landmarks) and all that area of Reynolds Channel and tributaries.

(b) All that area of the Atlantic Ocean lying within a one-half nautical mile distance from any portion of the sewer outfall serving the Cedar Creek Water Pollution Control Plant (local name).

(c) Jones Inlet. All that area within Jones Inlet and the Atlantic Ocean lying north of a line extending southeasterly from the peak of the easternmost cupola of the Pink Hotel (local name, local landmark) to the Jones Inlet Light tower (located at the southern tip of the eastern jetty of Jones Inlet) and west of a line extending northerly from the Jones Inlet Light tower to the easternmost tip of the rock jetty at the eastern end of Lido Boulevard, Point Lookout (local landmark).

(a) All that area of South Oyster Bay and Great South Bay, including tributaries, creeks, and canals, between the east side of the northbound lanes of the Wantagh Parkway and the west side of the southbound lanes of the Robert Moses Causeway lying within one-half mile of the mainland (Northern) shoreline.

(1) All that area of South Oyster Bay, including tributaries, creeks and canals, lying north of a line extending easterly from the northeasternmost point of land of Great Island (west of Great Island Channel and south of The Run) to the southeasternmost point of land of Goose Island (southwest of Massapequa Creek).

(b) During the period September 1 through March 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of South Oyster Bay, including tributaries, creeks and canals, lying northerly of a line extending northeasterly from the northeasternmost end of the Sloop Channel Bridge (bascule bridge connecting the southern end of Green Island with Jones Beach) to the easternmost point of land of the group of islands known as South Line Island, Black Banks Island and Waterhole Island (local names, local landmarks) thence proceeding northerly across Bulkhead Drain to the northeasternmost point of land at Thatch Island (local name, local landmark, located at the eastern end of North Line Island) thence proceeding easterly to the southernmost point of land at West Island thence proceeding northeasterly to the northernmost point of land at Sand Island (Helicopter Island, immediately east of the Amityville Cut) and thence proceeding northwesterly to the southeasternmost point of the dock at the Unqua Corinthian Yacht Club (local name, local landmark).

(c) During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of South Oyster Bay, the State Boat Channel and tributaries lying southerly and westerly of a line extending easterly from the northeasternmost end of the Sloop Channel Bridge of the Wantagh State Parkway - Jones Beach Causeway (southern tip of Green Island) to the westernmost point of land at South Line Island thence proceeding southeasterly to the eastern side of the eastern entrance to Zachs Bay.

(a) During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Zachs Bay, including tributaries lying southerly of the State Boat Channel.

(b) During the period January 1st through December 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Zachs Bay lying westerly of a line extending northerly from the northeasternmost corner of the three-colored brick building with covered patio (located on the southern shore of Zachs Bay and known locally as the "Pavilion," local names, local landmarks), through the adjacent wooden poles located in Zachs Bay to the opposite shoreline.

Note: All reference points, except local landmarks or local names, in the Town of Hempstead are taken from N.O.A.A. Nautical Charts No. 12352, 35th Ed., Feb. 2016 and/or No. 12326, 53rd Ed., Jan. 2016 and U.S.C.G. Light List Volume 1, 2020.

(2) Town of Oyster Bay (South Shore).

(a) All that area of South Oyster Bay and Great South Bay, including tributaries, creeks and canals, between the east side of the northbound lanes of the Wantagh Parkway and the west side of the southbound lanes of the Robert Moses Causeway lying within one-half mile of the mainland (Northern) shoreline.

(b) During the period September 1 through March 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of South Oyster Bay, including tributaries, creeks and canals, lying northerly and westerly of a line extending northeasterly from the northeasternmost end of the Sloop Channel Bridge (bascule bridge connecting the southern end of Green Island with Jones Beach) to the easternmost point of land of the group of islands known as South Line Island, Black Banks Island and Water Hole Island (local names, local landmarks) thence proceeding northerly across Bulkhead Drain to the northeasternmost point of land at Thatch Island (local landmark, located at the eastern end of North Line Island) thence proceeding easterly to the southernmost point of land at West Island thence proceeding northeasterly to the northernmost point of land at Sand Island (Helicopter Island, immediately east of the Amityville Cut) and thence proceeding northwesterly to the southeasternmost point of the dock at the Unqua Corinthian Yacht Club (local name, local landmark).

(c) During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of South Oyster Bay, the State Boat Channel and tributaries lying southerly and westerly of a line extending easterly from the northeasternmost end of the Sloop Channel Bridge of the Wantagh State Parkway - Jones Beach Causeway (southern tip of Green Island) to the westernmost point of land at South Line Island thence proceeding southeasterly to the eastern side of the eastern entrance to Zachs Bay.

(ii) Atlantic Ocean. All that area in the Atlantic Ocean lying within a one-half nautical mile distance of any portion of the sewer outfall line serving the Cedar Creek Water Pollution Control Plant, the location of which is indicated as "outfall" on Nautical Charts No. 12352 and No. 12326 referenced below (see note).

(a) During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Zachs Bay, including tributaries, lying southerly of the State Boat Channel.

(b) During the period January 1st through December 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Zachs Bay lying westerly of a line extending northerly from the northeasternmost corner of the three-colored brick building with covered patio (located on the southern shore of Zachs Bay and known locally as the "Pavilion," local names, local landmarks), through the adjacent wooden poles located in Zachs Bay to the opposite shoreline.

(iv) Tobay Marina-Boat Basin (local name).

(a) All that area of Tobay Heading (local name) and its tributaries in the western boat basin of the Town of Oyster Bay Tobay Marina.

(b) During the period May 15th through September 30th, both dates inclusive, all that area of the eastern boat basin at the Town of Oyster Bay Tobay Marina (local name) and its tributaries.

(v) Seaford Harbor Yacht Club. During the period May [15th through September 30th,] 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of the marina-boat basin, including entrance channel, serving the Seaford Harbor Yacht Club (located between Tobay Marina and the marina-boat basin at West Gilgo).

Note: All reference points, except local landmarks or local names, in the Town of Oyster Bay (South Shore) are taken from N.O.A.A. Nautical Charts No. 12352, 35th Ed., Feb. 2016 and/or No. 12326, 38th Ed., Feb. 1986.

(3) Town of North Hempstead.

(a) All that area of Long Island Sound, including tributaries, lying northerly and westerly of a line extending northeasterly from the northernmost point of land at Prospect Point to the northernmost point of land at Matinecock Point and, thence continuing in a northeasterly direction on a true bearing north 18 degrees east (magnetic bearing north 30 degrees east) from Matinecock Point to the New York-Connecticut State boundary.

(b) All tributaries of Long Island Sound between Matinecock Point and Middle Chimney west of Oak Neck Point (local names, local landmarks).

(a) All that area of Hempstead Harbor, including tributaries, lying southerly of a line extending northeasterly from the westernmost chimney on the seaward side of the large brown house (situated on the bluff within Sands Point Park and Preserve) located approximately 1,300 yards northwesterly of Mott Point, to the westernend of the rock jetty at Red Spring Point, on the opposite eastern shoreline, and then continuing along the northeasterly side of said jetty to the shore. Said jetty forms the northern enclosure of the private marina serving The Legend Yacht and Beach Club Community on Pembroke Drive, Glen Cove (local names, local landmarks).

(b) All that area of East Creek (the tidal creek and wetlands) located southerly of Prospect Point.

(c) All that area of West Pond and that portion of Hempstead Harbor lying between lines extending 500 feet northwesterly from the seaward ends of the rock jetties on each side of the entrance to West Pond (local names, local landmarks).

(d) All that area of Hempstead Harbor lying within 250 yards of the seaward end of the rock jetty at the City of Glen Cove's Crescent Beach at the foot of Crescent Beach Road, on the eastern shore of Hempstead Harbor (local names, local landmarks).

(iii) Dosoris Pond. All that area of Dosoris Pond.

(iv) Frost Creek. All that area of Frost Creek and all that area of Long Island Sound within 400 yards in all directions of the northernmost end of the jetty located on the eastern side of the entrance to Frost Creek.

(4) Town of Oyster Bay (North Shore).

(a) All that area of Long Island Sound, including tributaries, lying northerly and westerly of a long extending northeasterly from the northern point of land at Prospect Point to the northernmost point of land at Matinecock Point and, thence continuing in a northeasterly direction on a true bearing north 18 degrees east (magnetic bearing north 30 degrees east) from Matinecock Point to the New York-Connecticut State boundary.

(b) All tributaries of Long Island Sound between Matinecock Point and Middle Chimney west of Oak Neck Point (local names, local landmarks).

(a) All that area of Hempstead Harbor, including tributaries, lying southerly of a line extending northeasterly from the westernmost chimney on the seaward side of the large brown house (situated on the bluff within Sands Point Park and Preserve) located approximately 1,300 yards northwesterly of Mott Point, to the western end of the rock jetty at Red Spring Point, on the opposite eastern shoreline, and then continuing along the northeasterly side of said jetty to the shore. Said jetty forms the northern enclosure of the private marina serving The Legend Yacht and Beach Club Community on Pembroke Drive, Glen Cove (local names, local landmarks).

(b) All that area of East Creek (the tidal creek and wetlands) located southerly of Prospect Point.

(c) All that area of West Pond and that portion of Hempstead Harbor lying between lines extending 500 feet northwesterly from the seaward ends of the rock jetties on each side of the entrance to West Pond (local names, local landmarks).

(d) All that area of Hempstead Harbor lying within 250 yards of the seaward end of the rock jetty at the City of Glen Cove's Crescent Beach at the foot of Crescent Beach Road, on the eastern shore of Hempstead Harbor (local names, local landmarks).

(iii) Dosoris Pond. All that are of Dosoris Pond.

(iv) Frost Creek. All that area of Frost Creek and all that area of Long Island Sound within 400 yards in all directions of the northernmost end of the jetty located on the eastern side of the entrance to Frost Creek.

(a) All that area, including tributaries, lying southerly of a line extending northwesterly from the northernmost point of land on the west shore of The Cove (Oyster Bay Cove), known locally as Weeks Point, to buoy GR "B" (identified locally as JB "B") located in the main channel south of Moses Point and thence continuing westerly to buoy G C "5" located in the main channel southeast of Brickyard Point, thence continuing southwesterly to the northeasternmost corner of the earth filled bulkhead at Jakobsen's Shipyard (local landmark).

(b) All that area, including tributaries, lying south of a line extending northwesterly from the flagpole near shore at Roosevelt Memorial Park at Oyster Bay (local landmark) to the traffic light located at the intersection of Cleft Road and Shore Drive, Mill Neck (local landmark).

(c) All that area, including tributaries, lying northerly of a line extending westerly from the southernmost tip of Plum Point to the southernmost tip of the dock located in front of the main clubhouse of the Seawanhaka-Corinthian Yacht Club (local landmarks).

(1) During the period January 1st through December 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of the Cove, including tributaries, lying southerly of a line extending easterly from the northernmost point of land at Weeks Point (local name, local landmark) to utility pole "LIL 22" located between Cove Neck Road and the shoreline, at the former site of the Village of Cove Neck police booth (local names, local landmarks).

(2) During the period May 1st through October 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of the Cove, including tributaries, lying easterly and southerly of a line extending northeasterly from the northernmost point of land at Weeks Point to the southwestern end of the Roosevelt Breakwater (local name, local landmark) and thence continuing along said breakwater to the easterly shoreline of Cove Neck.

*** (also see: Oyster Bay Harbor/Oyster Bay Cove Conditional Program) Those portions of Oyster Bay Harbor and Oyster Bay Cove designated as a conditional areas remains uncertified when there is no conditional program in effect, and during any period when the conditional program is in the "closed" status.

(e) During the period May 1st through October 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area lying easterly of the Bayville Bridge and northerly and westerly of a line extending northeasterly from the utility pole NYT 99, opposite the foot of The Concourse (a private road into Mill Neck Estates) and located between West Shore Road and the concrete seawall adjacent to the shoreline, to the southwesternmost corner of the fixed wooden dock, west of the boat launching ramp, at the Village of Bayville Beach, on West Harbor Drive (local names, local landmarks).

(vi) Mill Neck Creek (Mill Neck Bay). All that area, including tributaries, lying westerly of the Bascule Bridge which connects the Villages of Mill Neck and Bayville (local names).

(a) During the period January 1st through December 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area including tributaries south and east of a line extending southerly from the seaward end of the dock serving the Cold Spring Harbor Beach Club (local landmark) to the western extremity of the white house (known as the Gale House) located on the shoreline immediately west of Cold Spring Beach (local landmark), on the campus of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.

(b) During the period May 1st through October 15th, both dates inclusive, all that area including tributaries south and east of a line extending westerly from the seaward end of the dock serving the Cold Spring Harbor Beach Club (local landmark) to the flag pole situated near the village hall of the Village of Laurel Hollow, 1492 Laurel Hollow Road (local landmark).

(c) During the period May 1st through October 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Eel Creek (local name) located at the Sagamore Hill National Historic Site and all that area within 250 yards in any direction of the southeastern corner of the bulkheading surrounding the stand of trees on the northern side of the entrance to the boat basin located immediately south of the Sagamore Hill National Historic Site.

Note: All reference points, except local landmarks or local names in the Town of Oyster Bay (North Shore), are taken from N.O.A.A. Nautical Chart Number 12365, 28th Ed., Oct. 2014.

§41.3 Shellfish Lands in Suffolk County

Towns Listed In Alphabetical Order.

Subdivision (b) The following shellfish lands in Suffolk County are in such sanitary condition that shellfish thereon shall not be taken for use as food and such lands are designated as uncertified areas.

(1) Town of Babylon.

(a) All that area of South Oyster Bay and Great South Bay, including tributaries, creeks and canals, between the east side of the northbound lanes of the Wantagh Parkway and the west side of the southbound lanes of the Robert Moses Causeway lying within one-half mile of the mainland (northern) shoreline.

(b) During the period September 1 through March 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Great South Bay and South Oyster Bay, including tributaries, creeks and canals lying northerly and westerly of a line extending northeasterly from the northeasternmost end of the Sloop Channel Bridge (bascule bridge connecting the southern end of Green Island with Jones Beach) to the easternmost point of land of the group of islands known as South Line Island, Black Banks Island and Water Hole Island (local names, local landmarks) thence proceeding northerly across Bulkhead Drain to the northeasternmost point of land at Thatch Island (local landmark, located at the eastern end of North Line Island) thence proceeding easterly to the southernmost point of land at West Island thence proceeding northeasterly to the northernmost point of land at Sand Island (Helicopter Island, immediately east of the Amityville Cut) and thence proceeding northwesterly to the southeasternmost point of the dock at the Unqua Corinthian Yacht Club (local name, local landmark).

(c) Town of Babylon Marinas. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area lying south of the State Boat Channel within the Town of Babylon Cedar Beach Marina (local name), and the Town of Babylon Gilgo Beach Marina (local name), including entrance channels to said marinas.

(d) Babylon Coves. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area lying south of the State Boat Channel of the marina-boat basin at West Gilgo and all that area lying south of the State Boat Channel of Coast Guard Cove (local name) and Hemlock Cove (local name), including entrance channels.

