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Starbucks Cafe Locations Extend Closures Through May 3 Due to Coronavirus


Coronavirus precautions continue

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On April 1, Starbucks employees were informed that the coffee chain would extend cafe closures and catastrophe pay and benefits until May 3. The decision comes as COVID-19, also known as the novel coronavirus, continues to spread across the United States, and non-essential personnel are urged to stay at home to mitigate the risk of the virus spreading.

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Roseann Williams, executive vice president, informed staff that their safety is the company’s top priority in an open letter.

The popular coffee chain plans to protect its employees and the public by encouraging anyone who feels sick to self-isolate and use their Catastrophe Pay benefit. Those who feel healthy and choose to continue working will receive an additional $3 per hour. According to the letter, the company also plans to send thermometers to all company-operated stores.

The letter also states that Starbucks plans to extend temporary cafe closures until May 3 as a way to prevent social gathering. It will continue to serve the public at select drive-thru and delivery only stores.

In March, the chain also announced plans to give coronavirus first responders free coffee until May 3. And The Starbucks Foundation, the chain’s philanthropic arm, will donate $500,000 to support front-line responders in the U.S. The donation will provide care packages to healthcare workers as well as essential medical items.

In addition to Starbucks, other companies have stepped up amidst the coronavirus pandemic and are taking steps to help employees and first-responders. Here is a list of all of the food brands giving back during the COVID-19 outbreak.


Starbucks speeds up 'on-the-go' store format as coronavirus lockdowns ease

Starbucks (SBUX) is doubling down on its efforts to adopt more stores to an "on-the-go" format as it adapts to the economic realities of life after coronavirus lockdowns.

On Tuesday, Starbucks forecast that COVID-19 related lockdowns would cost it more than $2 billion in the current quarter, and “adverse impacts” from the crisis will erode comparable quarterly sales by 40-45%. However, CEO Kevin Johnson told employees in a letter that "the most difficult period is now behind us,” and the company is in the midst of “clear evidence of business recovery” as sales rebound.

The coffee giant shuttered many of its U.S. company-operated stores during the pandemic, and saw comparable sales drop. During the next 18 months, Starbucks plans to transform its stores by adding drive-thru and curbside pick-up options, as well as rolling out more Starbucks Pick-up stores — accelerating its initial transformation timeline of three to five years.

Approximately 96% of Starbucks stores are now open globally. In the U.S., 95% of the store fleet is open, while 99% of the locations in China are operating. Of those U.S. stores currently closed, most are in the New York City area.

While Starbucks' recovery will extend into the next fiscal year, the coffee chain has seen six consecutive weeks of sequential improvement in its closely-watched comparable-store sales. Coming off its weekly low of -65% in mid-April, comparable-store sales in the U.S. for the final week in May were down 32% versus a year ago.


Starbucks speeds up 'on-the-go' store format as coronavirus lockdowns ease

Starbucks (SBUX) is doubling down on its efforts to adopt more stores to an "on-the-go" format as it adapts to the economic realities of life after coronavirus lockdowns.

On Tuesday, Starbucks forecast that COVID-19 related lockdowns would cost it more than $2 billion in the current quarter, and “adverse impacts” from the crisis will erode comparable quarterly sales by 40-45%. However, CEO Kevin Johnson told employees in a letter that "the most difficult period is now behind us,” and the company is in the midst of “clear evidence of business recovery” as sales rebound.

The coffee giant shuttered many of its U.S. company-operated stores during the pandemic, and saw comparable sales drop. During the next 18 months, Starbucks plans to transform its stores by adding drive-thru and curbside pick-up options, as well as rolling out more Starbucks Pick-up stores — accelerating its initial transformation timeline of three to five years.

Approximately 96% of Starbucks stores are now open globally. In the U.S., 95% of the store fleet is open, while 99% of the locations in China are operating. Of those U.S. stores currently closed, most are in the New York City area.

While Starbucks' recovery will extend into the next fiscal year, the coffee chain has seen six consecutive weeks of sequential improvement in its closely-watched comparable-store sales. Coming off its weekly low of -65% in mid-April, comparable-store sales in the U.S. for the final week in May were down 32% versus a year ago.


Starbucks speeds up 'on-the-go' store format as coronavirus lockdowns ease

Starbucks (SBUX) is doubling down on its efforts to adopt more stores to an "on-the-go" format as it adapts to the economic realities of life after coronavirus lockdowns.

On Tuesday, Starbucks forecast that COVID-19 related lockdowns would cost it more than $2 billion in the current quarter, and “adverse impacts” from the crisis will erode comparable quarterly sales by 40-45%. However, CEO Kevin Johnson told employees in a letter that "the most difficult period is now behind us,” and the company is in the midst of “clear evidence of business recovery” as sales rebound.

The coffee giant shuttered many of its U.S. company-operated stores during the pandemic, and saw comparable sales drop. During the next 18 months, Starbucks plans to transform its stores by adding drive-thru and curbside pick-up options, as well as rolling out more Starbucks Pick-up stores — accelerating its initial transformation timeline of three to five years.

