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Science Explains Why Asparagus Makes Your Pee Smell Funny

Science Explains Why Asparagus Makes Your Pee Smell Funny


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Can you smell the difference? There’s a scientific reason why you may not

When it's green, it's innocent. When it's yellow, it's offensive.

This WebMD question really explains the meat of the issue at hand in this article and is incredibly LOL-worthy:

“Q: I've noticed that when I eat asparagus, my urine has a funny smell. Is that normal?

A: It's totally normal. In fact, the effect of asparagus on urine odor has been observed for centuries. French novelist Marcel Proust famously wrote in 1913 that asparagus ‘transforms my chamber-pot into a flask of perfume.’ And one British men's club is said to have put up a sign reading, ‘During the asparagus season, members are requested not to relieve themselves in the hat stand.’”

Click here for 22 Superfoods You Need To Stay Healthy This Spring.

Now that we’ve got that out of our system, let’s discuss why getting asparagus-laden pee out of our system is often a unique olfactory experience. Have you ever left liquid protein in a sealed shaker for too long? When you’re unfortunate enough to open it back up, it really stinks. Like, really, really smells horrendously awful. This is because of the sulfurous smell that the building blocks of proteins, amino acids, tend to carry.

Well guess what? Asparagus contains protein, too, and its amino acids break down in a particularly pungent way. Unlike the relatively neutral scent of asparagus in the raw, the broken down components of this nutritious vegetable’s amino acids can become airborne, allowing some of us to smell them in their most putrid form. The crazy thing that many of you have probably experienced is that asparagus can taint the smell of your urine unbelievably quickly. After eating asparagus, it isn’t rare for your very next trip to the can to smell strangely bitter and all-around icky. It takes as little as 15 minutes for asparagus to infect (that’s such a harsh word and it’s not technically accurate, but we’re keeping it anyway) your pee.

This smelly combination of chemicals is known as asparagusic acid and, believe it or not, is unique to asparagus. While some of us can clearly smell it, others have a harder time detecting the stench. Smithsonian Mag covers the hot (98.6 degrees warm, we’d say) topic of those who can’t smell asparagus in urine, saying, “Some believe that, for physiological reasons, these people (which constitute anywhere from 20 to 40 percent of the population) don’t produce the aroma in their urine when they digest asparagus, while others think that they produce the exact same scent, but somehow lack the ability to smell it.”

While there’s no conclusive evidence for either camp, further studies have shown the potential for one genetic mutation to be present amongst those who can’t smell asparagus in their pee. Whether it’s your nose’s incapability to detect the aroma, your stomach’s ability to reduce the scent of asparagusic acid, or something else altogether, those of us that are lucky enough to be "blessed" with the ability will continue to eat asparagus warily for the remainder of our leafy green days.


The Truth About Pheromones

The sight of someone in tears might make you feel concerned. But the smell of tears, researchers say, has a different effect.

Related Content

“You might think—we did—that [smelling] tears might create empathy,” says Noam Sobel, a neurobiologist at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. He and his colleagues had women watch a sad movie scene, collected their tears and placed samples of the unidentified fluid under men’s noses. The tears did not elicit empathy in a standard lab test, but they did reduce the men’s sexual arousal and testosterone levels. Apparently the tears sent a message that romance was off the table.

This study offers some of the most recent evidence that people perceive all sorts of interesting things about one another through olfaction. Airborne molecules that elicit a reaction in a member of the same species are called pheromones, and the most famous ones are potent aphrodisiacs, like androstenone and androstenol in the saliva of male boars. If a fertile female gets a whiff of these molecules, she’ll present her rear to the male, a universal gesture in wild pig patois that means, “Let’s start a family.”

Researchers (as well as fragrance companies) have been hoping to find a human sex pheromone for decades, but so far the search has failed, says George Preti of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia. “That doesn’t mean a human sex pheromone doesn’t exist,” Preti is quick to add. “It just means we haven’t found one yet.” In fact, some researchers suspect that if there is a turn-off pheromone, as Sobel’s team says, there’s likely to be a turn-on pheromone.

In one 2005 study, gay men given anonymous samples of sweat preferred the scent of gay men, and heterosexual men fancied the scent of women. One’s nose can also help identify a genetically compatible mate. Researchers asked women to rate the odors of T-shirts worn by different men. Women preferred men whose DNA was different enough from their own that it would increase the likelihood of producing a child with a robust immune system.