(e) Oak Island. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Great South Bay, including the Oak Island Channel, the State Boat Channel, and the "Lead" (local names), lying southerly and easterly of Oak Island and southerly of a line extending westerly from the westernmost point of land at Seganus Thatch at the former site of the State Channel Marina (local name), to the northernmost point of the bulkhead protecting the residence at number 58 Oak Island (said residence is a blue, one-story house with a grey roof), continuing southeasterly around the northeast facing shoreline of Oak Island to its easternmost tip and continuing southwesterly to a point located immediately opposite the residence at number 8 Oak Island and all that area lying easterly of a line extending southerly from the chimney at the western corner of the residence at number 8 Oak Island (said residence is a one-story wood shingle house with a green roof), proceeding southerly across the "Lead" (local name), to utility pole number 468 on the north side of Ocean Parkway, Jones Beach Island and all that area lying northerly of a line extending easterly from utility pole number 468 to utility pole number 478 on the north side of Ocean Parkway, Jones Beach Island and all that area lying westerly of a line extending northeasterly across the State Boat Channel to the southernmost point of land at Seganus Thatch, thence proceeding northwesterly along the shoreline to the westernmost point of land at Seganus Thatch.

(f) Robert Moses State Park. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area within the Robert Moses East and West Boat Basins including the area between the boat basins, lying south of a line extending easterly from the northwesternmost corner of the western bulkhead of the western basin to the northeasternmost corner of the eastern bulkhead of the eastern basin.

(g) Seaford Harbor Yacht Club. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of the marina-boat basin, including entrance channel, serving the Seaford Harbor Yacht Club (located between Tobay Marina and the marina-boat basin at West Gilgo).

(ii) Atlantic Ocean. All that area within one-half nautical mile distance from any portion of the sewer outfall pipe serving the water pollution control plant of the Suffolk County Sewer District No. 3, Southwest. The location of said pipe is identified as beginning at a point, 40 37' 57.5" N and 73 20' 57.5" W, on Cedar Island Beach and extending southwesterly on a bearing 184 28' 41" for approximately 4,940 yards to a point, 40 35' 31.5" N and 73 21' 12.5" W and thence extending southwesterly on a bearing 219 28' 22.6" for approximately 1,160 yards to a point, 40 35' 05" N and 73 21' 41.2" W.

Note: All reference points, except local names or local landmarks, are taken from N.O.A.A. Nautical Chart No. 12352, 20th edition, dated November 27, 1982.

(2) Town of Islip.

(a) All that area of South Oyster Bay and Great South Bay, including tributaries, creeks and canals, between the east side of the northbound lanes of the Wantagh Parkway and the west side of the southbound lanes of the Robert Moses Causeway lying within one-half mile of the mainland (northern) shoreline.

(b) All that area of Great South Bay, including tributaries, creeks, and canals, bounded on the west and south by a line extending from the northernmost point of land on the western side of the Robert Moses Causeway at the base of the western span to light pole number 109 (fifth aluminum light pole south of the base of the bridge on the west side of the west span) then continuing to the southwesternmost corner of the bath house serving the west bathing area at Heckscher State Park (located east of the entrance to the boat basin at Heckscher State Park).

(c) All that area of Nicoll Bay, Connetquot River, Brickiln Creek (local name) and all tributaries, creeks and canals lying north of a line extending northeasterly between Nicoll Point at the southernmost point of land at Heckscher State Park and a point lying 1830 yards south of the southwestern corner of the town dock at Blue Point Avenue.

(1) All that area adjacent to the shore of Fire Island at Ocean Beach south of a line extending northeasterly from the northeastern corner of the building housing Maguires Restaurant on Bungalow Walk at Ocean Beach (local landmark) to Channel Buoy C "15" and continuing southeasterly to Channel Buoy C "17," and thence southerly to the water tank at Sea View.

(2) During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Great South Bay adjacent to Fire Island and bounded on the west, north, and east by a line extending northerly from the western side of the entrance of the boat basin at Atlantique to the southernmost point of land at East Fire Island a line extending easterly from the southeasternmost point of land at East Fire Island to Range Channel Buoy 1 (GC Ƈ') and a line extending southeasterly from Range Channel Buoy 1 to the northeasternmost corner of the bulkhead on the east side of the entrance to the boat basin at Ocean Bay Park.

(e) Kismet and Saltaire. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area within the Saltaire Marina - Boat Basin (local name), and the Kismet Inn Marina- Boat Basin (local name).

(f) Clam Pond. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Clam Pond (local name) in and adjacent to the Village of Saltaire, lying southerly of a line extending easterly from the northeasternmost corner of the bulkhead protecting the property and residence located at 34 Pennant Walk, in the Village of Saltaire, to Fair Harbor Light 1 (Fl G 4s) and lying westerly of a line extending southwesterly to the northeasternmost corner of the eastern ferry dock at Fair Harbor thence proceeding southerly along the eastern side of the dock to the shoreline at Fair Harbor.

(g) All that area of the marina boat basin, including entrance canal, at Captree State Park.

(h) Robert Moses State Park. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area within the Robert Moses East and West Boat Basins including the area between the boat basins, lying south of a line extending easterly from the northwesternmost corner of the western bulkhead of the western basin to the northeasternmost corner of the eastern bulkhead of the eastern basin.

Note: All reference points, except local landmarks or local names, in the Town of Islip are taken from N.O.A.A. Nautical Chart No. 12352, 35th Ed., Feb. 2016 and U.S.C.G. Light List Volume 1, 2020.

(3) Town of Brookhaven (South Shore).

(a) All that area of Nicoll Bay, Connetquot River, Brickiln Creek (local name) and all tributaries, creeks and canals lying northerly of a line extending northeasterly between Nicoll Point at the southernmost point of land at Heckscher State Park and a point lying 1,830 yards due south of the southwestern corner of the town dock at Blue Point Avenue.

(b) Fire Island Pines. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Great South Bay lying within an area extending 1,000 feet northerly of the bulkheads forming the entrance to the harbor serving Fire Island Pines and extending 500 feet easterly and 500 feet westerly of the entrance to the harbor.

(c) Sailors Haven. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Great South Bay lying within an area extending 1,000 feet northerly of the entrance to the boat basin at Sailors Haven and extending 500 feet easterly and 500 feet westerly of the entrance to said boat basin.

(d) Barrett Beach. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Great South Bay lying within 1,000 feet of the shoreline that is within 500 feet easterly and 500 feet westerly of the Barrett Beach dock (local name, local landmark).

(e) Davis Park. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area adjacent to Davis Park lying within an area extending 1,000 feet northerly of the entrance to the harbor serving Davis Park and extending 500 feet easterly and 500 feet westerly of the entrance to said harbor.

(f) Watch Hill. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area adjacent to Watch Hill lying within an area extending 1,000 feet northerly of the entrance to the harbor serving Watch Hill and extending 500 feet easterly and 500 feet westerly of the entrance to said harbor.

(g) Cherry Grove. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area adjacent to Cherry Grove within the boundaries of a line extending northeasterly from the westernmost end of the wooden bulkhead protecting the shoreline at Cherry Grove (local landmark) to Channel Buoy R "4" Fl R 4 sec and then continuing southeasterly to the easternmost end of the wooden bulkhead protecting the shoreline at Cherry Grove (local landmark).

(1) All that area adjacent to the shore of Fire Island at Ocean Beach south of a line extending northeasterly from the northeastern corner of the building housing Maguires Restaurant on Bungalow Walk at Ocean Beach (local landmark) to Channel Buoy C "15" and continuing southeasterly to Channel Buoy C "17," and thence southerly to the water tank at Sea View.

(2) During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Great South Bay adjacent to Fire Island and bounded on the west, north, and east by a line extending northerly from the western side of the entrance of the boat basin at Atlantique to the southernmost point of land at East Fire Island a line extending easterly from the southeasternmost point of land at East Fire Island to Range Channel Buoy 1 (GC Ƈ') and a line extending southeasterly from Range Channel Buoy 1 to the northeasternmost corner of the bulkhead east side of the entrance to the boat basin at Ocean Bay Park.

(a) All that area of Great South Bay, Patchogue Bay and its tributaries lying northerly of a line extending easterly from the southeast corner of the wooden bulkhead located at the foot of Blue Point Avenue, Blue Point, to the southeastern corner of the southeasternmost residence on Rod Street, approximately 100 yards southeast of the foot of Dunton Avenue, West Bellport (said residence is a two-story house, white brick and light grey shingle, with light grey roof).

(b) All that area of Patchogue Bay and Bellport Bay lying within 300 yards of the southernmost point of land at Howells Point.

(c) During the period May 1st through September 30th, both dates inclusive, all that area of Great South Bay, Patchogue Bay and tributaries lying north of a line extending westerly from the southernmost tip of land at Howells Point (local landmark) to the southernmost tip of the fixed dock at the entrance to the boat basin at Sayville Yacht Club (local landmark).

(a) All that area of Bellport Bay, including tributaries, lying northerly of a line extending northeasterly from the flagstaff serving the Bellport Yacht Club, located at the foot of Bellport Lane in Bellport, to utility pole No. "43BBL," located at the foot of Bay Avenue (Bay Road) at Fireplace Neck (local landmark).

(b) All that area of Bellport Bay within a 500-foot radius of the flagstaff serving the Bellport Yacht Club located at the foot of Bellport Lane in Bellport.

(c) During the period May 15th through December 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Bellport Bay, lying north and east of a line extending southeast from the flagstaff serving the Bellport Yacht Club, located at the foot of Bellport Lane in Bellport, to the westernmost point of John Boyle Island and continuing southerly to the northernmost point of land east of the dock at Old Inlet and west of Hospital Island.

(d) All that area of Bellport Bay, Carmans River and tributaries lying northerly of a line extending southeasterly from the foot of Mott Lane (Gorman Lane), at Fireplace Neck, to the residence at 146 Grandview Drive in Shirley (local landmark, such residence is the southernmost house on the west side of Smith Point).

(e) All that area of Bellport Bay, including Shirley Basin, the entrance to Narrow Bay and tributaries, lying easterly of a line extending due south (magnetic) from the southernmost point of land at Smith Point to the opposite shoreline of the barrier beach.

(f) During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Bellport Bay within 100 yards in any direction from the marina area docks at Bellport Beach.

(g) All that area of Patchogue Bay and Bellport Bay lying within 300 yards of the southernmost point of land at Howells Point.

(a) During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all creeks, canals, coves, and tributaries, including Shirley Basin, Unchachogue Creek, Johns Neck Creek, Sheeppen Creek (Section 5 Marina), Pattersquash Creek, and Mastic Beach Yacht Club Canal (Section 1 Marina), located along the shoreline between Smith Point and Floyd Point (local names, local landmarks).

(b) During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Narrow Bay and its tributaries lying westerly of a line extending southerly from the westernmost point of the landward side of the public fishing dock located at the foot of Cranberry Drive, Mastic Beach (local name, local landmark) to a monument located on the opposite southern shoreline (local landmark) and, east of a line extending due south (magnetic) from the southernmost point of land at Smith Point to the opposite shoreline of the barrier beach.

(c) During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Narrow Bay lying northerly of a line extending easterly from the northeastern corner of the residence at 542 Riviera Drive, Mastic Beach [(said residence is a two-story structure painted dark green with a tan-colored turret)] to the northwestern corner of the residence at 205 Riviera Drive, Mastic Beach.

(d) During the period April 15 to December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Narrow Bay and its tributaries lying easterly of a line extending southerly from the westernmost point of the landward side of the public fishing dock located at the foot of Cranberry Drive, Mastic Beach (local landmark) to a monument located on the opposite southern shoreline (local landmark) and, westerly of a line extending southerly from the southeasternmost corner of the property at 39 Washington Drive, Mastic Beach (said corner is the northwesternmost edge of the intersection of Washington Drive and Riviera Drive in Mastic Beach) to a monument on the opposite southern shoreline (local landmark).

(a) Forge River and Creeks. During the period of January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Moriches Bay and its tributaries, including Home Creek, Forge River, Old Neck Creek, Mud Creek, Areskonk Creek, and Orchard Neck Creek, north of a line extending northeasterly from the monument located near the shoreline at the southeastern tip of Forge Point to the southwestern corner of the foot of Belleview Avenue, Center Moriches (local name).

(b) Terrell River. During the period of January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Moriches Bay within 500 feet of the Terrell River mouth, and all of the Terrell River in its entirety.

(c) East Moriches Boat Basins. During the period May 1 through November 30, both dates inclusive, all that area of Moriches Bay lying within a 600-foot radius from the southernmost point of the property at 159 Bay Avenue, East Moriches, including all that area of the boat basins at 159 Bay Avenue and 71 Smith Street in East Moriches (formerly Cerullo Brothers and Tadsens Fishing Stations).

(d) Great Gun Beach. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area lying within 500 feet from any portion of the bulkheading and fixed or floating dock structures at Great Gun Beach Marina (Town of Brookhaven), and all of the adjacent unnamed cove lying south of a line extending due west from the westernmost corner of the bulkheading of said marina.

(1) During the period of January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Tuthill Cove and tributaries north of a line extending northeasterly from the easternmost tip of Tuthill Point to the cupola located on the roof of the Moriches Coast Guard Station (local landmark).

(2) During the period of May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Moriches Bay bounded by a line extending southwesterly from the cupola located on the roof of the Moriches Coast Guard Station (located within the Town of Brookhaven) to the easternmost tip of Tuthill Point thence continuing southeast to Lighted Buoy "23" Fl G 2.5 sec thence continuing easterly to Lighted Buoy "24" Fl R 2.5 sec thence extending northwesterly back to the point of beginning.

(1) During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Hart Cove, Seatuck Cove, and their tributaries lying north of a line extending northeasterly from the northeastern corner of the residence at 73 Moriches Island Road, East Moriches (said residence is located approximately 100 yards north of the foot of Moriches Island Road) to the southernmost point of land at Havens Point and thence continuing to the flagpole located at the residence at 39 Basketneck Lane, Remsenburg (local landmark said residence is located approximately 100 yards southeast of the entrance to Fish Creek on the eastern shoreline of Seatuck Cove).

(2) During the period May 1 through November 30, both dates inclusive, all that area of Moriches Bay lying north of a line extending northeasterly from the cupola located on the roof of the Moriches Coast Guard Station (located within the Town of Brookhaven) to the foot of Rodgers Lane in Remsenburg (local name, local landmark) and, lying south of a line extending northeasterly from the northeastern corner of the residence at 73 Moriches Island Road, East Moriches (said residence is located approximately 100 yards north of the foot of Moriches Island Road) to the southernmost point of land at Havens Point and thence continuing to the flagpole located at the residence at 39 Basketneck Lane, Remsenburg (local landmark said residence is located approximately 100 yards southeast of the entrance to Fish Creek on the eastern shoreline of Seatuck Cove).

Note: All reference points in the Town of Brookhaven (South Shore) are taken from N.O.A.A. Nautical Chart No. 12352, 36th Ed., May 2020, and U.S.C.G. Light List Volume 1, 2020, except as indicated as "local landmark" or "local name."

(4) Town of Southampton.

(1) During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Hart Cove, Seatuck Cove, and their tributaries lying north of a line extending northeasterly from the northeastern corner of the residence at 73 Moriches Island Road, East Moriches (said residence is located approximately 100 yards north of the foot of Moriches Island Road) to the southernmost point of land at Havens Point and thence continuing to the flagpole located at the residence at 39 Basketneck Lane, Remsenburg (local landmark said residence is located approximately 100 yards southeast of the entrance to Fish Creek on the eastern shoreline of Seatuck Cove).

(2) During the period May 1 through November 30, both dates inclusive, all that area of Moriches Bay lying north of a line extending northeasterly from the cupola located on the roof of the Moriches Coast Guard Station (located within the Town of Brookhaven) to the foot of Rodgers Lane, Remsenburg and, all that area of Moriches Bay lying south of a line extending northeasterly from the northeastern corner of the residence at 73 Moriches Island Road, East Moriches (said residence is located approximately 100 yards north of the foot of Moriches Island Road) to the southernmost point of land at Havens Point and thence continuing to the flagpole located at the residence at 39 Basketneck Lane, Remsenburg (local landmark said residence is located approximately 100 yards southeast of the entrance to Fish Creek on the eastern shoreline of Seatuck Cove).