Approximately 96% of Starbucks stores are now open globally. In the U.S., 95% of the store fleet is open, while 99% of the locations in China are operating. Of those U.S. stores currently closed, most are in the New York City area.

While Starbucks' recovery will extend into the next fiscal year, the coffee chain has seen six consecutive weeks of sequential improvement in its closely-watched comparable-store sales. Coming off its weekly low of -65% in mid-April, comparable-store sales in the U.S. for the final week in May were down 32% versus a year ago.


Starbucks speeds up 'on-the-go' store format as coronavirus lockdowns ease

Starbucks (SBUX) is doubling down on its efforts to adopt more stores to an "on-the-go" format as it adapts to the economic realities of life after coronavirus lockdowns.

On Tuesday, Starbucks forecast that COVID-19 related lockdowns would cost it more than $2 billion in the current quarter, and “adverse impacts” from the crisis will erode comparable quarterly sales by 40-45%. However, CEO Kevin Johnson told employees in a letter that "the most difficult period is now behind us,” and the company is in the midst of “clear evidence of business recovery” as sales rebound.

The coffee giant shuttered many of its U.S. company-operated stores during the pandemic, and saw comparable sales drop. During the next 18 months, Starbucks plans to transform its stores by adding drive-thru and curbside pick-up options, as well as rolling out more Starbucks Pick-up stores — accelerating its initial transformation timeline of three to five years.

Approximately 96% of Starbucks stores are now open globally. In the U.S., 95% of the store fleet is open, while 99% of the locations in China are operating. Of those U.S. stores currently closed, most are in the New York City area.

While Starbucks' recovery will extend into the next fiscal year, the coffee chain has seen six consecutive weeks of sequential improvement in its closely-watched comparable-store sales. Coming off its weekly low of -65% in mid-April, comparable-store sales in the U.S. for the final week in May were down 32% versus a year ago.


Starbucks speeds up 'on-the-go' store format as coronavirus lockdowns ease

Starbucks (SBUX) is doubling down on its efforts to adopt more stores to an "on-the-go" format as it adapts to the economic realities of life after coronavirus lockdowns.

On Tuesday, Starbucks forecast that COVID-19 related lockdowns would cost it more than $2 billion in the current quarter, and “adverse impacts” from the crisis will erode comparable quarterly sales by 40-45%. However, CEO Kevin Johnson told employees in a letter that "the most difficult period is now behind us,” and the company is in the midst of “clear evidence of business recovery” as sales rebound.

The coffee giant shuttered many of its U.S. company-operated stores during the pandemic, and saw comparable sales drop. During the next 18 months, Starbucks plans to transform its stores by adding drive-thru and curbside pick-up options, as well as rolling out more Starbucks Pick-up stores — accelerating its initial transformation timeline of three to five years.

Approximately 96% of Starbucks stores are now open globally. In the U.S., 95% of the store fleet is open, while 99% of the locations in China are operating. Of those U.S. stores currently closed, most are in the New York City area.

While Starbucks' recovery will extend into the next fiscal year, the coffee chain has seen six consecutive weeks of sequential improvement in its closely-watched comparable-store sales. Coming off its weekly low of -65% in mid-April, comparable-store sales in the U.S. for the final week in May were down 32% versus a year ago.


Starbucks speeds up 'on-the-go' store format as coronavirus lockdowns ease

Starbucks (SBUX) is doubling down on its efforts to adopt more stores to an "on-the-go" format as it adapts to the economic realities of life after coronavirus lockdowns.

On Tuesday, Starbucks forecast that COVID-19 related lockdowns would cost it more than $2 billion in the current quarter, and “adverse impacts” from the crisis will erode comparable quarterly sales by 40-45%. However, CEO Kevin Johnson told employees in a letter that "the most difficult period is now behind us,” and the company is in the midst of “clear evidence of business recovery” as sales rebound.

The coffee giant shuttered many of its U.S. company-operated stores during the pandemic, and saw comparable sales drop. During the next 18 months, Starbucks plans to transform its stores by adding drive-thru and curbside pick-up options, as well as rolling out more Starbucks Pick-up stores — accelerating its initial transformation timeline of three to five years.

Approximately 96% of Starbucks stores are now open globally. In the U.S., 95% of the store fleet is open, while 99% of the locations in China are operating. Of those U.S. stores currently closed, most are in the New York City area.

While Starbucks' recovery will extend into the next fiscal year, the coffee chain has seen six consecutive weeks of sequential improvement in its closely-watched comparable-store sales. Coming off its weekly low of -65% in mid-April, comparable-store sales in the U.S. for the final week in May were down 32% versus a year ago.


Starbucks speeds up 'on-the-go' store format as coronavirus lockdowns ease

Starbucks (SBUX) is doubling down on its efforts to adopt more stores to an "on-the-go" format as it adapts to the economic realities of life after coronavirus lockdowns.

On Tuesday, Starbucks forecast that COVID-19 related lockdowns would cost it more than $2 billion in the current quarter, and “adverse impacts” from the crisis will erode comparable quarterly sales by 40-45%. However, CEO Kevin Johnson told employees in a letter that "the most difficult period is now behind us,” and the company is in the midst of “clear evidence of business recovery” as sales rebound.