Newborns preferentially scoot toward the scent of breasts. And adults can often tell by smell whether the person who produced perspiration was anxious or not.

The search for human pheromones has been hampered by two obstacles. First, “the effects we see are not dramatic,” Sobel says. Instead, Preti says, our responses to odors are “confounded by other sensory inputs like sight and sound, past experiences, learning, context—and not to mention laws.”

Second, nobody has been able to find the exact chemicals that cue people about anxiety, mating compatibility or breast milk. This may be because researchers have traditionally analyzed aromatics from armpits. The fact is, any bodily fluid could potentially harbor pheromones, which is why Sobel studied tears of sadness. And who knows what signals are lurking in tears of joy?


The Truth About Pheromones

The sight of someone in tears might make you feel concerned. But the smell of tears, researchers say, has a different effect.

Related Content

“You might think—we did—that [smelling] tears might create empathy,” says Noam Sobel, a neurobiologist at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. He and his colleagues had women watch a sad movie scene, collected their tears and placed samples of the unidentified fluid under men’s noses. The tears did not elicit empathy in a standard lab test, but they did reduce the men’s sexual arousal and testosterone levels. Apparently the tears sent a message that romance was off the table.

This study offers some of the most recent evidence that people perceive all sorts of interesting things about one another through olfaction. Airborne molecules that elicit a reaction in a member of the same species are called pheromones, and the most famous ones are potent aphrodisiacs, like androstenone and androstenol in the saliva of male boars. If a fertile female gets a whiff of these molecules, she’ll present her rear to the male, a universal gesture in wild pig patois that means, “Let’s start a family.”

Researchers (as well as fragrance companies) have been hoping to find a human sex pheromone for decades, but so far the search has failed, says George Preti of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia. “That doesn’t mean a human sex pheromone doesn’t exist,” Preti is quick to add. “It just means we haven’t found one yet.” In fact, some researchers suspect that if there is a turn-off pheromone, as Sobel’s team says, there’s likely to be a turn-on pheromone.

In one 2005 study, gay men given anonymous samples of sweat preferred the scent of gay men, and heterosexual men fancied the scent of women. One’s nose can also help identify a genetically compatible mate. Researchers asked women to rate the odors of T-shirts worn by different men. Women preferred men whose DNA was different enough from their own that it would increase the likelihood of producing a child with a robust immune system.

Newborns preferentially scoot toward the scent of breasts. And adults can often tell by smell whether the person who produced perspiration was anxious or not.

The search for human pheromones has been hampered by two obstacles. First, “the effects we see are not dramatic,” Sobel says. Instead, Preti says, our responses to odors are “confounded by other sensory inputs like sight and sound, past experiences, learning, context—and not to mention laws.”

Second, nobody has been able to find the exact chemicals that cue people about anxiety, mating compatibility or breast milk. This may be because researchers have traditionally analyzed aromatics from armpits. The fact is, any bodily fluid could potentially harbor pheromones, which is why Sobel studied tears of sadness. And who knows what signals are lurking in tears of joy?


The Truth About Pheromones

The sight of someone in tears might make you feel concerned. But the smell of tears, researchers say, has a different effect.

Related Content

“You might think—we did—that [smelling] tears might create empathy,” says Noam Sobel, a neurobiologist at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. He and his colleagues had women watch a sad movie scene, collected their tears and placed samples of the unidentified fluid under men’s noses. The tears did not elicit empathy in a standard lab test, but they did reduce the men’s sexual arousal and testosterone levels. Apparently the tears sent a message that romance was off the table.

This study offers some of the most recent evidence that people perceive all sorts of interesting things about one another through olfaction. Airborne molecules that elicit a reaction in a member of the same species are called pheromones, and the most famous ones are potent aphrodisiacs, like androstenone and androstenol in the saliva of male boars. If a fertile female gets a whiff of these molecules, she’ll present her rear to the male, a universal gesture in wild pig patois that means, “Let’s start a family.”

Researchers (as well as fragrance companies) have been hoping to find a human sex pheromone for decades, but so far the search has failed, says George Preti of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia. “That doesn’t mean a human sex pheromone doesn’t exist,” Preti is quick to add. “It just means we haven’t found one yet.” In fact, some researchers suspect that if there is a turn-off pheromone, as Sobel’s team says, there’s likely to be a turn-on pheromone.