(b) West Hampton Yacht Squadron. During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Moriches Bay within a 500-foot radius of the southernmost point of the westernmost breakwater protecting the entrance canal serving the Westhampton Yacht Squadron, Remsenburg (local name, local landmark).

(1) During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Speonk Cove, Speonk River, and all other canals and tributaries of said cove and river, lying north of a line extending northeasterly from the southeasternmost tip of Speonk Point to the southwestern corner of the gazebo located near the shoreline of the property at 5 Jagger Lane, Westhampton (local landmark).

(2) During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area, including tributaries, north of a line extending easterly from the southernmost tip of land at Tanners Neck (local landmark) to the southeasternmost point of land, at the southeast corner of the property located at 15 Fiske Avenue, Westhampton Beach.

(3) During the period May 1 through November 30, both dates inclusive, all that area of Moriches Bay lying north of a line extending easterly from the southeasternmost tip of Speonk Point to the southeasternmost point of land, at the southeast corner of the property located at 15 Fiske Avenue, Westhampton Beach except as noted in this subparagraph.

(d) During the period May 1 through November 30, both dates inclusive, all that area of Moriches Bay lying east of a line extending south from the southeasternmost point of land at the southeast corner of the property located at 15 Fiske Avenue, Westhampton Beach, to the top of the conical shaped building of the Le Ronde Beach Club, at 297 Dune Road, Westhampton Beach (local names, local landmarks), and west of the Jessup Lane Bascule Bridge in Westhampton Beach.

(e) All other creeks, canals, and rivers located along the shoreline between the foot of Remsen Lane, Remsenburg, and the Jessup Lane Bascule Bridge in Westhampton Beach (local names, local landmark).

(ii) Quantuck Bay. Unless otherwise described in this subparagraph, from April 1 through December 14, both dates inclusive, all that area of Moneybogue Bay, Quantuck Canal, Quantuck Bay, Aspatuck Creek, Quantuck Creek, Ogden Pond, and Quogue Canal lying easterly of the Jessup Lane bascule bridge in Westhampton Beach and westerly of the Post Lane bascule bridge in Quogue.

(a) Moneybogue Bay (local name) and Quantuck Canal.

(1) Moneybogue Bay. During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all canals on the northwestern shoreline of Moneybogue Bay in Westhampton Beach and, all that area of Moneybogue Bay including tributaries, lying north of a line that runs southeasterly along the northern edge of the fixed dock serving the residence of 3 Old Meadow Bend, Westhampton Beach to the northeastern corner of said dock then extends northeasterly on a true bearing north 70 degrees east, to the opposite, eastern shoreline.

(2) Quantuck Canal. During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all the area of the canal on the northern shoreline of Quantuck Canal, lying north of a line extending from the southeastern end of the bulkhead serving the residence of 178 Beach Lane, Westhampton Beach to southernmost corner of the dock serving the residence of 129 Seafield Point, Westhampton Beach.

(b) Quantuck Bay, Aspatuck Creek, and Quantuck Creek.

(1) Quantuck Bay. During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of the tributary (said tributary is located between Meadow Lane and Quantuck Lane in Quogue) lying north and west of a line extending from the northeasternmost corner of the house at 36 Meadow Lane, Quogue in a southeasterly direction on a true bearing of south 78 degrees east, to the southwesternmost point of land on the opposite, eastern shoreline and, all that area of the canal (said canal runs parallel to Quogo Neck Lane in Quogue) north and east of a line extending in a northwesterly direction on a true bearing of north 15 degrees west from the northernmost corner of bulkhead serving the Village of Quogue Recreation Area at the end of Quogo Neck Lane, Quogue to the southwestern point of land on the opposite northern shoreline.

(2) Aspatuck Creek. During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Aspatuck Creek and its tributary north of Main Street.

(3) Quantuck Creek. During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of the canal at the southeast corner of Quiogue point and, all that area lying north and west of a line extending northeasterly from the southernmost corner of bulkhead serving the residence at 30 Foster Lane in Westhampton Beach, to the southernmost corner of bulkhead serving the residence at 767 Montauk Highway in Westhampton Beach and, all that area of Quantuck Creek and its tributary north of Montauk Highway.

(c) Quogue Canal and Ogden Pond.

(1) Quogue Canal. During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all canals on the northern shoreline of Quogue Canal east of Quogo Neck Lane, Quogue and west of the Post Lane bascule bridge, Quogue.

(2) Ogden Pond. During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all of the area of the unnamed pond north of Quaquanatuck Lane in Quogue and its tributary leading into Ogden Pond.

(a) Except as otherwise described in this subparagraph, all creeks and canals located along the shoreline of Shinnecock Bay and Tiana Bay at Quogue, East Quogue, Pine Neck, West Tiana, Tiana, Springville and Ponquogue.

(b) All that area of Penniman Creek and tributaries lying northerly and westerly of a line extending northeasterly from the southeastern end of the dock serving the Shinnecock Yacht Club to the southwestern end of the dock located on the opposite eastern shoreline and serving the Brennan residence (1985) (local landmarks and local names).

(c) All that area of Stone Creek and tributaries lying northerly and westerly of a line extending northerly from the eastern end of the dock located on the southern shoreline at the mouth of Stone Creek and serving the residence, known locally as the "Anchorage" (1993) at 25 Bay Road, to the flagpole located at the residence, 19 Stone Lane (1993), located on the northern shoreline (local names and local landmarks).

(d) All that area of Phillips Creek and tributaries lying northerly and westerly of a line extending northeasterly from the flagpole located at 27 Old Point Road (1993) on the southern shoreline, to the flagpole at 28 Sunset Avenue located on the opposite northern shoreline (local names and local landmarks) (1993).

(e) All that area of Weesuck Creek and its tributaries lying northerly of a line extending northeasterly from the northeasternmost corner of the bulkheaded town pier and ramp at the foot of Bay Avenue, in East Quogue (local names and local landmarks) to the unnamed point of land on the western shore of Pine Neck, on a bearing 60 degrees magnetic (46 degrees true).

(f) All that area of Tiana Bay and tributaries lying northerly of a line extending easterly from the southernmost end of the bulkhead protecting the shoreline at the Siclari and Messina residence (1985), 39 West Tiana Road to the westernmost end of the sandspit extending from the opposite eastern shoreline (local names and local landmark).

(1) All that area of Tiana Bay within a 250 yard radius of the inlet to Carter Creek. The inlet to Carter Creek is located approximately 1,300 yards north of Pine Neck Point.

(2) Romana Creek. All that area of Romana Creek in its entirety and all that area of Tiana Bay lying within a 500-foot radius of the southernmost point of the bulkhead on the eastern shoreline of the inlet to Romana Creek.

(g) All that area of Smith Creek and tributaries lying northerly of a line extending easterly from the northeastern end of the white painted dock (located on the western shoreline of Smith Creek and serving the Bucci residence (21 East Point Lane) to the southern end of the Gilgan residence (1985) located on the opposite eastern shoreline on Oak Lane (local names and local landmarks).

(h) Heady Creek. During the period May 1 through November 30, both dates inclusive, all that area including tributaries of Heady Creek, lying north of a line extending due west from the southernmost tip of land on the southwesternmost point of Ruth Wales Dupont Sanctuary (said sanctuary is at the foot of Captain Neck Lane, Southampton) directly across to the opposite shoreline.

(i) Taylor Creek. During the period May 1 through November 30, both dates inclusive, all that area including tributaries of Taylor Creek lying northeast of a line extending southeasterly from the southernmost tip of land on the southwesternmost point of Ruth Wales Dupont Sanctuary (said sanctuary is at the foot of Captain Neck Lane, Southampton) to the northernmost corner of the chimney of the residence at 501 Meadow Lane, in the Village of Southampton.

(j) Southampton Yacht Club. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Old Fort Pond lying within a 65-yard radius from the junction of the bulkhead serving Southampton Yacht Club and the northern edge of gangway connecting the southern dock running west to east and serving said marina to the bulkhead.

(k) Best Boat Works Marina. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Old Fort Pond lying within a 75-yard radius from the junction of the northern edge of the dock connecting the shoreline of Best Boat Works marina, and the western edge of the westernmost dock running in a northern and southern direction and serving said marina.

(l) Club on the Bay Condominiums. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Old Fort Pond lying within a 65-yard radius from the southeasternmost corner of the northern building complex of the "Club on the Bay" Condominiums (local name).

(m) Shinnecock Commercial Fishing Dock. All that area of Shinnecock Bay bounded by a line extending northwesterly from the northwesternmost point of rock pile (said rock pile is adjacent to the westernmost corner of bulkhead serving the Shinnecock Bay Commercial Fishing Station, local name and local landmark) to Buoy "6" (Red nun) thence continuing northeasterly to the Lighted Buoy "4" Fl R 4 sec thence extending southwesterly to the northernmost corner of the western jetty of Shinnecock Inlet and, thence continuing along the shoreline westerly to the point of beginning.

(n) All that area of Daves Creek (East Quogue), lying within a 700 foot radius in all directions from the easternmost point of the fixed dock located at the residence at 69 Little Pine Lane (said residence is two-stories, half brick-half painted, with ornate white railings) and, all that area lying west of a line extending northerly from the easternmost point of land at Hampton Point (local name) to the foot of Walker Avenue, north of the inlet to Daves Creek.

(o) Far Pond. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Far Pond in its entirety and, all that area of Shinnecock Bay lying within a 275-yard radius from the northwestern corner of the foot of Far Pond Road in Southampton.

(a) During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area, including boat basins, marinas and all other tributaries, lying southerly of a line extending northeasterly from the northern tip of the western rock jetty to the northern tip of the eastern rock jetty (said jetties are located at the entrance to the Shinnecock Canal in Great Peconic Bay) and, all that area including boat basins and marinas and all other tributaries lying northerly of a line extending in a northeasterly direction from the northeastern corner of the chimney serving the residence of 27 Canoe Place Road, Hampton Bays, to the southeastern corner of the intersection of the wooden jetty and breakwater serving the marina at 6 Tepee Street, Hampton Bays (said jetty is running in a northwest to southeast direction from the southernmost point of land at said property).

(b) During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area north and west of a line extending northeasterly from the southeasternmost corner of property of the Shinnecock Bay Club on Canoe Place Road, Hampton Bays, to the southeastern corner of the dock at 15 Pawnee Street in Hampton Bays, thence continuing northerly along the eastern edge of said dock to the shoreline and, south of a line extending in a northeasterly direction from the northeastern corner of the chimney serving the residence of 27 Canoe Place Road in Hampton Bays, to the southeastern corner of the intersection of the wooden jetty and breakwater serving the marina at 6 Tepee Street in Hampton Bays (said jetty is running in a northwest to southeast direction from the southernmost point of land of said property).

(a) During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Mecox Bay, including tributaries, lying north and west of a line extending northeasterly from the southeasternmost corner of the residence at 97 Cobb Isle Road (said residence is a two-story, white painted house with two, second-story circular windows and two closely-spaced chimney flue pipes) to the southeastern end of Bay Lane, on the opposite eastern shoreline and all that area of Sam's Creek and Swan Creek, lying easterly of a line extending northerly from the northwest corner of the residence at 168 Dune Road (said residence is a two-story, flat roofed, white house with large ornamental, circular openings) to an orange marker located at the western entrance to Swan Creek and all that area of Burnett Creek, Channel Pond, and the unnamed creeks between Bay Lane and Swan Creek, along the northeastern shoreline of Mecox Bay.

(b) During the period May 1 through November 30, both dates inclusive, all that area of Mecox Bay lying south and east of a line extending northeasterly from the southeasternmost corner of the residence at 97 Cobb Isle Road (said residence is a two-story, white painted house with two, second-story circular windows and two closely-spaced chimney flue pipes) to the southeastern end of Bay Lane, on the opposite eastern shoreline.

(vi) Sebonac Creek Complex. During the period May 1 through November 30, both dates inclusive, all that area of the Sebonac Creek Complex and its tributaries, including Bullhead Bay, Little Sebonac Creek, West Cove Creek, and Scallop Pond.

(a) All that area, including tributaries, lying westerly of a line extending northwesterly along the breakwater located at the entrance to Sag Harbor (local landmark) and thence continuing northerly from the northern end of the breakwater to the northeasternmost extremity of the timber bulkhead protecting the shoreline adjacent to 28 East Harbor Drive, North Haven (local landmark) and easterly of the westernmost portions of the fixed bridge connecting North Haven Peninsula and Sag Harbor (local landmark).

(b) During the period May 15th through October 31st (both dates inclusive), all that area of Sag Harbor, Sag Harbor Cove and the Redwood Canal (local name), including tributaries, lying northerly of Redwood Road and southerly of a line extending easterly from the "wooden pole jetty" protecting the eastern side of the Redwood Boat Basin boat launching ramp to the northwestern end of the easternmost floating dock of the Ship- Ashore Marina (local names and local landmarks).

(c) During the period May 15th through October 31st (both dates inclusive) all that area of Sag Harbor Cove, including tributaries lying easterly of a line extending northeasterly from the eastern end of the Villas at Sag Harbor condominiums (local name and local landmark) to the southwestern end of the dock serving the P. Sutphen residence. (The Sutphen residence is a white painted house [1985] and is the first house on the west side of Ferry Road, North Haven, northerly of the fixed bridge connecting North Haven Peninsula and Sag Harbor, local names and local landmarks.)

(d) All that area of Paynes Creek, including tributaries, lying westerly of a line extending northerly from utility pole NYT 11 (said utility pole is the northernmost utility pole on the eastern side of Whitney Road, local name and local landmarks) to a wooden pole painted orange (located on the opposite northern shoreline, local landmark).

(e) All that area of Upper Sag Harbor Cove including tributaries lying south of a line extending easterly from the easternmost point of land at Bluff Point to the western end of the fixed wooden dock of the residence at 15 Greene Street, a one-story natural wood shingled home, located at the foot of and on the south side of Greene Street (local names, local landmarks).

(a) All waters of the Peconic River and its tributaries within the Town of Southampton.

(a) All that area of Reeves Bay, including tributaries.

(b) All that area of Flanders Bay, including tributaries, lying westerly and northerly of a line extending northeasterly from the northernmost tip of Goose Creek Point exposed at mean high water to the southernmost tip of Simmons Point exposed at mean high water.

(c) All that area, including tributaries of Goose Creek, Birch Creek and Mill Creek.

(d) During the period May 1 through November 30, both dates inclusive, all that area of Hubbard Creek including tributaries.

(e) All creeks, canals and other tributaries located along the northern shoreline of Flanders Bay between Simmons Point and Miamogue Point.

(a) Davis Creek and Turtle Cove.

(1) Davis Creek. During the period May 1 through November 30, both dates inclusive, all that area of Davis Creek lying east of a line extending northeasterly from the northwestern corner of the bulkhead at the residence of 308 Towd Point Road, Southampton, to the southwesternmost corner of the bulkhead at the residence of 336 Towd Point Road in Southampton and, all that area of Davis Creek lying west of the westernmost footbridge serving the residence at 40 Cedar Crest Road, Southampton.

(2) Davis Creek and Turtle Cove. During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Davis Creek lying east of the westernmost footbridge serving the residence at 40 Cedar Crest Road, Southampton and, all that area of Turtle Cove (local name).