The coffee giant shuttered many of its U.S. company-operated stores during the pandemic, and saw comparable sales drop. During the next 18 months, Starbucks plans to transform its stores by adding drive-thru and curbside pick-up options, as well as rolling out more Starbucks Pick-up stores — accelerating its initial transformation timeline of three to five years.

Approximately 96% of Starbucks stores are now open globally. In the U.S., 95% of the store fleet is open, while 99% of the locations in China are operating. Of those U.S. stores currently closed, most are in the New York City area.

While Starbucks' recovery will extend into the next fiscal year, the coffee chain has seen six consecutive weeks of sequential improvement in its closely-watched comparable-store sales. Coming off its weekly low of -65% in mid-April, comparable-store sales in the U.S. for the final week in May were down 32% versus a year ago.


Starbucks speeds up 'on-the-go' store format as coronavirus lockdowns ease

Starbucks (SBUX) is doubling down on its efforts to adopt more stores to an "on-the-go" format as it adapts to the economic realities of life after coronavirus lockdowns.

On Tuesday, Starbucks forecast that COVID-19 related lockdowns would cost it more than $2 billion in the current quarter, and “adverse impacts” from the crisis will erode comparable quarterly sales by 40-45%. However, CEO Kevin Johnson told employees in a letter that "the most difficult period is now behind us,” and the company is in the midst of “clear evidence of business recovery” as sales rebound.

The coffee giant shuttered many of its U.S. company-operated stores during the pandemic, and saw comparable sales drop. During the next 18 months, Starbucks plans to transform its stores by adding drive-thru and curbside pick-up options, as well as rolling out more Starbucks Pick-up stores — accelerating its initial transformation timeline of three to five years.

Approximately 96% of Starbucks stores are now open globally. In the U.S., 95% of the store fleet is open, while 99% of the locations in China are operating. Of those U.S. stores currently closed, most are in the New York City area.

While Starbucks' recovery will extend into the next fiscal year, the coffee chain has seen six consecutive weeks of sequential improvement in its closely-watched comparable-store sales. Coming off its weekly low of -65% in mid-April, comparable-store sales in the U.S. for the final week in May were down 32% versus a year ago.


Starbucks speeds up 'on-the-go' store format as coronavirus lockdowns ease

Starbucks (SBUX) is doubling down on its efforts to adopt more stores to an "on-the-go" format as it adapts to the economic realities of life after coronavirus lockdowns.

On Tuesday, Starbucks forecast that COVID-19 related lockdowns would cost it more than $2 billion in the current quarter, and “adverse impacts” from the crisis will erode comparable quarterly sales by 40-45%. However, CEO Kevin Johnson told employees in a letter that "the most difficult period is now behind us,” and the company is in the midst of “clear evidence of business recovery” as sales rebound.

The coffee giant shuttered many of its U.S. company-operated stores during the pandemic, and saw comparable sales drop. During the next 18 months, Starbucks plans to transform its stores by adding drive-thru and curbside pick-up options, as well as rolling out more Starbucks Pick-up stores — accelerating its initial transformation timeline of three to five years.

Approximately 96% of Starbucks stores are now open globally. In the U.S., 95% of the store fleet is open, while 99% of the locations in China are operating. Of those U.S. stores currently closed, most are in the New York City area.

While Starbucks' recovery will extend into the next fiscal year, the coffee chain has seen six consecutive weeks of sequential improvement in its closely-watched comparable-store sales. Coming off its weekly low of -65% in mid-April, comparable-store sales in the U.S. for the final week in May were down 32% versus a year ago.


Starbucks speeds up 'on-the-go' store format as coronavirus lockdowns ease

Starbucks (SBUX) is doubling down on its efforts to adopt more stores to an "on-the-go" format as it adapts to the economic realities of life after coronavirus lockdowns.

On Tuesday, Starbucks forecast that COVID-19 related lockdowns would cost it more than $2 billion in the current quarter, and “adverse impacts” from the crisis will erode comparable quarterly sales by 40-45%. However, CEO Kevin Johnson told employees in a letter that "the most difficult period is now behind us,” and the company is in the midst of “clear evidence of business recovery” as sales rebound.

The coffee giant shuttered many of its U.S. company-operated stores during the pandemic, and saw comparable sales drop. During the next 18 months, Starbucks plans to transform its stores by adding drive-thru and curbside pick-up options, as well as rolling out more Starbucks Pick-up stores — accelerating its initial transformation timeline of three to five years.

Approximately 96% of Starbucks stores are now open globally. In the U.S., 95% of the store fleet is open, while 99% of the locations in China are operating. Of those U.S. stores currently closed, most are in the New York City area.

While Starbucks' recovery will extend into the next fiscal year, the coffee chain has seen six consecutive weeks of sequential improvement in its closely-watched comparable-store sales. Coming off its weekly low of -65% in mid-April, comparable-store sales in the U.S. for the final week in May were down 32% versus a year ago.