In one 2005 study, gay men given anonymous samples of sweat preferred the scent of gay men, and heterosexual men fancied the scent of women. One’s nose can also help identify a genetically compatible mate. Researchers asked women to rate the odors of T-shirts worn by different men. Women preferred men whose DNA was different enough from their own that it would increase the likelihood of producing a child with a robust immune system.

Newborns preferentially scoot toward the scent of breasts. And adults can often tell by smell whether the person who produced perspiration was anxious or not.

The search for human pheromones has been hampered by two obstacles. First, “the effects we see are not dramatic,” Sobel says. Instead, Preti says, our responses to odors are “confounded by other sensory inputs like sight and sound, past experiences, learning, context—and not to mention laws.”

Second, nobody has been able to find the exact chemicals that cue people about anxiety, mating compatibility or breast milk. This may be because researchers have traditionally analyzed aromatics from armpits. The fact is, any bodily fluid could potentially harbor pheromones, which is why Sobel studied tears of sadness. And who knows what signals are lurking in tears of joy?


The Truth About Pheromones

The sight of someone in tears might make you feel concerned. But the smell of tears, researchers say, has a different effect.

Related Content

“You might think—we did—that [smelling] tears might create empathy,” says Noam Sobel, a neurobiologist at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. He and his colleagues had women watch a sad movie scene, collected their tears and placed samples of the unidentified fluid under men’s noses. The tears did not elicit empathy in a standard lab test, but they did reduce the men’s sexual arousal and testosterone levels. Apparently the tears sent a message that romance was off the table.

This study offers some of the most recent evidence that people perceive all sorts of interesting things about one another through olfaction. Airborne molecules that elicit a reaction in a member of the same species are called pheromones, and the most famous ones are potent aphrodisiacs, like androstenone and androstenol in the saliva of male boars. If a fertile female gets a whiff of these molecules, she’ll present her rear to the male, a universal gesture in wild pig patois that means, “Let’s start a family.”

Researchers (as well as fragrance companies) have been hoping to find a human sex pheromone for decades, but so far the search has failed, says George Preti of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia. “That doesn’t mean a human sex pheromone doesn’t exist,” Preti is quick to add. “It just means we haven’t found one yet.” In fact, some researchers suspect that if there is a turn-off pheromone, as Sobel’s team says, there’s likely to be a turn-on pheromone.

In one 2005 study, gay men given anonymous samples of sweat preferred the scent of gay men, and heterosexual men fancied the scent of women. One’s nose can also help identify a genetically compatible mate. Researchers asked women to rate the odors of T-shirts worn by different men. Women preferred men whose DNA was different enough from their own that it would increase the likelihood of producing a child with a robust immune system.

Newborns preferentially scoot toward the scent of breasts. And adults can often tell by smell whether the person who produced perspiration was anxious or not.

The search for human pheromones has been hampered by two obstacles. First, “the effects we see are not dramatic,” Sobel says. Instead, Preti says, our responses to odors are “confounded by other sensory inputs like sight and sound, past experiences, learning, context—and not to mention laws.”

Second, nobody has been able to find the exact chemicals that cue people about anxiety, mating compatibility or breast milk. This may be because researchers have traditionally analyzed aromatics from armpits. The fact is, any bodily fluid could potentially harbor pheromones, which is why Sobel studied tears of sadness. And who knows what signals are lurking in tears of joy?


The Truth About Pheromones

The sight of someone in tears might make you feel concerned. But the smell of tears, researchers say, has a different effect.

Related Content

“You might think—we did—that [smelling] tears might create empathy,” says Noam Sobel, a neurobiologist at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. He and his colleagues had women watch a sad movie scene, collected their tears and placed samples of the unidentified fluid under men’s noses. The tears did not elicit empathy in a standard lab test, but they did reduce the men’s sexual arousal and testosterone levels. Apparently the tears sent a message that romance was off the table.

This study offers some of the most recent evidence that people perceive all sorts of interesting things about one another through olfaction. Airborne molecules that elicit a reaction in a member of the same species are called pheromones, and the most famous ones are potent aphrodisiacs, like androstenone and androstenol in the saliva of male boars. If a fertile female gets a whiff of these molecules, she’ll present her rear to the male, a universal gesture in wild pig patois that means, “Let’s start a family.”