*** (also see: North Sea Harbor/Fish Cove Conditional Program) Those portions of North Sea Harbor and Fish Cove, including tributaries, designated as conditional areas remain uncertified when there are no conditional programs in effect, and during any period when the conditional programs are in the "closed" status.

(b) North Sea Harbor, Alewife Creek, and Fish Cove.

(1) North Sea Harbor and Alewife Creek. During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Alewife Creek (local name) and North Sea Harbor lying south and west of a line extending southeasterly from the northeasternmost point of land at Conscience point, to the northeastern corner of the bulkhead at the residence of 317 Noyack Road, Southampton.

(2) North Sea Harbor and Fish Cove. During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Fish Cove and North Sea Harbor, including the unnamed creek connecting the two, lying east of a line extending northerly from the northeastern corner of the bulkhead at the residence of 317 Noyack Road, Southampton, to the southernmost point of land located at the residence of 102 Towd Point Road, Southampton on the opposite shoreline (said residence is a light-colored, two-story house with a stand of trees between the shoreline and the residence).

(xi) Wooley Pond. During the period May 1 through November 30, both dates inclusive, all that area of Wooley Pond and its tributaries.

(xii) Fresh Pond. All that area of Fresh Pond and its tributaries and all that area of Little Peconic Bay within 600 feet of the mouth of Fresh Pond.

(xiii) Mill Creek. During the period April 1 through December 14, both dates inclusive, all that area of Mill Creek. 'Special note:' Mill Creek is a tributary of Noyack Bay.

(xiv) Noyack Creek. During the period May 1 through November 30, both dates inclusive, all that area of Noyack Creek lying southerly of a line extending southwesterly on a bearing of south 80 degrees west from the southwesternmost point of land on Clam Island to the opposite shoreline located at Morton National Wildlife Refuge in Noyack.

(a) During the period May 1 through November 30, both dates inclusive, all that area of Cold Spring Pond within the former Lobster Inn Boat Basin (local names, local landmark), lying northwest of a line extending northeasterly along the fixed wooden dock of the former Lobster Inn Restaurant to the opposite shoreline, and all that area lying southeast of a line extending southwesterly from the northwesternmost point of land on the unnamed peninsula bordering the northeastern side of the cove, continuing southwesterly to the opposite shoreline (adjacent to the former Lobster Inn Restaurant).

(b) During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of the former Lobster Inn Boat Basin lying southeast of a line extending northeasterly along the fixed wooden dock of the former Lobster Inn Restaurant to the opposite shoreline.

(c) During the period May 1 through November 30, both dates inclusive, all that area of Cold Spring Pond lying northeast of a line extending southeasterly from a monument located on the northern shoreline in the northeastern corner of the pond to another monument located on the eastern shoreline adjacent to Shrubland Road.

(xvi) All that area of Sagaponack Pond, a brackish embayment and its tributaries, including any inlet when open to the Atlantic Ocean.

Note: All reference points in the town of Southampton are taken from N.O.A.A. Nautical Chart No. 12352, 36th Ed., May 2020 and/or No. 12358, 23rd Ed., Apr. 2019 and Light List Volume 1, 2020, except as indicated as local landmark or local name.

(5) Town of East Hampton.

(a) All that area, including tributaries, lying westerly of a line extending northwesterly along the breakwater located at the entrance to Sag Harbor (local landmark) and thence continuing northerly from the northern end of the breakwater to the northeasternmost extremity of the timber bulkhead protecting the shoreline adjacent to 28 East Harbor Drive, North Haven (local landmark) and easterly of the westernmost portions of the fixed bridge connecting North Haven Peninsula and Sag Harbor (local landmark).

(b) Sag Harbor. During the period May 1 through November 30 (both dates inclusive), all that area of outer Sag Harbor lying within a 250-yard radius in all directions from the northernmost point of the peaked roof of the residence located at 1 Harding Terrace, Sag Harbor (said residence is a two-story home with a single chimney and single peaked roof) and all that area of Little Northwest Creek (local landmark), including tributaries and mosquito ditches.

(a) All that area lying south of a line extending easterly from the flashing red light on the jetty on the western side of the entrance to Montauk Harbor (Lake Montauk) to the flashing green light on the jetty on the eastern side of the entrance to said harbor and all that area, including tributaries, northerly of the causeway to Star Island and a line extending easterly from the flag tower at the U.S. Coast Guard Station on Star Island to the southernmost extremity of the dock serving Deep Water Seafood, Inc. (local landmark) and located on the eastern shore of Montauk Harbor (Lake Montauk).

(b) During the period April 1st through December 14th (both dates inclusive), all that area of Montauk Lake and tributaries lying southerly of a line extending easterly from the highest point of the stone chimney (serving the Rispoli residence, 80 Old West Lake Drive) to the northwestern end of northernmost wooden jetty extending from the shoreline at Bridgeford Colony (local landmarks, local names).

(c) During the period May 1 through November 30 (both dates inclusive), all that area of Montauk Harbor (Montauk Lake) lying south of a line extending easterly from the flag tower at the U.S Coast Guard Station on Star Island to the southernmost extremity of the dock serving Deep Water Seafood, Inc. (local name, local landmark), on the western shore and northwest of a line extending northeasterly from the white flagpole located on the shoreline at 18 Star Island Road (local name), to a white flagpole at 395 East Lake Drive on the opposite shoreline (local landmark).

(d) During the period May 15th through October 15th (both dates inclusive), all that area of Montauk Harbor (Montauk Lake) at the Montauk Lake Marina & Club (local name, local landmark) lying east of a line extending southeasterly from a point 100 yards northwesterly of the main fixed dock to the southwesternmost end of that same fixed dock, continuing southeasterly along the fixed T-dock to its southeasternmost end and continuing in an easterly direction, 100 yards southeast of the innermost end of the floating T-dock.

(iii) Oyster Pond. All that area of Oyster Pond and tributaries.

(a) During the period May 1st through November 30th (both dates inclusive), all that area of Three Mile Harbor within a 500 foot radius in all directions of the entrance to the East Hampton Point Marina (located on the eastern shoreline at 295 Three Mile Harbor Road) and extending across the entrance into the Maidstone Harbor/Maidstone Marina Boat Basin, locally known as Duck Creek, located approximately 50 feet north of the East Hampton Point Marina.

(b) All that area of the Maidstone Harbor/Maidstone Marina Boat Basin, locally known as Duck Creek, lying east of a line extending northerly from the landward end of the northern wave break wall of the East Hampton Point Marina, including the entrance leading into the harbor.

(c) During the period from May 1st through November 30th (both dates inclusive), all that area of Three Mile Harbor within a 500 foot radius in all directions of the entrance to Shagwong Marina (local name), located on the eastern shoreline of Three Mile Harbor Road.

(d) During the period from May 1st through November 30th (both dates inclusive), all that area of Three Mile Harbor and tributaries lying southeast of a line extending northeasterly from the northeasternmost point of land on the peninsula located at the western side of the entrance into "Head of the Harbor" (local name), at the southern end of Three Mile Harbor and continuing to the western terminus of Breeze Hill Road, and lying north of a line extending northeasterly from the northernmost corner of the residence located at 5 South Pond Road on the western shoreline, to the northern side of the entrance of an unnamed creek on the opposite eastern shoreline (the entrance to this creek is located approximately 350 feet northwest of the entrance to Gardiner's Marina).

(e) All that area of "Head of the Harbor" (local name) at the southern end of Three Mile Harbor, lying south of a line extending northeasterly from the northernmost corner of the residence located at 5 South Pond Road on the western shoreline, to the northern side of entrance of an unnamed creek on the opposite eastern shoreline (the entrance to this creek is located approximately 350 feet northwest of the entrance to Gardiner's Marina).

(f) All that area of Hands Creek, including tributaries, lying west of a line extending northerly from an orange marker located on the southern side of the Hands Creek entrance channel to the opposite shoreline and, during the period May 1st through November 30th, both dates inclusive, all that area within a 500 foot radius in all directions of the entrance to Hands Creek.

(g) During the period May 15th through October 15th (both dates inclusive), all that area of Three Mile Harbor lying southeast of a line extending southwesterly from the northeasternmost point of land at the entrance of the cove harboring the Sunset Cove Marina (local name) to the opposite shoreline serving the inlet.

(h) During the period April 1 through November 30, both dates inclusive, all that area of Three Mile Harbor lying southerly of a line extending westerly from Harborview Lane (local name) and continuing to the opposite shoreline on Sedge Island (local name, local landmark) and easterly of a line extending northerly from the northwesternmost point of the bulkhead serving the Town of East Hampton, Town Dock (local name) and parking area, to the southernmost end of Sedge Island on the opposite shoreline.

(v) Gardiners Bay.

(1) During the period May 1st through November 30th (both dates inclusive), all that area of Hog Creek, including tributaries, lying easterly of a line extending southeasterly from the flagpole (located near the east side of the entrance to Hog Creek) on the property of the Clearwater Beach Property Owners Association, Inc. (local landmarks, local name) to the western end of the dock serving the residence at No. 152 Water Hole Road (local landmark, local name).

(2) During the period May 15th through October 15th (both dates inclusive), all that area of Hog Creek lying within the perimeter of the Lionhead Beach Association marina and within 35 feet of the bulkhead along the shoreline of the Lionhead Beach Association property. Said property is located at the easterly end of Bay Inlet Road (local names, local landmarks).

(3) All that area of Hog Creek lying south of a line extending easterly from the highest point of the white center peak of the residence located at 59 Isle of Wight Road to the red brick chimney on the north facing side of the residence located at 50 Fenmarsh Road on the opposite shoreline.

(4) During the period May 1st through November 30th (both dates inclusive), all that area of Hog Creek lying north of a line extending easterly from the highest point of the white center peak of the residence located at 59 Isle of Wight Road to the red brick chimney on the north facing side of the residence located at 50 Fenmarsh Road on the opposite shoreline, and lying south of a line extending easterly from the highest point of the center peak of the grey residence located at 99 Isle of Wight Road to the northerly corner of the whitish-grey, hexagon shaped residence located at 120 Fenmarsh Road on the opposite shoreline.

(b) Home Pond. All that area of Home Pond and all that area of Gardiners Bay within 100 yards in all directions from the mouth of the inlet to Home Pond.

(vi) Fresh Pond. All that area of Fresh Pond, including tributaries and the entrance "canal." Special Note: Fresh Pond is a tributary of Napeague Bay.

(vii) Napeague Bay. Devon Yacht Club. All that area of the Devon Yacht Club Boat Basin (local name), located on the southern side of Napeague Bay.

(a) Alewife Pond. All that area of Alewife Pond, including entrance channel and all that area of Northwest Harbor, within 300 yards in all directions from the inlet of Alewife Pond.

(b) During the period May 1st through December 14th, both dates inclusive, all that area of Northwest Harbor within a 200 yard radius from the western point of the spit of land on the southerly side of the entrance to the old Mile Hill Marina (local name), including the old Mile Hill Marina and the unnamed creek located immediately south of the old marina, which are all located southerly of Mile Hill Road.

(a) During the period January 1st through December 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Northwest Creek and its tributaries lying south of a line extending between two orange markers located approximately 750 yards south of the inlet into Northwest Creek.

(b) During the period May 1st through December 14th, both dates inclusive, all that area of Northwest Creek lying south of a line extending east from the northernmost tip of land, exposed at mean high water, on the western side of the inlet connecting the creek into Northwest Harbor to the opposite shoreline, and northerly of the line described in clause (a), of this subparagraph.

(c) In the absence of one or both painted markers, all of Northwest Creek is uncertified.

(x) Accabonac Harbor.

(a) All that area of East Harbor (located in the southernmost portion of Accabonac Harbor) lying south of a line extending northwesterly from the southernmost point of the southernmost bulkhead located on the property at 73 Louse Point Road, to a monument on the opposite western shoreline.

(b) During the period May 1 through November 30, both dates inclusive, all that area of Accabonac Harbor and East Harbor lying south of a line extending easterly from the northeasternmost point of land at the Merrill Lake Sanctuary to the westernmost point of land at Sage Island (local name) and continuing southeasterly along the northern shoreline of Sage Island (a monument is located at the northernmost point of said island) to its easternmost point, heading easterly to the foot of the dirt launch area at Gerard Point (local landmark) and all the area west of a line extending southerly from the southernmost point of land at Gerard Point (located at the northern side of the entrance of Accabonac Harbor) to the northernmost point of land at Louse Point (located at the southern side of the entrance to Accabonac Harbor).

(c) All that area of Accabonac Harbor, Pussy's Pond and an unnamed cove, including tributaries, lying west of a line heading north from a monument on the southern shore to a monument on the opposite northern shoreline. Said unnamed cove lies southerly of the Merrill Lake Sanctuary and northerly of Harbor Lane and Shipyard Lane (local landmarks in Springs).

(d) During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of the northernmost portion of Accabonac Harbor, including tributaries, lying north of a line extending westerly from the westernmost point of land of the property at 128 Gerard Drive to a monument on the opposite western shoreline.

(e) During the period May 1 through November 30, both dates inclusive, all that area of Accabonac Harbor lying west of a line extending southwesterly from the westernmost point of land of the property at 128 Gerard Drive to a monument located on the opposite western shoreline, and south of the line described in clause (d) of this subparagraph.

*** (also see: Accabonac Harbor and East Harbor Conditional Program) Those portions of Accabonac Harbor and East Harbor designated as conditional areas remain uncertified when there is no conditional program in effect, and during any period when the conditional program is in the "closed" status.

(xi) All that area of Georgica Pond, a brackish embayment and its tributaries, including any inlet when open to the Atlantic Ocean.

Note: All reference points, except local landmarks or local names, in the Town of East Hampton are taken from N.O.A.A. Nautical Charts No. 12358, 23rd Ed., Apr. 2019 and/or No. 13209, 28th Ed., Aug. 2017.

(6) Town of Shelter Island.

(i) Shelter Island Sound and Dering Harbor. All that area of Shelter Island Sound and Dering Harbor south and east of a line extending southwesterly from the westernmost point of land at Dering Point, Shelter Island to the southernmost point of land at Fanning Point, Southold and continuing southeasterly to the westernmost corner of the ferry dock at Shelter Island and all that area of Shelter Island Sound extending seaward 1,000 feet from mean high water from the ferry dock to a line extending westerly from the yellow house at 34 Prospect Avenue, Shelter Island to the foot of Island View Lane, Southold (local names, local landmarks).

(ii) Coecles Harbor. During the period May 15th through October 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Coecles Harbor lying south of a line extending easterly from the eastern end of Hudson Avenue (local name, local landmark) to the northeasternmost corner of the fueling dock at the Coecles Harbor Marina and Boatyard (local name, local landmark) and west of a line extending southerly along the easternmost side of said fueling dock and thence continuing to the southeasternmost corner of the southernmost floating dock at said marina and north of a line extending westerly along the southernmost side of said floating dock to the shoreline.

(iii) Menantic Creek. During the period May 15th through October 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Menantic Creek lying south of a line extending southeasterly from the northernmost corner of the shingled poolhouse immediately adjacent to the swimming pool located at the Island Boatyard Marina (local name, local landmark) to the western end of Tarkettle Road, which terminates in a town boat launching ramp (local name, local landmark), and north of a line extending southeasterly from the southernmost point of the Island Boatyard Marina fuel dock to the southwesternmost point of the wooden bulkhead on the eastern side of the mouth of Menantic Creek. Special Note: Menantic Creek is a tributary of West Neck Harbor.

Note: All reference points, except local names or local landmarks, in the Town of Shelter Island are taken from N.O.A.A. Nautical Chart Number 12358, 16th Ed., dated May 12, 1990.