Researchers (as well as fragrance companies) have been hoping to find a human sex pheromone for decades, but so far the search has failed, says George Preti of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia. “That doesn’t mean a human sex pheromone doesn’t exist,” Preti is quick to add. “It just means we haven’t found one yet.” In fact, some researchers suspect that if there is a turn-off pheromone, as Sobel’s team says, there’s likely to be a turn-on pheromone.

In one 2005 study, gay men given anonymous samples of sweat preferred the scent of gay men, and heterosexual men fancied the scent of women. One’s nose can also help identify a genetically compatible mate. Researchers asked women to rate the odors of T-shirts worn by different men. Women preferred men whose DNA was different enough from their own that it would increase the likelihood of producing a child with a robust immune system.

Newborns preferentially scoot toward the scent of breasts. And adults can often tell by smell whether the person who produced perspiration was anxious or not.

The search for human pheromones has been hampered by two obstacles. First, “the effects we see are not dramatic,” Sobel says. Instead, Preti says, our responses to odors are “confounded by other sensory inputs like sight and sound, past experiences, learning, context—and not to mention laws.”

Second, nobody has been able to find the exact chemicals that cue people about anxiety, mating compatibility or breast milk. This may be because researchers have traditionally analyzed aromatics from armpits. The fact is, any bodily fluid could potentially harbor pheromones, which is why Sobel studied tears of sadness. And who knows what signals are lurking in tears of joy?


The Truth About Pheromones

The sight of someone in tears might make you feel concerned. But the smell of tears, researchers say, has a different effect.

Related Content

“You might think—we did—that [smelling] tears might create empathy,” says Noam Sobel, a neurobiologist at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. He and his colleagues had women watch a sad movie scene, collected their tears and placed samples of the unidentified fluid under men’s noses. The tears did not elicit empathy in a standard lab test, but they did reduce the men’s sexual arousal and testosterone levels. Apparently the tears sent a message that romance was off the table.

This study offers some of the most recent evidence that people perceive all sorts of interesting things about one another through olfaction. Airborne molecules that elicit a reaction in a member of the same species are called pheromones, and the most famous ones are potent aphrodisiacs, like androstenone and androstenol in the saliva of male boars. If a fertile female gets a whiff of these molecules, she’ll present her rear to the male, a universal gesture in wild pig patois that means, “Let’s start a family.”

Researchers (as well as fragrance companies) have been hoping to find a human sex pheromone for decades, but so far the search has failed, says George Preti of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia. “That doesn’t mean a human sex pheromone doesn’t exist,” Preti is quick to add. “It just means we haven’t found one yet.” In fact, some researchers suspect that if there is a turn-off pheromone, as Sobel’s team says, there’s likely to be a turn-on pheromone.

In one 2005 study, gay men given anonymous samples of sweat preferred the scent of gay men, and heterosexual men fancied the scent of women. One’s nose can also help identify a genetically compatible mate. Researchers asked women to rate the odors of T-shirts worn by different men. Women preferred men whose DNA was different enough from their own that it would increase the likelihood of producing a child with a robust immune system.

Newborns preferentially scoot toward the scent of breasts. And adults can often tell by smell whether the person who produced perspiration was anxious or not.

The search for human pheromones has been hampered by two obstacles. First, “the effects we see are not dramatic,” Sobel says. Instead, Preti says, our responses to odors are “confounded by other sensory inputs like sight and sound, past experiences, learning, context—and not to mention laws.”

Second, nobody has been able to find the exact chemicals that cue people about anxiety, mating compatibility or breast milk. This may be because researchers have traditionally analyzed aromatics from armpits. The fact is, any bodily fluid could potentially harbor pheromones, which is why Sobel studied tears of sadness. And who knows what signals are lurking in tears of joy?


The Truth About Pheromones

The sight of someone in tears might make you feel concerned. But the smell of tears, researchers say, has a different effect.

Related Content

“You might think—we did—that [smelling] tears might create empathy,” says Noam Sobel, a neurobiologist at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. He and his colleagues had women watch a sad movie scene, collected their tears and placed samples of the unidentified fluid under men’s noses. The tears did not elicit empathy in a standard lab test, but they did reduce the men’s sexual arousal and testosterone levels. Apparently the tears sent a message that romance was off the table.

This study offers some of the most recent evidence that people perceive all sorts of interesting things about one another through olfaction. Airborne molecules that elicit a reaction in a member of the same species are called pheromones, and the most famous ones are potent aphrodisiacs, like androstenone and androstenol in the saliva of male boars. If a fertile female gets a whiff of these molecules, she’ll present her rear to the male, a universal gesture in wild pig patois that means, “Let’s start a family.”