(7) Town of Southold

(i) Long Island Sound. All that area lying within a one-half mile radius of the sewer outfall located at Lat. 41° 6' 30" N. and Long. 72° 23' 9" W. and serving the Greenport Sewage Treatment Plant. Such outfall is located 500 feet offshore of the westernmost rock jetty on the Village of Greenport property southwest of Inlet Point and approximately 500 feet easterly of the shoal marked "Parker Rock" on N.O.A.A. Nautical Chart No. 12358.

(a) All that area, including tributaries, lying northerly and westerly of a line extending northeasterly from the easternmost corner of the Long Island Railroad Dock (located at the Greenport Railroad Station, local names, local landmarks) to the southeasternmost corner of the "L" shaped dock at the foot of Carpenter Street then northeasterly to the southernmost point of the wavebreak at the wharf serving the Greenport Yacht and Shipbuilding Company (located at the southern foot of Carpenter Street, local names, local landmarks) and then northeasterly along the wavebreak to the southernmost corner of the wharf serving the Greenport Yacht and Shipbuilding Company then from the southeasternmost corner of the wharf serving the Greenport Yacht and Shipbuilding Company to the southernmost tip of the fixed dock at 202 Carpenter Street.

(b) All that area, including tributaries, lying northerly and westerly of a line extending northeasterly from the white painted flagpole (located at the eastern foot of Central Avenue on the property of the Stirling Cove Condominiums, local names, local landmarks) to the northwesternmost end of the wooden bulkhead protecting the shoreline at the eastern entrance of Stirling Basin off of Sandy Beach Lane, local names, local landmarks.

(a) Schoolhouse Creek. All that area of Schoolhouse Creek including all that area of Cutchogue Harbor within 100 yards in all directions of the easternmost point of the bulkheading on the south side of the entrance to Schoolhouse Creek.

(b) East Creek, Mud Creek, Haywater Cove, and Broadwater Cove.

(1) Broadwater Cove. During the period May 1 through October 31, all that area of Broadwater Cove lying west of a line extending southerly from the southeast corner of the house located at 8000 Skunk Lane (local name) to the opposite shore.

(2) East Creek. During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of East Creek lying north and west of a line extending northerly from the southeasternmost corner of the southernmost fixed dock on East Creek to the osprey nest platform on the opposite shoreline, then continuing northerly to the northernmost corner of the dock at 450 Strohson Road.

(3) Mud Creek. All that area of Mud Creek lying North of a line extending easterly from the northernmost corner of the dock at 450 Strohson Road to the northeasternmost corner of the dock at 470 Haywaters Drive.

(4) East Creek, Mud Creek and Haywater Cove. During the period of May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of East Creek, Mud Creek and the Haywater Cove complex bounded by a line extending southerly from the southwesternmost end of the boat ramp at the western end of Mason Drive to the intersection of Haywaters Road and Landing Road (local names), then continuing westerly along the shore to the southwesternmost point of land on the east side of the inlet to Haywater Cove, then continuing to the southeasternmost point of land on the west side of said inlet then along the shore to the southernmost fixed dock on East Creek, then extending northerly to the osprey nest platform on the opposite shoreline then continuing northerly to the northernmost corner of the dock at 450 Strohson Road, then continuing easterly to the northeasternmost corner of the dock at 470 Haywaters Drive, then southerly along the shore back to the point of beginning.

(5) Cutchogue Harbor. During the period of May 1 through October 31, all that area of Cutchogue Harbor within 500 feet in all directions of the mouth of the Inlet to the Haywater Cove Complex (local name).

(c) Wickham Creek. During the period of May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Wickham Creek and its tributaries.

(1) During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area within the confines of the stone breakwater protecting the marina located at 650 1st Street, New Suffolk, and all that area of Cutchogue Harbor within 150 yards of the southernmost point of the breakwater on the northern side of the marina basin entrance.

(2) During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area within the boat basin at the New Suffolk boat ramp and all that area of Cutchogue Harbor within 75 yards of the eastern tip of the north jetty at the entrance to the boat basin.

(a) During the period May 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive all that area north of a line extending easterly from an orange marker near the red shack on the south side of the entrance to Howards Creek (local landmark), to an orange marker near the flagpole serving the residence at 1085 West View Drive (local landmark), and the area of Howards Creek lying easterly of a line extending northwesterly from an orange marker near the dock serving the residence at 1175 Point Pleasant Road to an orange marker near the dock serving the residence located on Fox Hollow Road on the opposite shore.

(b) All that area south of a line extending easterly from an orange marker near the red shack on the south side of the entrance to Howards Creek (local landmark), to an orange marker near the flagpole serving the residence at 1085 West View Drive (local landmark), and the area of Howards Creek lying west of a line extending northwesterly from an orange marker near the dock serving the residence at 1175 Point Pleasant Road to an orange marker near the dock serving the residence located on Fox Hollow Road on the opposite shore.

(a) All that area of Shelter Island Sound and Dering Harbor south and east of a line extending southwesterly from the westernmost point of land at Dering Point, Shelter Island to the southernmost point of land at Fanning Point, Southold and continuing southeasterly to the westernmost corner of the ferry dock at Shelter Island and all that area of Shelter Island Sound extending seaward 1,000 feet from mean high water from the ferry dock to a line extending westerly from the yellow house at 34 Prospect Avenue, Shelter Island to the foot of Island View Lane, Southold (local names, local landmarks).

(b) Sage Pond. During the period May 15th through October 31st, all that area within Sage Pond (local name) and all tributaries.

(c) Budds Pond and Mill Creek. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Budds Pond (local name) including tributaries in their entirety, lying north and west of a line extending northeasterly from the northeasternmost point of land 230 feet north of the northeastern corner of the eastern road end of Willow Point Road to the westernmost point of land on the barrier island, continuing easterly along the north shore of the barrier island, then from the northeasternmost point of land of the barrier island to the stack (brick chimney) east of the entrance to Mill Creek and south of Goldsmith's Boat Shop (local names, local landmark), and all that area of Mill Creek, including its tributaries in their entirety, lying south and west of the north side of the State Route 25 bridge over Mill Creek.

(d) During the period May 15th through October 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area within the Goldsmith Boat Shop boat basin and all that area within the Mill Creek Inn Restaurant and Marina boat basin (local names, local landmarks).

(a) West Harbor and Pirates Cove. During the period May 1 through September 30, both dates inclusive, all that area of West Harbor and Pirates Cove lying southerly of a line extending southeasterly from the easternmost point of land at Hawks Nest Point to a flagpole located on the eastern shore of West Harbor on the property of Grey Gulls Estate, also known as the DuPont House (local name, local landmark). Said flagpole is situated between the shoreline and the residence.

(b) Island Pond. All the area of Island Pond and tributaries.

Note: All reference points, except local names and local landmarks, on Fishers Island in the Town of Southold are taken from N.O.A.A. Nautical Chart No. 13214, 30th Ed., dated May 8, 2020.

(a) During the period January 1 through December 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Hashamomuck Pond and Long Creek lying westerly of a line extending southerly from the orange marker located on the shore at the Terrace Garden Colony Cottages to the northernmost corner of the residence at 645 Mill Creek Drive and lying southerly of the line extending easterly from the orange marker located on the shoreline of the residence at 1645 Mill Creek Drive to the orange marker on the opposite shore.

(b) During the period May 1 through November 30, both dates, inclusive, all that area of Hashamomuck Pond and Mill Creek, including tributaries, lying northerly and easterly of the north side of the State Route 25 bridge over Mill Creek.

(c) During the period January 1st to December 31st, all that area of the "The Clay Pit" and its tributaries lying east of a marker approximately 540 feet east of the LIRR trestle over Mill Creek (local names, local landmarks).

(viii) Goldsmith Inlet. All that area of Goldsmith Inlet and tributaries.

(a) All that area of Gull Pond lying northwest of a line extending southerly from the southernmost point of the bulkhead located at 706 Wiggins Lane, to the opposite shoreline (1625 Gull Pond Lane).

(b) During the period April 1st through December 14th, both dates inclusive, all that area of Gull Pond, including tributaries lying north and northwest of a line extending northeasterly from the southeastern end of the wood bulkheaded jetty protecting the southwestern side of the entrance to Gull Pond to the southeastern end of the wood bulkheaded jetty protecting the northeastern side of the entrance to Gull Pond (local landmarks).

(a) Plum Gut. All that area of Plum Gut, Plum Gut Harbor and tributaries lying northerly and easterly of a line extending westerly from the southernmost point of land exposed at mean high water at Pine Point to buoy GR "MS" (said buoy is located near Midway Shoal) and thence continuing northerly to F12.5 sec 5M PA.

(b) Long Island Sound. All that area of Long Island Sound within 500 yards of the most seaward portion of the shoreline exposed at mean high water, from the westernmost point of land on Plum Island to the easternmost point of land on Plum Island.

(c) Gardiners Bay. All that area of Gardiners Bay adjacent to the southern shore of Plum Island, including tributaries, within 500 yards of the most seaward portion of shoreline exposed at mean high water, from the westernmost point of land on Plum Island to the easternmost point of land on Plum Island.

(a) All that area of Brushs Creek, including tributaries and the entrance canal, and all that area of Great Peconic Bay within a 1,000-yard radius of the southwesternmost corner of the bulkheading protecting the northern shoreline of the entrance to Brushs Creek.

(b) During the period May 1 through November 30, both dates inclusive, all that area of James Creek, including tributaries and all that area of Great Peconic Bay within 350 yards in all directions of the easternmost bulkhead corner on the western shore of the entrance to James Creek.

(c) During the period May 1st through November 30th, both dates inclusive, all the area of Deep Hole Creek, and all that area of Great Peconic Bay within 500 yards in all directions of the northernmost tip of Marratooka Point (local name).

(d) During the period May 1st through November 30th, both dates inclusive, all that area of Halls Creek, including tributaries.

(e) Downs Creek. All that area of Downs Creek and its tributaries.

(f) West Creek. All that area of West Creek, and its tributaries and all that area of Great Peconic Bay within 750 feet in all directions of the southernmost point of the jetty on the east side of the mouth of West Creek.

(1) During the period May 15th through October 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of the Paradise Point Boat Basin and all that area of the combined Reydon Shores and the Plock property boat basin (local names).

(2) All that area of the boat basin north and west of Harbor Lights Drive and all that area of Southold Bay within 250 feet of the mouth the boat basin.

(b) Jockey Creek and Town Creek.

(1) During the period January 1st to December 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Jockey Creek lying westerly of a line extending southerly from the highest point of the chimney on the residence at 3415 Wells Avenue to the white flagpole with the sailboat ornament, between the shoreline and the residence at 405 Pine Creek Road (local names, local landmarks).

(2) During the period May 1st through November 30th, both dates inclusive, all that area of Jockey Creek, Town Creek and tributaries lying west of a line extending southerly from the south end of Terry Road directly to the opposite shore.

(c) Petty's Pond. All that area of Petty's Pond (also known as Beixedon Creek) and all that area of Southold Bay within 500 feet of the mouth of Petty's Pond (local names).

(d) Goose Creek. During the period May 1 through November 30, both dates inclusive, all that area of Goose Creek lying south and west of the Goose Creek Bridge (local Landmarks).

(a) Oyster Ponds Creek. During the period May 1st through October 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Orient Harbor and its tributaries lying north and east of the fixed dock at Orient Yacht Club and then east of a line extending northerly from the northwestern corner of the northwestern most dock of the Orient Yacht Club to the highest peak on the front of the residence with a crescent shaped window at 20075 Main Road, to a point on the opposite shore of Orient Harbor 275 yards northwest of the northernmost corner of the bulkhead at the foot of Harbor River Road and all that area of Oyster Ponds Creek in its entirety.

(b) Narrow River. All that area of Narrow River and tributaries lying north of a line extending east from the southern end of the seawall located on the western shore of Narrow River near the junction of Narrow River Road and King Street (local names) to a pole with an osprey nesting platform on top located on the southern tip of Barnsfield Point.

(c) Spring Pond. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Spring Pond including tributaries, and all that area of Orient Harbor within 500 feet in all directions of the southeastern end of the easternmost bulkhead at the entrance to Spring Pond.

(a) Orient by the Sea Boat Basin. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of the Orient by the Sea boat basin and all that area of Gardiners Bay within 200 feet of the southernmost corner of the western bulkhead at the entrance to the Orient by the Sea boat basin.

(a) Richmond Creek. During the period May 1 through October 31, both dates inclusive, all that area of Richmond Creek lying west of a line extending north from the easternmost point of land at the south side of the mouth of Richmond Creek to the opposite shore.

(b) Corey Creek. All that area of Corey Creek lying north and west of a line extending northeasterly from the northernmost corner of the bulkhead at 2950 Minnehaha Boulevard to the southernmost tip of the rock revetment at 723 Windy Pont Lane.

(xvi) Pipes Cove. All that area of the unnamed creek northwest of Fanning Point and east of Silvermere Road, Southold, and all that area of Pipes Cove within 100 feet of the southernmost point of the eastern bulkhead within the mouth of the unnamed creek.

Note: All reference points, except local names or local landmarks, in the Town of Southold, with the exception of Fishers Island Sound, are taken from N.O.A.A. Nautical Chart No. 12358, 23rd Ed., dated April 17, 2019.

(8) Town of Riverhead.

(a) All that area of Reeves Bay, including tributaries.

(b) All that area of Flanders Bay, including tributaries, lying westerly and northerly of a line extending northeasterly from the northernmost tip of Goose Creek Point exposed at mean high water to the southernmost tip of Simmons Point exposed at mean high water.

(c) All that area, including tributaries, of Goose Creek, Birch Creek and Mill Creek.

(d) During the period May 1st through November 30th, both dates inclusive, all that area of Hubbard Creek including tributaries

(e) All creeks, canals and other tributaries located along the northern shoreline of Flanders Bay between Simmons Point and Miamogue Point.

(ii) Peconic River. All waters of the Peconic River and its tributaries within the Town of Riverhead.

(a) East Creek. All that area of the East Creek boat basin and its tributaries.

(b) All that area of Brushs Creek, including tributaries and the entrance canal, and all that area of Great Peconic Bay within a 1,000 yard radius of the southwesternmost corner of the bulkheading protecting the northern shoreline of the entrance to Brushs Creek.

(a) All that area of Long Island Sound within 500 yards of the shoreline, beginning at a point 200 yards west of the westernmost point of the west jetty at the Shoreham Canal to the westernmost point of the bulkhead located at 158 North Side Road (Hamlet of Wading River).

(b) All that area of Long Island Sound within 300 yards of the entrance to Baiting Hollow Creek.

(v) Wading River Creek. All that area of Wading River Creek and its tributaries.

(vi) Baiting Hollow Creek. All that area of Baiting Hollow Creek and its tributaries.

Note: All reference points, except local landmarks and local names, in the Peconic River, Reeves Bay, Flanders Bay, Great Peconic Bay and tributaries are taken from N.O.A.A. Nautical Chart No. 12358, 14th Ed., dated July 10, 1982.

(9) Town of Brookhaven (North Shore).

(a) During the period January 1st through December 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Port Jefferson Harbor, including tributaries, lying east and south of a line extending northerly from the flagpole located at the foot of Washington Street, Poquott, to the channel marker buoy G "5" Fl G 4s BELL, and thence continuing northeasterly to the landwardmost point of the rock ruins located at the foot of Anchorage Road, Belle Terre (local names, local landmarks).