Researchers (as well as fragrance companies) have been hoping to find a human sex pheromone for decades, but so far the search has failed, says George Preti of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia. “That doesn’t mean a human sex pheromone doesn’t exist,” Preti is quick to add. “It just means we haven’t found one yet.” In fact, some researchers suspect that if there is a turn-off pheromone, as Sobel’s team says, there’s likely to be a turn-on pheromone.

In one 2005 study, gay men given anonymous samples of sweat preferred the scent of gay men, and heterosexual men fancied the scent of women. One’s nose can also help identify a genetically compatible mate. Researchers asked women to rate the odors of T-shirts worn by different men. Women preferred men whose DNA was different enough from their own that it would increase the likelihood of producing a child with a robust immune system.

Newborns preferentially scoot toward the scent of breasts. And adults can often tell by smell whether the person who produced perspiration was anxious or not.

The search for human pheromones has been hampered by two obstacles. First, “the effects we see are not dramatic,” Sobel says. Instead, Preti says, our responses to odors are “confounded by other sensory inputs like sight and sound, past experiences, learning, context—and not to mention laws.”

Second, nobody has been able to find the exact chemicals that cue people about anxiety, mating compatibility or breast milk. This may be because researchers have traditionally analyzed aromatics from armpits. The fact is, any bodily fluid could potentially harbor pheromones, which is why Sobel studied tears of sadness. And who knows what signals are lurking in tears of joy?


The Truth About Pheromones

The sight of someone in tears might make you feel concerned. But the smell of tears, researchers say, has a different effect.

Related Content

“You might think—we did—that [smelling] tears might create empathy,” says Noam Sobel, a neurobiologist at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. He and his colleagues had women watch a sad movie scene, collected their tears and placed samples of the unidentified fluid under men’s noses. The tears did not elicit empathy in a standard lab test, but they did reduce the men’s sexual arousal and testosterone levels. Apparently the tears sent a message that romance was off the table.

This study offers some of the most recent evidence that people perceive all sorts of interesting things about one another through olfaction. Airborne molecules that elicit a reaction in a member of the same species are called pheromones, and the most famous ones are potent aphrodisiacs, like androstenone and androstenol in the saliva of male boars. If a fertile female gets a whiff of these molecules, she’ll present her rear to the male, a universal gesture in wild pig patois that means, “Let’s start a family.”

Researchers (as well as fragrance companies) have been hoping to find a human sex pheromone for decades, but so far the search has failed, says George Preti of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia. “That doesn’t mean a human sex pheromone doesn’t exist,” Preti is quick to add. “It just means we haven’t found one yet.” In fact, some researchers suspect that if there is a turn-off pheromone, as Sobel’s team says, there’s likely to be a turn-on pheromone.

In one 2005 study, gay men given anonymous samples of sweat preferred the scent of gay men, and heterosexual men fancied the scent of women. One’s nose can also help identify a genetically compatible mate. Researchers asked women to rate the odors of T-shirts worn by different men. Women preferred men whose DNA was different enough from their own that it would increase the likelihood of producing a child with a robust immune system.

Newborns preferentially scoot toward the scent of breasts. And adults can often tell by smell whether the person who produced perspiration was anxious or not.

The search for human pheromones has been hampered by two obstacles. First, “the effects we see are not dramatic,” Sobel says. Instead, Preti says, our responses to odors are “confounded by other sensory inputs like sight and sound, past experiences, learning, context—and not to mention laws.”

Second, nobody has been able to find the exact chemicals that cue people about anxiety, mating compatibility or breast milk. This may be because researchers have traditionally analyzed aromatics from armpits. The fact is, any bodily fluid could potentially harbor pheromones, which is why Sobel studied tears of sadness. And who knows what signals are lurking in tears of joy?


The Truth About Pheromones

The sight of someone in tears might make you feel concerned. But the smell of tears, researchers say, has a different effect.

Related Content

“You might think—we did—that [smelling] tears might create empathy,” says Noam Sobel, a neurobiologist at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. He and his colleagues had women watch a sad movie scene, collected their tears and placed samples of the unidentified fluid under men’s noses. The tears did not elicit empathy in a standard lab test, but they did reduce the men’s sexual arousal and testosterone levels. Apparently the tears sent a message that romance was off the table.