*** (also see: Port Jefferson Harbor Conditional Program) That portion of Port Jefferson Harbor designated as a conditional area remains uncertified when there is no conditional program in effect, and during any period when the conditional program is in the "closed" status.

(b) During the period January 1st through December 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Conscience Bay, including tributaries, lying south of a line extending northeasterly from utility pole "NYT 183" (with transformer), located across Old Field Road from the residence located at #92 Old Field Road (local landmark), to the top of the white chimney of the residence located at 22 Conscience Circle, Strong's Neck (local landmark, said residence is a gray, two-story house).

(c) During the period May 1st through October 31st, both dates inclusive all that area of Port Jefferson Harbor and Setauket Harbor, including tributaries, lying southerly and westerly of a line extending easterly from the northernmost chimney of the residence at 10 Preston Lane, Strong's Neck, (said residence is a two story house protected by a seawall) to channel marker buoy G "5" FI G 4s BELL and thence continuing southeasterly to the flagpole located at the foot of Washington Street (Village of Poquott).

(d) During the period May 1st through October 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Port Jefferson Harbor, the Narrows and Conscience Bay, including tributaries, lying westerly of a line extending due north from the northeasternmost corner of the gray slate chimney located on the residence at #11 Indian Field Road, Strong's Neck (said residence is a red brick and gray slate structure located on property that is protected by a stone seawall) to a point on the harbor side of the Old Field Beach peninsula (local names, local landmarks).

(e) During the period January 1st through December 31st, both dates inclusive: all that area of Setauket Harbor, including Little Bay and all other tributaries, lying south and west of a line extending westerly from utility pole "NYT #29," located near the shoreline adjacent to Van Brunt Manor Road at Poquott, to the highest point of the turret of the residence at 18 John's Road at Strong's Neck, on the opposite shoreline.

(ii) During the period January 1st through December 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Flax Pond, including tributaries, lying southerly of a line extending easterly from the northernmost point of the western jetty to the northernmost point of the eastern jetty at the inlet.

(a) During the period May 1st through October 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Mount Sinai Harbor, including tributaries, lying southerly of a line extending easterly from the northernmost point of the west jetty at the harbor entrance to the northernmost point of the east jetty at the harbor entrance.

(b) During the period January 1st through December 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Mount Sinai Harbor, including tributaries lying south of a line extending westerly from the northernmost point of the bulkhead at the Town of Brookhaven access point known locally as Satterly Landing (located on the northern side of Shore Road and west of the residence at 182 Shore Road, local landmarks) to the northernmost end of the small white building known locally as "Adee's Boathouse" (local landmark), located on the opposite western shoreline.

(a) During the period of May 1st through October 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Smithtown Bay located within 1,000 yards of the landward end of the northernmost rock jetty on the eastern side of the entrance to Stony Brook Harbor.

(b) During the period May 1st through October 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of the entrance to Stony Brook Harbor and the Stony Brook Boat Channel lying south of a line extending westerly from the landward end of the northernmost rock jetty on the eastern shore of the entrance to Stony Brook Harbor to the northeasternmost point of land on Long Beach on the western shore of the entrance to Stony Brook Harbor and east of a line extending southerly from the northeasternmost point of land on Long Beach to the northeastern tip of the dredge spoil island known as Youngs Island (local name) separating the Stony Brook Boat Channel and Porpoise Channel and continuing along the high tide line of the southern shore of Youngs Island to the orange marker located northwest of the entrance to Stony Brook Creek and extending southeasterly to the southwestern corner of the two-story residence located at 15 Emmet Drive located on the opposite shore in the incorporated Village of Head of the Harbor, west of Stony Brook Creek.

(c) All that area of Stony Brook Creek (local name) and tributaries lying south and east of a line extending northerly from the northwesternmost corner of the two story residence at 15 Emmet Drive (said residence is a beige, two-story house with five large brick chimneys) to the landwardmost end of the southernmost fixed dock at Stony Brook Boat Works (located on the western side of Shore Road, Stony Brook, local landmarks).

(d) All that area of Stony Brook Harbor and tributaries lying south of a line extending southeasterly from the easternmost point of the ridgeline of the white house on the western shoreline located at 30 Smith Lane (Village of Nissequogue, local landmark) to the southwesternmost corner of the staircase used for beach access serving the residence at 2 Arbor Lane (Village of Head of the Harbor, local landmark) on the eastern shoreline.

(e) During the period May 1st through December 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Stony Brook Harbor and tributaries lying south of a line extending southeasterly from the southernmost red brick chimney on the Knox School located at 541 Long Beach Road in the incorporated Village of Nissequogue (said school is a three-story red brick building, local landmark) to the southernmost chimney on the residence at 121 Harbor Road in the incorporated Village of Head of the Harbor (said residence is a white three-story structure with dark shutters and three chimneys and is located on the Thatch Meadow Farm property, local landmark).

(f) All that area of West Meadow Creek and tributaries lying north of a line extending easterly from the southernmost tip of West Meadow Beach exposed at mean high water to the southernmost corner of the wooden bulkhead along the shoreline of West Meadow Creek and on the property at 21 Shore Oaks Drive, Stony Brook (local landmarks).

(g) During the period May 15th through October 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of the Town of Smithtown Marina (local name) or boat basin and the entrance channel, which serves to connect said marina with Porpoise Channel (local name).

(h) All that area of the unnamed tidal pond and creek located on the western shore of Stony Brook Harbor at the Nissequogue Golf Club, and all that area of Stony Brook Harbor within a 100 yard radius of the inlet to said tidal pond and creek.

(i) All that area of the unnamed tidal inlet located on the eastern shore of Stony Brook Harbor between Piper Lane and Arbor Lane and all that area of Stony Brook Harbor within a 150 yard radius of the entrance to said inlet.

(v) Wading River Creek. All that area of Wading River Creek and its tributaries.

(a) All that area of Long Island Sound within 500 yards of the shoreline, beginning at a point 200 yards west of the westernmost point of the west jetty at the Shoreham Canal to the westernmost point of the bulkhead located at 158 North Side Road (Hamlet of Wading River).

(b) All that area of the canal serving the former Long Island Lighting Company facility at Shoreham lying south of a line drawn between the northernmost tips of the two rock jetties serving said canal (local landmarks).

Note: All reference points in the Town of Brookhaven (North Shore) are taken from N.O.A.A. Nautical Charts No. 12362, 14th Edition, dated April 8, 1978 and/or No. 12364, 22nd Edition, dated November 13, 1982, except Wading River and the southern portion of Stony Brook Harbor and where indicated as local name or local landmark.

(10) Town of Smithtown.

(a) All that area of Smithtown Bay, including the Nissequogue River and its tributaries and Sunken Meadow Creek, lying south of a line extending northeasterly from the northernmost point of the ridgeline of the west bathhouse at Sunken Meadow State Park (local landmark) to the Nissequogue River Entrance Lighted Buoy "NR" (located at 40° 55' 23.352" N latitude and 073° 13' 45.407" W longitude), approximately one mile north of the mouth of the Nissequogue River, thence southeasterly to the northeasternmost corner of the bulkhead protecting the Nissequogue Point Beach Club (located at 703 Short Beach Road, St. James, local name, local landmark).

(b) All that area within a one-half mile radius of the Nissequogue River Entrance Lighted Buoy "NR" (located at 40° 55' 23.352" N latitude and 073° 13' 45.407" W longitude), approximately one mile north of the mouth of the Nissequogue River.

(c) Fresh Pond. All that area of Fresh Pond and its tributaries in their entirety.

(d) Crab Meadow Creek. All that area of Crab Meadow Creek in its entirety and all that area of Smithtown Bay located within 300-yards of the northernmost point of the rock jetty along the western bank of the mouth of Crab Meadow Creek.

(e) Northport Basin. All that area of Northport Basin and the canal serving the Northport Powerplant (local name, local landmark) and all that area of Smithtown Bay within 700-yards of the northernmost tip of the rock jetty on the east side of Northport Basin.

(f) During the period of May 1st through October 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Smithtown Bay located within 1,000 yards of the landward end of the northernmost rock jetty on the eastern side of the entrance to Stony Brook Harbor.

(a) During the period May 1st through October 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of the entrance to Stony Brook Harbor and the Stony Brook Boat Channel lying south of a line extending westerly from the landward end of the northernmost rock jetty on the eastern shore of the entrance to Stony Brook Harbor to the northeasternmost point of land on Long Beach on the western shore of the entrance to Stony Brook Harbor and east of a line extending southerly from the northeasternmost point of land on Long Beach to the northern tip of the dredge spoil island known as Youngs Island (local name) separating the Stony Brook Boat Channel and Porpoise Channel and continuing along the high tide line of the southern shore of Youngs Island to the orange marker located northwest of the entrance to Stony Brook Creek and extending southeasterly to the southwestern corner of the two story residence located at 15 Emmet Drive located on the opposite shore in the incorporated Village of Head of the Harbor, west of Stony Brook Creek.

(b) All that area of Stony Brook Creek (local name) and tributaries lying south and east of a line extending northerly from the northwesternmost corner of the two story residence at 15 Emmet Drive (said residence is a beige two story house with five large brick chimneys) to the landwardmost end of the southernmost fixed dock at Stony Brook Boat Works (located on the western side of Shore Road, Stony Brook, local landmarks).

(c) All that area of Stony Brook Harbor and tributaries lying southerly of a line extending southeasterly from the easternmost point of the ridgeline of the white house on the western shoreline located at 30 Smith Lane (Village of Nissequogue, local landmark) to the southwesternmost corner of the staircase used for beach access serving the residence at 2 Arbor Lane (Village of Head of the Harbor, local landmark) on the eastern shoreline.

(d) During the period May 1st through December 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Stony Brook Harbor and tributaries lying south of a line extending southeasterly from the southernmost red brick chimney on the Knox School located at 541 Long Beach Road in the incorporated Village of Nissequogue (said school is a three-story red brick building, local landmark) to the southernmost chimney on the residence at 121 Harbor Road in the incorporated Village of Head of the Harbor (said residence is a white three- story structure with dark shutters and three chimneys and is located on the Thatch Meadow Farm property, local landmark).

(e) All that area of West Meadow Creek and tributaries lying north of a line extending easterly from the southernmost tip of West Meadow Beach exposed at mean high water to the southernmost corner of the wooden bulkhead along the shoreline of West Meadow Creek on the property at 21 Shore Oaks Drive, Stony Brook (local landmark).

(f) During the period May 15th through October 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of the Town of Smithtown Marina (local name) or boat basin and the entrance channel, which serves to connect said marina with Porpoise Channel (local name).

(g) All that area of the unnamed tidal pond and creek located on the western shore of Stony Brook Harbor at the Nissequogue Golf Club and all that area of Stony Brook Harbor within a 100 yard radius of the inlet to said tidal pond and creek.

(h) All that area of the unnamed tidal inlet located on the eastern shore of Stony Brook Harbor between Piper Lane and Arbor Lane and all that area of Stony Brook Harbor within a 150 yard radius of the entrance to said inlet.

Note: All reference points in the Town of Smithtown are taken from N.O.A.A. Nautical Chart No. 12364, 41st Edition, April 2020, and U.S.C.G. Light List Volume 1, 2020 except the southern portion of Stony Brook Harbor and where indicated as local name or local landmark.

(11) Town of Huntington.

*** See the image of the "The Sand Hole" for additional information on Mooring Area closures in "The Sand Hole" or visit our Recent Changes page.

(a) All that area of Northport Bay, Northport Harbor and tributaries lying southerly of a line extending northeasterly from the highest point of the green domed cupola of the residence located at 24 Mariner Court, Centerport, on the northeastern shore of Little Neck Point, to the highest point of the gazebo located between the shoreline and the residence at 8 Hawkins Drive, Northport (local names, local landmarks), located near the eastern shore of Northport Bay.

(b) During the period May 1st through October 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Price Bend (local name) lying northerly of a line extending easterly from the easternmost end of the chain link fence, located adjacent to the southern end of the paved parking area at the Town of Huntington Hobart Beach (local names, local landmarks), to the northwesternmost corner of the concrete seawall adjacent to the shoreline and protecting the property and residence (with vertical wooden siding) at 120 Winkle Point Road, Eatons Neck (local names, local landmarks).

(a) During the period January 1st through December 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Centerport Harbor, including tributaries, lying southerly of a line extending northeasterly from the easternmost point of the fixed dock serving the Huntington Beach Community Association (HBCA) to the southwesternmost corner of the barn-like structure known as the Windsurfing Center at the Town of Huntington Centerport Beach (local names, local landmarks). The HBCA dock is located on the western shore of the harbor, approximately 85 feet northerly of the boat launching ramp at the foot of Adams Street, Centerport.

(b) During the period May 1st through October 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Centerport Harbor, including tributaries, lying southerly of a line extending easterly from the southernmost end of the white-painted garage with red-colored shingled roof (located near the western shoreline of Centerport Harbor on the property at 76 Knollwood Road, local names and local landmarks) to the gazebo with sailboat weather vane (located on the hillside near the eastern shoreline of Centerport Harbor on the property at 247 Little Neck Road, local names and local landmarks) and northerly of the line described in clause (a) of this subparagraph.

(iii) Huntington Harbor. All that area, including tributaries, lying southerly, westerly and easterly of a line extending easterly from the northeasternmost end of the sea wall protecting the western entrance to Huntington Harbor to the northernmost end of the rock and concrete rubble bulkhead-jetty protecting the eastern entrance to Huntington Harbor, local landmark.

(a) During the period January 1st through December 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area including tributaries south and east of a line extending southerly from the seaward end of the dock serving the Cold Spring Harbor Beach Club (local landmark) to the western extremity of the white house (known as the Gale House) located on the shoreline immediately west of Cold Spring Beach (local landmark), on the campus of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.

(b) During the period May 1st through October 15th, both dates inclusive, all that area including tributaries south and east of a line extending westerly from the seaward end of the dock serving the Cold Spring Harbor Beach Club (local landmark) to the flag pole situated near the village hall of the Village of Laurel Hollow, 1492 Laurel Hollow Road (local landmark).

(c) During the period May 1st through October 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Eel Creek (local name) located at the Sagamore Hill National Historic Site and all that area within 250 yards in any direction of the southeastern corner of the bulkheading surrounding the stand of trees on the northern side of the entrance to the boat basin located immediately south of the Sagamore Hill National Historic Site.

(a) Fresh Pond. All that area of Fresh Pond.

(b) Crab Meadow Creek. All that area of Crab Meadow Creek in its entirety and all that area of Smithtown Bay located within 300-yards of the northernmost point of the rock jetty along the western bank of the mouth of Crab Meadow Creek.

(c) Northport Basin. All that area of Northport Basin and the canal serving the Northport Powerplant (local name, local landmark) and all that area of Smithtown Bay within 700-yards of the northernmost tip of the rock jetty on the east side of Northport Basin.

(a) All that area of Lloyd Harbor and Huntington Bay lying south and within the boundaries of a line extending northeasterly from the northernmost point of the concrete seawall protecting the shoreline of the property at One Lighthouse Point, Village of Lloyd Harbor (the residence on said property is a large, two-story brick structure with four twin-vented chimneys and is the second residence lying east of the northern terminus of Southdown Road local names and local landmarks), to the highest point of the Lloyd Harbor Horn and continuing southeasterly to the western side of the blue, three story residence located at One Salty Way on the southern shoreline of Huntington Bay, approximately 200 yards east of the entrance to Huntington Harbor.