This study offers some of the most recent evidence that people perceive all sorts of interesting things about one another through olfaction. Airborne molecules that elicit a reaction in a member of the same species are called pheromones, and the most famous ones are potent aphrodisiacs, like androstenone and androstenol in the saliva of male boars. If a fertile female gets a whiff of these molecules, she’ll present her rear to the male, a universal gesture in wild pig patois that means, “Let’s start a family.”

Researchers (as well as fragrance companies) have been hoping to find a human sex pheromone for decades, but so far the search has failed, says George Preti of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia. “That doesn’t mean a human sex pheromone doesn’t exist,” Preti is quick to add. “It just means we haven’t found one yet.” In fact, some researchers suspect that if there is a turn-off pheromone, as Sobel’s team says, there’s likely to be a turn-on pheromone.

In one 2005 study, gay men given anonymous samples of sweat preferred the scent of gay men, and heterosexual men fancied the scent of women. One’s nose can also help identify a genetically compatible mate. Researchers asked women to rate the odors of T-shirts worn by different men. Women preferred men whose DNA was different enough from their own that it would increase the likelihood of producing a child with a robust immune system.

Newborns preferentially scoot toward the scent of breasts. And adults can often tell by smell whether the person who produced perspiration was anxious or not.

The search for human pheromones has been hampered by two obstacles. First, “the effects we see are not dramatic,” Sobel says. Instead, Preti says, our responses to odors are “confounded by other sensory inputs like sight and sound, past experiences, learning, context—and not to mention laws.”

Second, nobody has been able to find the exact chemicals that cue people about anxiety, mating compatibility or breast milk. This may be because researchers have traditionally analyzed aromatics from armpits. The fact is, any bodily fluid could potentially harbor pheromones, which is why Sobel studied tears of sadness. And who knows what signals are lurking in tears of joy?


The Truth About Pheromones

The sight of someone in tears might make you feel concerned. But the smell of tears, researchers say, has a different effect.

Related Content

“You might think—we did—that [smelling] tears might create empathy,” says Noam Sobel, a neurobiologist at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. He and his colleagues had women watch a sad movie scene, collected their tears and placed samples of the unidentified fluid under men’s noses. The tears did not elicit empathy in a standard lab test, but they did reduce the men’s sexual arousal and testosterone levels. Apparently the tears sent a message that romance was off the table.

This study offers some of the most recent evidence that people perceive all sorts of interesting things about one another through olfaction. Airborne molecules that elicit a reaction in a member of the same species are called pheromones, and the most famous ones are potent aphrodisiacs, like androstenone and androstenol in the saliva of male boars. If a fertile female gets a whiff of these molecules, she’ll present her rear to the male, a universal gesture in wild pig patois that means, “Let’s start a family.”

Researchers (as well as fragrance companies) have been hoping to find a human sex pheromone for decades, but so far the search has failed, says George Preti of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia. “That doesn’t mean a human sex pheromone doesn’t exist,” Preti is quick to add. “It just means we haven’t found one yet.” In fact, some researchers suspect that if there is a turn-off pheromone, as Sobel’s team says, there’s likely to be a turn-on pheromone.

In one 2005 study, gay men given anonymous samples of sweat preferred the scent of gay men, and heterosexual men fancied the scent of women. One’s nose can also help identify a genetically compatible mate. Researchers asked women to rate the odors of T-shirts worn by different men. Women preferred men whose DNA was different enough from their own that it would increase the likelihood of producing a child with a robust immune system.

Newborns preferentially scoot toward the scent of breasts. And adults can often tell by smell whether the person who produced perspiration was anxious or not.

The search for human pheromones has been hampered by two obstacles. First, “the effects we see are not dramatic,” Sobel says. Instead, Preti says, our responses to odors are “confounded by other sensory inputs like sight and sound, past experiences, learning, context—and not to mention laws.”

Second, nobody has been able to find the exact chemicals that cue people about anxiety, mating compatibility or breast milk. This may be because researchers have traditionally analyzed aromatics from armpits. The fact is, any bodily fluid could potentially harbor pheromones, which is why Sobel studied tears of sadness. And who knows what signals are lurking in tears of joy?


Watch the video: Τι θέλει απο εσένα αυτό το άτομο; (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Hiamovi

    I'm sorry, of course, but this doesn't suit me. There are other options?

  2. Reule

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  3. Alhsom

    At all is not present.



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