(b) During the period May 1st through October 31st, both dates inclusive, all that area of Lloyd Harbor lying west of a line extending southerly from the southernmost point of land, lying south of Lloyd Harbor Road and west of the intersection of Lloyd Harbor Road and Fiddlers Green Drive on the Lloyd Neck shoreline, to the western side of the Mill Pond Association paved parking area located at the end of School Lane on the opposite shore on West Neck (local names, local landmarks).

(vii) Steers Canal (local name). All that area of Steers Canal (local name) and tributaries. Special note: Steers Canal is a tributary of Northport Bay and is located at the southern shore of said bay approximately 350 yards easterly of the eastern entrance to Northport Harbor.

Note: All reference points, except local landmarks or local names in the Town of Huntington are taken from N.O.A.A. Nautical Chart No. 12364, 25th Ed., dated January 10, 1987 and/or No. 12365, 19th Ed., dated March 10, 1984.

§41.4 Emergency closing of shellfish lands

(a) Where the commissioner, or the regional director of the Department of Environmental Conservation within whose region such shellfish lands are located, determines that a condition in an area certified for the taking of shellfish under this Part constitutes as imminent danger to the health of the people of the State, the commissioner may designate such areas as uncertified for a period not to exceed seven days exclusive of the day in which such designation is made. The commissioner or such regional director may rescind such designation prior to the expiration of the seven days.

(b) The commissioner or regional director making a designation or rescission pursuant to subdivision (a) of this section shall give such publicity to such designation or rescission as they reasonably determine would give reasonable notice to interested parties in the affected areas.

§41.5 Temporarily uncertified shellfish lands

The shellfish lands described in this section have not been subject to complete examinations to determine the sanitary condition thereof and are hereby designated as uncertified areas.


Shellfish Recall in Long Island Sound - Recipes

Eutrophication is the overabundance of nutrients in a body of water that results in harmful algal blooms, fish kills, and in some cases ecosystem collapse. We are investigating the feasibility of using shellfish to filter out excessive nutrients in the Piscataqua estuary. Using models, field data, and input from stakeholders, we are evaluating aquaculture success, water-quality improvement, economic benefits, and the potential credit for carbon and nitrogen trading as a management strategy.

Why We Care
Eutrophication is among the most serious threats to the function and services supported by coastal ecosystems. Attempts to reverse coastal eutrophication have centered on reducing land-based sources of nutrients, such as fertilizer applications and wastewater treatment plant discharges. However, recent studies have shown that in-the-water removal of nutrients through filtration and growth of shellfish can complement land-based management methods, provide much-needed shellfish products (the United States presently imports more than 90 percent of seafood consumed), and create additional jobs and income for aquaculture farmers.

What We Are Doing
Bivalve shellfish planted in aquaculture farms improve water quality by filtering out nutrients, suspended sediment, and chlorophyll. With support from the EPA Regional Ecosystem Services Program, we are studying the nutrient removal potential of cultivated and harvested shellfish, focusing on the eastern oyster and the northern quahog. We are also estimating the value of the ecosystem functions and services maintained or enhanced via aquaculture.

The potential costs, ecosystem service benefits, and broader applicability of innovative management strategies, such as the use of shellfish aquaculture as a nutrient management measure, are being evaluated in the specific context of two regional ecosystem restoration programs: Long Island Sound (Connecticut and New York) and the Great Bay/Piscataqua region (New Hampshire and southern Maine). The two locations differ in nutrient loading, water circulation, and susceptibility to eutrophication but are both areas of active ecosystem restoration efforts.

We are using four models: System Wide Eutrophication Management (SWEM) model, Farm Aquaculture Resource Management (FARM) model, Assessment of Estuarine Trophic Status (ASSETS) model, and an economic model called INPLAN. We are evaluating the success of aquaculture (growth of shellfish), the impact of the farm on water quality (changes in chlorophyll and dissolved oxygen related to aquaculture activity), the potential economic benefit of the water cleaning service provided by the shellfish, and the credit potential for trading carbon and nitrogen in a water quality trading program.

Benefits of Our Work
The removal of phytoplankton and detritus/particulate material through filtration by oysters and clams, and the subsequent increase in water clarity allows seagrasses, and thus fish habitat, to re-establish in high-turbidity systems. Nutrients are essentially removed from the system when the shellfish are harvested. A farmer can receive credit for the avoided cost of additional water treatment by traditional measures. This project will both support regional nutrient water-quality management programs and provide tools for broader application nationally. Additionally, it could stimulate seafood production and create jobs through the expansion of aquaculture activities.

Next Steps
We are hoping that the approach used in this study may be used to investigate the potential benefits of shellfish aquaculture in other coastal waterbodies that can potentially support aquaculture.


Growing culture: Oyster farming's resurgence on Long Island

Sue Wicks played basketball for Rutgers and the Liberty, set multiple records, appeared in several championship games and eventually was inducted into the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame. On Nov. 3, Wicks talked about her current passion: She owns and operate Violet Cove Oyster Co. Credit: Randee Daddona) (Photo Credits: Newsday / John Keating Richard Slattery

Josh Clauss smiles as he hands out plates of fresh oysters on the half shell.

“You’ve got to try these,” he says proudly. “They’re sweet, delicious and the absolute perfect size. I grow them myself right here on the North Fork in the beautiful waters of Hog Neck Bay.”

It’s a late fall evening at the final First Friday celebration of the year on charming Love Lane in Mattituck. The street is closed to vehicular traffic in favor of a variety of pop-up food, drink and gift stands, live music and friendly conversation. A substantial line has formed of people waiting for the freshly shucked delights that Clauss, proprietor of Harvest Moon Shellfish Co. in Cutchogue, is selling by the half-dozen. Refreshingly passionate about his work, Clauss provides bivalve background, the crowd listening intently as he explains the planning and work that bring the shellfish to market.

Long Island oysters and oyster farming are a hot topic these days, especially among those who love to eat the sweet, slightly buttery-tasting shellfish, and those who hope the bivalves may play an increasingly important role in helping clean local waterways.

Mila McKey, operations manager, left, and Jonathan Smith, owner of Shinnecock Oyster Farms, walk in Salt Pond followed by Smith's children Ache and Kayden. Credit: Randee Daddona

Shellfish revival

A driving force of Long Island’s economy more than half a century ago, the rough-edged, sweet-fleshed shellfish had virtually disappeared from local waters by the 1950s because of factors including overharvesting, changes in water salinity and degradation of habitat. Today, a new set of oyster farmers has taken hold, raising the tasty treats instead of harvesting them from the wild. More farmers are entering the industry state Department of Conservation figures show On/Off-Bottom Culture Permits, required for all oyster farmers on Long Island, have risen yearly since 2015, when 63 permits were issued, to 2018, when 82 permits were issued.

Much of the growth in the oyster industry has been aided by cutting-edge shellfish research and technology developed by Cornell Cooperative Extension’s Marine Research Facility in Southold. “Among other items,” said Gregg Rivara, an aquaculture specialist in the extension’s Suffolk County office, “we developed a floating upweller nursery system in the 1990s to raise oysters and clams.” The “FLUPSYs” used by many shellfish farmers increase the water volume, and thus the plankton (food), delivered to young oysters in a farm setting, he explained.

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The reborn oyster trade has attracted diverse and eclectic entrepreneurs who also talk about working for the good of the industry and environment. Many in the tight-knit but growing circle list their ultimate goals as not only reaching profitability, but refining raising oysters to produce a more perfect product, reseeding waters to encourage wild oyster growth, and using the filter feeders to help clean the estuarine environment.

“There does seem to be a special kind of person that’s cut out for this job,” said Clauss, 37, a former commercial fisherman from Cutchogue with a degree in biology. “It’s hard work, and you need to keep a positive attitude while looking several years ahead to project earnings. Mostly, you have to love being around the water and have no fear of physical labor.”

No two farms or farmers, it seems, are exactly alike. Still, the basics are fairly consistent. After acquiring a lease to “farm” specific underwater acreage, oyster growers purchase spat (baby oysters) from a hatchery and grow them to between one-half and 1 inch in size under controlled conditions. At that point, most farmers place their potential crop in plastic mesh bags and load them into growing racks or cages that hold them on the bottom in open water or suspended at the surface. There the oysters feed on plankton they filter from the water. Adult oysters can each strain up to 50 gallons a day — great for the environment considering that some oyster farms have the potential to produce more than 1 million oysters a year.

Oyster farmers Mike and Kerrin Craig work off their 42-foot fishing boat. Their company, East End Oysters, produces Lazy Mermaid Oysters from the Long Island Sound. Credit: Randee Daddona

More than meets the eye

As the oysters continue to grow, they are regularly cleaned, “tumbled” and sorted, either on a boat or on shore. Sorting, by hand or mechanically, keeps oysters consistent in size for a similar appearance when shipped to market 18 to 24 months hence. Tumbling requires placing the oysters in a rotating cylindrical chamber that chips off new growth and sharp edges, encouraging a rounder, more uniform shape and a deeper pocket that holds larger oyster meats than are found in the wild. Oysters in the tumbler can drop through various-size holes in the chamber, sorting themselves by size. Once tumbled and sorted, oysters that are large enough to harvest are quickly packed for shipping while the smaller ones are returned to the racks, bags or underwater beds.

Oyster farmers also must taken care of the business end: finding distribution points to consumers, restaurants and seafood stores figuring out how to transport harvest to market navigating permits and accounting building a brand name.

“There is more to this than meets the eye,” Clauss said with a laugh, adding that everyone tackles it their own way.

Josh Clauss of Cutchogue, proprietor of Harvest Moon Shellfish Co., pulls up oyster cages out of Hog Neck Bay in Peconic on Nov. 23. Credit: Randee Daddona

Clauss’ farm, for example, is in Little Peconic Bay, on the border between the bucolic villages of Peconic and Southold. It’s an ideal place for oysters, he explained, because three spring-fed freshwater creeks spill into the bay nearby. The creeks ensure plenty of plankton for the oysters to feed on, especially early in the year when they are warmer than the surrounding bay waters.

Clauss uses a rack and bag system to grow his oysters 25 feet deep. Individual racks rest on the bay bottom, their oysters growing from 1 inch to a market size of 2 to 3 inches. When it’s time to clean, sort, tumble and gather them for harvest, a mechanical hoist lifts the heavy racks to the surface, where they are placed aboard Clauss’ 26-foot oyster boat.

“You really need to be flexible in this job,” Clauss said. “Things are always changing and breaking. You need to adjust on the fly, putting out fires ranging from fixing boats to replacing lines and repairing equipment. But that’s also one of the best things about this job — no two days are alike and you are always thinking on your feet. It never gets boring.”

A family tradition

Clauss had a leg up in the business after working for the Cornell Cooperative Extension Marine Program for several years, raising scallops to reseed Peconic Bay and experimenting with raising oysters as well. Sue Wicks, on the other hand, had only a year’s experience growing oysters when she launched Violet Cove Oyster Co. on Moriches Bay.

Sue Wicks, the owner of Violet Cove Oyster Co., wades in Moriches Bay to check on her oysters on Nov. 26. "I love being on the water every day," said Wicks, who has just wrapped up her second year as a full-time oyster farmer. "The physicality reminds me of my sports past. Credit: Randee Daddona

Wicks, 53, of Center Moriches, is a former all-pro professional basketball player and member of the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame whose 16-year career spanned the WNBA, European and Asian leagues. She got into the business after her brother put her in contact with Moriches Bay oyster farmer Paul McCormick, of Great Gun Shellfish Co., for whom he had done contracting work. She worked on his oyster farm, and two years later had her own 2-acre lease.

“My dad was a bayman,” said Wicks, “so being on the water is part of my heritage. I knew about fishing and clamming, but little about oysters other than I had been interested in the idea of farming them for about a decade. For me the timing was right, so I just went for it.”

Wicks uses no heavy machinery, relying instead on her own strength, dexterity and a hand from Mother Nature. Her farm is between Moriches and New inlets on a shallow, hard, sandy flat along the north side of Moriches Bay, an area with plenty of current that is also fed by two freshwater rivers. She raises oysters in floating cages that rely on wave action to gently rock the oysters, chipping off the outer shell and giving them a deep, full cup without the need for additional tumbling. The wave action, she explained, also causes the oyster’s adductor muscle to grow larger, stronger and store more glycogen in the winter months, providing a sweeter taste than oysters in the wild.

“I love being on the water every day,” said Wicks, who has just wrapped up her second year as a full-time oyster farmer. “The physicality reminds me of my sports past. I love using my body, coming home feeling fatigued from physical labor and testing my own limits as I grow older. To some degree, I feel Mother Nature is my competitor. You battle her tides, storms, algae blooms and other elements. Yet she is also my partner, providing the necessary ingredients for a successful set.

Matt Ketcham, owner of Peconic Gold Oysters, formerly known as Ketcham's Seafarm, sells oysters out of a cooler in front of his Cutchogue home. Credit: Randee Daddona

“I also love the nurturing aspects of raising a crop,” she said. “There’s a lot of time involved with growing your oysters to market size so it does get personal on some level.”

Increasing demand

In the waters of Shinnecock Bay, Jonathan Smith, an American Indian who is part of the Shinnecock Nation and owner of Shinnecock Oyster Farms in Southampton, also sets his oysters in shallow water. He uses an upwelling system that forces high volumes of water up into a silo in which the spat are housed. The increased flow brings the baby oysters more food than tidal action can deliver, getting his crop off to a quick start.

“We lease a shallow section of Shinnecock Bay,” said Smith, 59. “Once our oysters reach a half-inch to 1 inch long in our upwelling system, we simply scatter them on the bottom in shallow water. It’s a simple system, really, but it is vulnerable to our oysters being washed up onto the shore during severe storms, so we might add a small corral next year just to keep them better confined.”

The cleaner water in eastern Shinnecock Bay, noted Smith, results in a sweet, mild-tasting oyster. “You’ll find none better,” he said with obvious pride. He said increased demand for his oysters has set in place plans for an oyster grill on Montauk Highway near the Shinnecock Smoke Shop next summer.

“We’re very optimistic about the future of oyster farming here on Long Island,” Smith said.

While most Long Island oyster farms are on the East End and in Great South and Moriches bays, the husband-and-wife team of Kerrin and Mike Craig of Miller Place, both 58, are making a go of it in the Sound just outside of Mount Sinai Harbor. They got into the oyster business in 2002 after the Long Island Sound lobster die-off in1999 forced Mike, a lobsterman, into a career change.

“We raise our oysters in deeper, cooler waters than most other farms,” Mike said, noting that environment gives East End Oysters, which they sell to New York City restaurants, a crisper taste. “We market them as Lazy Mermaid oysters, and they really are something special to try.”

The Craigs set their crop in large racks on the bottom weighing as much as 1,500 pounds, including their cargo of oysters, and use an A-frame boom to lift the racks onto their 42-foot fishing vessel. It is challenging work, Mike admitted, but it’s been fruitful, with the farm producing upward of 400,000 oysters a year.

“We enjoy working as a team, dealing with nature and being on the water every day,” Kerrin said. “We like making our own decisions as to when to buy seed, when to pull the racks, when to tumble and how much work to schedule for each day.

"On the other hand," she said, "you really have to love the water to head out on a cold and rainy December day, so this job isn’t necessarily for everyone.”

For those who thrive on hard work, though, oyster farming cultivates a sense of being part of something special — a community that toils in Long Island’s waters with love and respect for nature while building an appreciation for restoring a long-retired industry.

“I’m really impressed by the diversity and resolve of everybody involved,” Wicks said. “We understand the value of hard work, we pull together to help each other and to grow the industry, and most seem to care deeply about the environment.

“I’d love to see oyster farming continue to thrive,” she said. “I want to see it help clean our waters, and I’d like to see wild oysters repopulate our estuaries as they did in the past — even if that might be somewhat detrimental to my own business.”

CORRECTION: Gregg Rivara is an aquaculture specialist in the Cornell Cooperative Extension’s Suffolk County office. His name was misspelled in an earlier version of this story.

Getting started

Interested in becoming an oyster farmer? There is still plenty of room in Long Island's rebounding industry, which the state Department of Environmental Conservation estimates has 50 to 60 active oyster farms. Experts suggest prospective farmers start small: plan to try it a year or two before jumping in full scale.

While no special courses or degrees are required, arranging to lease bay bottom and obtaining permits can take two years or more. Depending on the entity — town, county, state or private — leases can be relatively inexpensive, with some acreage as low as $25 an acre per year.

For state land, contact the DEC’s Shellfish Management Unit at 631-444-0481 or [email protected] For questions about Suffolk County’s Shellfish Aquaculture Lease Program, contact Susan Filipowich, environmental planner, at 631-853-4775 or [email protected] For town leases, contact individual towns. If you don’t know who owns the land you want to lease, contact a Shellfish Ombudsman at the DEC’s Region 1 Headquarters in Stony Brook, ‪631-380-3311‬‬‬‬‬‬‬.

Shellfish aquaculture farming requires a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers permit and a DEC Culture Permit. Visit DEC’s website, dec.ny.gov/outdoor/110882.html#OnOff-Bottom_Culture_Permit.

Oyster farmers sell wholesale, directly to the public, to restaurants and seafood markets. A recent development on the oyster sales front is a farmstand format now permitted in Southold Town. “This opens the door for oyster growers to sell more product, make their oysters more readily available to the public, and get a better price than when selling wholesale,” said Matt Ketcham, owner of Peconic Gold Oysters. “It should also help with name recognition.”


Shellfishing regulations

For bivalve season information, please see the 2021 Puget Sound clam, mussel, and oyster season guide. A list of the tides in the Puget Sound region that favor good harvest results can be found in the 2021 best clam and oyster harvest tides chart.

2020-2021 sport fishing rules

2020-2021 sport fishing rules pamphlet. These rules go into effect July 1, 2020.

Razor clam seasons and beaches

Razor clams are one of the most sought-after shellfish species in Washington.

Emergency rule changes

See emergency rule changes, including fishing rule changes issued by WDFW.

Clam, mussel, and oyster beaches

Find information about public clam, mussel, and oyster beaches, including harvest seasons, beach locations, and current Department of Health status.

Shellfish/seaweed species harvest rules

Find information about daily limits for shellfish and seaweed and shellfish harvest size rules.

Shellfish safety and season information

See up-to-date health and season information for shellfish and shellfish beaches.

Crab seasons and areas

Each year, sport fishers catch more than a million pounds of Dungeness crab.

Shrimp

Shrimp are recreationally and commercially harvested in Washington.

Statewide gear rules

Learn about the statewide gear rules for crab, shrimp, and crawfish.

Report lost or stolen shellfishing gear

If WDFW can recover your gear and it is properly identified, we can attempt to return it to you.


Shellfish Recall in Long Island Sound - Recipes

Washington shellfish resources are managed by both the DOH (safety & water quality) and WDFW (harvest regulations).

Beach Status

All areas are closed for the recreational (sport) harvest of scallops due to biotoxins.

Public Shellfish Beaches (click beaches for info.)
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Closed (click beach for species)
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Beach End Points
Vibriosis Advisory Area (click area for info.)
Take summer precautions

Marine Biotoxin Closure Zones
(click area for info.) Closed for all species including clams, geoduck, scallops, mussels, oysters, snails and other invertebrates (not crab or shrimp). Open for Razor Clams. Closed for all other species. Closed for all Species including Crab Closed for all Crab Species and Razor Clams Closed for all Crab Species Closed for Razor Clams only Closed for Butter Clams, Geoduck and Varnish Clams only Closed for Butter and Varnish Clams only Closed for Butter and Geoduck Clams only Closed for Butter Clams only Closed for Varnish Clams only Closed for Geoducks only Closed for Other Species Combinations.
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(click area for info.) Approved Conditionally Approved Unclassified Closed Due to Pollution
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Is it safe to eat oysters during months without the letter R?

THE TRUTH

Yes, it absolutely is safe to eat raw oysters during months without the letter “r” (e.g., May, June, July, August). If you’re in Australia and New Zealand, you’re probably thinking that’s when oysters are best.

So where did this idea come from?

Generally, most oyster gurus attribute this adage back to a time before modern oyster farming technology, when the repopulation of oysters solely depended upon oysters in the wild. In the Northern hemisphere, oysters spent much of their energy reproducing during the r-less, summer months. During that time, it was best for harvesters to leave the the oysters alone to reseed the beds.

THE HISTORY

Some articles, like this New York Times piece, credits William Butler, an English physician to King James I, with stating, “The oyster is unseasonable and unwholesome in all months that have not the letter R in their name,” in 1599. But according to a 2017 New York Times article, the quote is also credited to Henry Buttes in an 1599 English cookbook, Dyets Drie Dinner. Luckily for you and me, Nigel Moore, an intrepid oyster enthusiast / history buff, wrote an in-depth blog post about this whole thing.

MY R RULES

So now you know that the R-month rule is out of date and out of touch with the realities of the oyster industry today. Here are the two R rules that I follow: Refrigeration and Regulation.

Refrigeration: Don’t eat oysters that haven’t been kept cold. The FDA recommends keeping live shellfish below 40 degrees F, especially in summer months when the risk of vibrio growth in the water is higher.

Regulation: Don’t eat random oysters that you find on the beach, unless if it’s from a designated recreational shellfish harvest zone. Also, don’t buy oysters from people or places without proper documentation. To be extra conservative, first check to see if the company’s name is listed on the FDA’s Interstate Certified Shellfish Shippers List.


Long Island Haunts

Long Island’s history is chock full of legends and ghost stories

Long Island used to be home to a dozen American Indian tribes. It was settled by Europeans in the 1600s and the site of major battles during the Revolutionary War. Plantations run by slavery dotted the Island until the Civil War. By the late 1800s, prominent families like the Roosevelts and the Vanderbilts made their homes here. In the early 20th century, Long Island was the epicenter of the the typhoid fever epidemic, and hard hit by tuberculosis and the Great Depression as well. With as storied a past as Long Island has, it is no surprise there are reports of ghostly activity all over the place.

Where are the most haunted places on Long Island? Here are a few:

Hempstead House

Hempstead House at Sands Point Preserve is a hotbed of ghost activity

Hempstead House at Sands Point Preserve has a long and fascinating history. Designed and built in 1912, the 50,000-square-foot castlelike mansion saw Long Island through the roaring ’20s, the turbulent ’30s, wartime and beyond, but it is more than a Gatsby-era estate with manicured gardens and opulent furnishings.

Click here for a more detailed history of Hempstead House

During World War II, owner Florence Guggenheim opened up the home to refugee children from Europe. To this day, employees and visitors report hearing children’s laughter, as well as other strange noises with no discernible origin. By all accounts, the ghosts of Hempstead House mean no harm. Though he does not believe the ghost stories, Sands Point staff member Jeremiah Bosgang never looks back at the house after locking up at night—his own personal protection against bringing any unwanted spirits home with him.

Click here to read LIW’s experience ghost hunting at Hempstead House.

Guided tours of Hempstead House are available most weekends. Contact the gate house at 516-571-7901 for more information.

Mt. Misery

The Lady In White haunts the woods of Mount Misery.

Mount Misery is a wooded area in Huntington believed by many to be a cursed land. The name likely came from the steep rocky terrain that made travel difficult. Sources refer to a mental hospital built there in the 1700s or 1800s, but information is hard to verify. Supposedly there are accounts of loud screams and moans emanating from the asylum prior to it burning down. Attempts at rebuilding also ended in flames.

These events begat many legends. The Lady in White may be a patient of the hospital, a local woman killed in a hit-and-run or of unknown origins. The apparition appears suddenly in front of cars at night. There may be a police officer missing part of his skull roaming the area and a Hell Hound may stare at visitors with fiery red eyes, an omen of death.

If you are brave enough to explore the woods of Mount Misery, don’t go alone.

Kings Park Psychiatric Center

Kings Park Psychiatric Center Building 93 (Photo by Brian Wasser, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons)

Operating from 1885 to 1996, the Kings Park Psychiatric Center is the source of much folklore on Long Island. Originally called the Kings County Asylum, the complex was a self-sufficient farming community for many years. As the hospital became overcrowded, the agrarian approach to treating mental illness eventually gave way to invasive techniques, such as pre-frontal lobotomies and shock therapy. This era of the facility served as inspiration for season two of FX’s American Horror Story: Asylum.

The abandoned 13-story building looms over the tiny town of Kings Park, a ripe setting for ghost stories. There are reports of screaming and banging noises coming from the buildings at night, escaped patients hiding out on the grounds, a white figure with a red mouth and eyes and other paranormal activity.

The deteriorating site seduces ghost hunters and urban explorers on a regular basis, but visiting the psychiatric center is ill-advised due to asbestos and lack of safety measures in place.

Execution Rocks

Execution Rocks Lighthouse (Photo by United States Coast Guard)

In the Long Island Sound between New Rochelle and Sands Point is Execution Rocks Lighthouse, named for the dangerous conditions created by exposed rocks during low tide. British soldiers chained Revolutionary War prisoners to the rocks, condemning them to death by drowning as the tide rose.

In the 1920s, the waters surrounding the lighthouse became the dumping ground of serial killer Carl Panzram. He killed his victims with a Colt .45 stolen from former President William Taft’s home, tied rocks to the bodies, rowed them out into the Sound and sunk them mercilessly beside Execution Rocks. In Panzram’s autobiography, he admitted to being “not the least bit sorry” for his crimes.

By 1979, the lighthouse no longer required a live-in keeper or Coast Guard member to operate the beacon—lucky for them. According to ghost hunters, spirits are active there. Countless souls haunt the island with cries of pain and terror.

Historically Significant Structures, a nonprofit dedicated to the restoration of Execution Rocks Lighthouse, offers tours June through September. The fearless may stay overnight with special arrangements.

Grey Horse Tavern

Grey Horse Tavern in Bayport (Image courtesy of Wikipedia)

Built in 1868, Grey Horse Tavern in Bayport is a landmark establishment. Originally, the tavern also functioned as a livery stable, a place where horse owners pay a weekly or monthly fee to keep their horses.

Today, the restored establishment is a restaurant. Patrons sense a female presence in the building, whom the current owners have dubbed Iris. Staff members have reported hearing singing coming from an empty bathroom and oddities concerning doorknobs. Many glowing orbs have been spotted and photographed at the tavern. Read more about the ghost activity there in Kerriann Flanagan Brosky’s new book, Historic Haunts of Long Island.

Grey Horse Tavern is open Tuesdays through Sundays and serves fresh, wholesome and sustainable American cuisine popular with locals and destination diners alike.

Amityville Horror House

Photo taken inside the Amityville Horror House by Gene Campbell. (Courtesy of HistoryvsHollywood.com)

The Infamous Amityville Horror House made headlines in 1974 when Ronald DeFeo Jr., drunk, high on heroin and hearing voices, killed his family while they slept. The following year, newlyweds George and Kathy Lutz bought the home and invited a Catholic priest to bless the premises. The priest recalls feeling unusually cold while blessing the sewing room and hearing a deep voice say, “Get out!” while no one else was there.

The Lutz family also encountered strange voices, which awoke them every morning at 3:15 a.m., the time the murders had taken place, and swarms of flies. They lasted only 28 days in the home before moving out. Shortly after, psychics and demonologists inspected the property and, in addition to cold spots and disembodied voices, reported feeling significant unexplained mood changes and unknown presences lingering around. A photo taken by the paranormal team captured the image of a boy with white eyes peering out of a doorway.

The house still stands on Ocean Avenue and is currently for sale for $850,000.

Lake Ronkonkoma

Mural depicting the legend of Lake Ronkonkoma. (Photo courtesy of Long Island Exchange)

Until the 1600s, four Indian tribes shared the shoreline of Long Island’s largest freshwater and deepest lake. They considered it sacred and relied on fish from its waters for food. Early European settlers claimed the water had special healing powers, drawing a number of tourists by the late 1800s, transforming the area into a resort town.

Several myths and legends are associated with the lake. Unusually, in times of heavy rainfall, the level of the lake was known to fall and in times of drought, the lake would continue to rise, spurring the belief that its depths are connected to the Long Island Sound or Great South Bay.

The Birdsall Legend tells the story of a beautiful Indian princess named Ronkonkoma who fell in love with a settler named Hugh Birdsall. He lived in a cabin on the nearby Connetquot River. Ronkonkoma’s father forbid marriage, so for seven long years the lovers floated messages to each other down the river. Ronkonkoma finally boarded a canoe in order to join her lover, but when the canoe arrived to its destination, Birdsall found her lifeless inside. Heartbroken, he joined her in the canoe and the two were carried out to sea, now able to spend eternity together.

The princess is now said to haunt the lake. Each year for the past 200 years, she drags down at least one young man. Drowning incidents are frequent and police and locals recall very few women drowning there, in keeping with the lore.

Read more about the history of Lake Ronkonkoma on the Lake Ronkonkoma Historical Society website, www.lakerhs.org.

Maine Maid Inn

Maine Maid Inn in the 1840s (Photo courtesy of Save The Maine Maid Inn Facebook page)

The Maine Maid Inn in Jericho was built in the late 1700s as the home of Quaker abolitionist Valentine Hicks, a founder of the Long Island Rail Road, namesake of nearby town Hicksville and station master on the Underground Railroad. The Hicks family helped nearly 200 slaves by offering them safety on their way north to freedom. After Hicks’ death, the home was turned into an inn and popular location for banquets. Past guests have reported seeing apparitions, hearing banging sounds, footsteps and voices coming from secret rooms and stairwells.

The inn was designated a historic landmark in 2012. It is currently closed and undergoing extensive renovations.

Camp Hero

Do Not Enter sign at Camp Hero (Photo courtesy of Wikipedia)

The famed Montauk Project involves a series of top secret experiments in mind control, time travel, teleportation, parapsychology and the creation of black holes. In 1943, the Philadelphia Experiment created technology which allowed the U.S.S. Eldridge, a navy destroyer in the Philadelphia Naval Yard, to become invisible, materialize off the coast of Norfolk, Virginia, and reappear at a different port in Philadelphia. As a result of the teleportation, crew members became trapped in metal parts of the ship and died painful deaths.

The military later moved their operations to Camp Hero in Montauk, which was sparsely populated at the time. A huge subterranean complex was built where clandestine experimentation could continue, some say, until today. Rumors abound of abducted children, frightening monsters, time portals and alien activity. Camp Hero is the inspiration for the Netflix hit Stranger Things, originally sold under the working title Montauk.

Hikers and urban explorers report hearing screams in the abandoned tunnels below Camp Hero. Though the base is considered to be inactive, but conspiracy theories persist. Camp Hero State Park is a pleasant getaway. Drop by one day and decide for yourself.

Tinker Town

Merrick residents know all about the mythical Tinker Town, a neighborhood said to be home to reclusive and diminutive inhabitants. The town where houses and street signs are built in miniature is hard to locate, but that doesn’t stop mischievous high schoolers and drunk locals from trying. If you do happen upon Tinker Town, beware. The residents are not known to be kind to trespassers.

Other notable haunted places on Long Island include Oheka Castle, Raynham Hall, Montauk Manor, Winfield Hall and Suffolk County Tuberculosis Sanatorium.